Wyre Ramblers - Walks Archive

A Walks

2020

04/07/2021 - THE ROACHES

A Walk for 4th July 2021

The ROACHES (nr. Leek)

Leader John Adams

Distance 11.8 miles / 19.1 km

Ascent (total) 2560 ft / 780 m

Descent (total) 2370 ft / 724 m

Time 5.5 hours

Sunset Time 21:36

Map OL24- The Peak District - The White Peak Area - West Sheet

Start Grid Ref SJ921648


The walk commences on the A523 at the Old Smithy garage bus stop. Just after passing Bosley, we take to the ascending lane and follow it until we reach the track up to Stilemeadow farm.
Passing through the farm delivers us into a small woodland continuing upwards until we reach Hawkslee. Crossing the lane we descend to cross Shell Brook then ascend again to Winkle Grange farm.
Once again we descend to cross the River Dane (near the microbrewery some members sampled in 2018!) Crossing to the other bank via the road bridge we continue following the river, until the inflow of Black Brook in Gradbach Wood.
Having enjoyed the leisurely start to the day we now find ourselves with a little bit of ascent before us. As we seek out ‘Luds Church’ a very narrow deep cleft in the hillside rocks, which we’ll explore.
Out of ’Luds Church’ we ascend steadily through Gradbach Wood then on to the brow of the hill.
We’ll cross the narrow lane near Roaches End & Bearstone Rock, this is the start of the path across the ‘Roaches’ (there’s usually an ice cream van located here!) in 2018 we all sat and enjoyed an ice cream or ice lolly!
We arrive at the trig point (505m/1657 ft) on top of the Roaches,Today’s highest point. A little further on we come across a rather odd place to find a pond, namely Doxey Pool on top of the Ridge no less!
Whilst below us on our right you will find the spectacular rock walls which are a favourite with the rock climbing fraternity. On reaching the apparent end of the ‘Roaches’ you’ll notice one last hill before us, this is ‘Hen Cloud’
This is our last climb of the day (only 60m/200 ft) to the top!
Sadly having taken your photos and marvelled at the views we now have to make our down, we pass around toward the rear of ’Hen Cloud’ taking the path toward Naychurch.
Taking the route along the valley bottom past Dains Mill leads us into Upper Hulme, where we will call into the Rock Inn for a quick one! Leaving Upper Hulme we take the Whitty lane track/path to Middle Hulme, then taking one of the entrance paths off the lane to Tittesworth reservoir and its visitor centre.
Here we might be able to enjoy another ice-cream perhaps, and visit the loos before the coach transports us back home.
Today’s walk is not a difficult one, although quite long. However we do have a 500 ft/150 m steepish ascent out of the Dane valley. Then some ups and downs along the Roaches ridge.
At last count we have 29 booked on, certainly better but hopefully when we're past July 19th we'll see a greater rise in numbers?
See you Sunday
Regards
John
06/06/2021 - TEBAY

A Walk for 6th June 2021

TEBAY via Kendal & A6

Leader John Adams

Distance 10 miles / 15.7 km

Ascent (total) 2335 ft / 711 m

Descent (total) 2660 ft / 810 m

Time 5.5 hours

Sunset Time 21:40

Map OL7 - The English Lakes - South Eastern Area & OL19 Howgill Fells and Upper Eden Valley

Start Grid Ref NY553033


Hello everyone,
Looks like a dry day in prospect this coming Sunday! Like Peter I'm repeating a walk we last did in 2017 (November!) that was a dry day but quite cold. Hopefully those of you who haven't travelled this quiet corner on the fringe of the Lakes before will have a good days outing. It's not a long route but it does have its ups and downs, quite a few of them. Eight/nine tops all told. It also has quite a testing descent into the valley bottom, all told around 365m/1200ft. Plus a bit of off piste (100m/350ft?), not a problem!
The walk starts today in the middle of nowhere. We’ll disembark on the A6 on the bend just before ‘Huck’s Bridge’ We start the day climbing, as we ascend to the first of the seven tops today.
Initial ascent of 155m/500ft from the A6 to the first summit, (Ashstead fell)
  • Ashstead Fell (1539ft/469m)
  • Mabbin Crag (1581ft/482m)
  • Castle Fell\Old High (1568ft/478m)
  • Whinfell Beacon (1549ft/472m)
  • Repeater Station (1440ft/439m)
  • Grayrigg Forest (1621ft/494m) the day's highest point.
  • Grayrigg Pike (1568ft/478m)
  • Birk Knott (1326ft/404m)
Whilst on Grayrigg Pike we’ll have a grandstand view, high above the M6 gazing across to the Howgills on the other side of the valley.
We commence our steep descent into the Borrowdale valley some 350m/1200 ft below, following the wall over firstly over Birk Knott then down the nose of the fell to the lane in the valley bottom. Taking the lane east out of the valley we find ourselves on the A685, here we turn north for a short distance on the A685 to find a gate which gives us access to the bottom of the fell above the road. Following the field edge until we reach the corner fence, we continue following the field edges until we step back onto the tarmac leading into Roundthwaite hamlet.
We cross the bridge over Roundthwaite Beck then take the righthand lane to pass under the M6. The road peters out into a track which leads us under the main west coast railway line into a field. Ahead is the very obvious footbridge passing high over the River Lune, having crossed it, the footpath deposits us into Tebay just around the corner (right!) from The Cross Keys.
The walk today is strenuous, although having attained the summit of Ashstead Fell ‘most’ of the rest of the tops are fairly undemanding. The exception being the descent!
We still have some seats available, so if you know anyone who would like to join us get them to contact me! See you Sunday
Regards
John
23/05/2021 - PATTERDALE

A Walk for 23rd May 2021

PATTERDALE

Leader John Adams

Distance 12.5 miles / 20.2 km

Ascent (total) 3188 ft / 972 m

Descent (total) 3285 ft / 982 m

Time 7 hours

Sunset Time 21:24

Map Outdoor Leisure OL5 - The English Lakes - North Eastern Area

Start Grid Ref SD385169


Hello everyone,
Sorry for the very late delivery, with the poor forecast it's always awkward deciding which route to take! Like Peter I've been weather watching! All to no avail, it's still going to be a wet one, albeit wetter in the afternoon. So taking a page from Peter's book I've opted for a mid level route. It's quite a number of years since I last did this route.
We'll ascend to 600m/1970ft in the first part of the walk over Nick Head. But according to the Lakeland forecast the morning should be relatively dry? So fingers crossed etc, we'll get over and down before the wet starts.
The rest of the walk is fairly easy, although I remember parts of the route were a bit soggy and muddy after Gowbarrow! We'll be nice and dry in Pooley Bridge waiting to be collected by the coach on the home run.
The walk commences at car park at Glenridding.
On leaving the bus we commence our first ascent as we make our way past the Youth Hostel and the old mine workings up to Nick Head (today’s highest point, 617m/2024ft) an ascent of 459m/1505ft.
We now head into the lovely U shaped valley of Glencoyne. (a classic example of glacial erosion)
Walking high above the valley floor we contour under Glencoyne Head to above Glencoyne Brow, here we commence our descent across the flank of the fell to Aira Force. Having passed Aira Force we make our way up to the nose of Gowbarrow, arriving at the Memorial seat.
We follow the path around the eastern side of Gowbarrow into Swinburn’s plantation on Kirksty Brow, then contouring the fell side under Little Meldrum. Crossing the brow behind Hagg Wood we descend to the lane and take the path opposite across the fields to Bennethead.
On the other side of Bennethead we leave the lanes to follow permissive paths taking us through Rumney’s Plantation, then depositing us alongside the A592. The final leg along the permissive paths brings us to the bridge over the river Eamont into Pooley Bridge.
Today’s walk is quite long and with a lot of ascent over the day. We get the main climb out of the way as we leave the coach. The first ascent on to Nicks Head is steady. The good news is, is that it does become easier afterwards
See you tomorrow
Bring your wet gear you'll need it. Regards
John
09/05/2021 - KIRKBY LONSDALE

A Walk for 9th May 2021

KIRKBY LONSDALE

Leader John Adams

Distance 12.75 miles / 20.5 km

Ascent (total) 1430 ft / 435 m

Descent (total) 1440 ft / 440 m

Time 6 hours

Sunset Time 20:58

Map Outdoor Leisure 2 - The Yorkshire Dales - Western Area

Start Grid Ref SD617782


Hello everyone,
I'm actually ahead of the game this time around, mainly because I'm repeating the walk we last did in December 2019. The group who did it last time with me seemed to endure, I meant enjoyed it? The ascent toward the middle of the walk is fairly hard, due to the fact there isn't actually a footpath! If there is it's not well defined. It has a number of interesting features along the route, potholes, caves and a couple of rivers to cross, via bridges! Although there is a stream minus it's bridge as you'll notice in the description, we had no problems in 2019. It's a bit harder than the last walk, so helping to improve our fitness a little more?
The walk starts from just outside Kirkby Lonsdale (where the coach normally parks) just above the Devil’s bridge on the east bank of the river.
We turn North East crossing Laitha Lane, then via Cragg House Farm to walk along Chapelhouse Lane. At small cross-roads at Bees Nest we take the right hand turn to meet Wandales lane at a second crossroads. Leaving the tarmac up the farm track to Langthwaite, we take the path on our left, passing through Hole House, Fell Garth, Whelprigg, Low Bank House and Underfell farms to arrive at Barbon. Passing the church on our left we cross Barbon Beck then turn due east up Barbondale ascending to Blindbeck Bridge, from here we continue our ascent to arrive at Bullpot Farm (1005 ft / 306 m). We now take the potholers path past Bull Hole Of the Witches and various other potholes to cross over Leck Beck. NOTE, there is no bridge, well not in 2002! or in 2019! We follow the path south-westerly along the beck past the waterfalls through Springs Wood to Leck Mill. Leaving Leck Mill via Leck, the old disused railway and then across the A65 we make our last turn of the day, north-west from Overtown. Across the fields passing New House and Whoop Hall Hotel to recross the A65 on to Fleet’s lane. The end of Fleet’s lane puts us on Chapelhouse lane back to the coach and where we started.
Today's walk is a moderate one with one main ascent, about 210 m/ 690ft. There are a couple of places with some exposure! A rare circular route too!
We still have some seats available, although they're going pretty quick! I expect after the rain we have coming our way over the next week the fields we'll be crossing at the end of the walk will be muddy. (they were in 2019) I wonder if there will be somewhere open for our after walk refreshments in Kirkby? See you Sunday
Regards
John
25/04/2021 - BRAITHWAITE

A Walk for 25th April 2021

BRAITHWAITE via M6

Leader John Adams

Distance 9 miles / 14 km

Ascent (total) 2100 ft / 640 m

Descent (total) 2080 ft / 632 m

Time 5 hours

Sunset Time 20:35

Map Explorer OL4 - The English Lakes - North Western Area

Start Grid Ref NY198310


Hello everyone,
Well, finally after all this time we're getting back out to the fells! Sadly, we're still stuck with the restrictions a little while longer as yet, but, hopefully they will fall away next month or June. Then the mad rush on the Monday morning to try and bag one of the 26 seats will be behind us, a thing of the past? I've been asked to keep the walk sensible, consider the long absence off the hills I'm reminded! So, with that in mind I'm 'almost' repeating the final walk we managed last year.
Read on,
The walk starts at the lane off the A66 at the top of Bassenthwaite. Leaving the coach and walking along the lane passing the Pheasant Inn we ascend into the woodlands on the footpath and after a gentle climb we follow the forestry track along the hillside high above the A66. The track takes us round into the small valley of Beck Wythop. Leaving the track here we cross the beck and descend to the next forestry track lower down the fellside then on to another footpath.
We continue descending via the footpath, ultimately arriving on the old A66 main road. We’ll stay on the tarmac until we reach Powter How, from here we’ll be reclaiming some of our lost height.
We’ll follow Beckstones Gill uphill until we reach a height of 250 metres, from here we will cross through the trees to acquire another forestry track. Walking along various tracks we’ll round the hillside and descend through Thornthwaite Forest to into the valley and cross Comb Beck up to the Whinlatter Pass road.
Crossing over the road allows us to continue following the tracks again until we reach the path descending from Sleet How. This path leads us down back to the Whinlatter road and into Braithwaite, where I plan to have the coach waiting in the layby off the A66.

Today’s walk is moderate, we'll pass through lots of woodlands, over two summits. There is one main ascent 340m/1115ft over faint paths.
We don't have the slog up to 'Lord Seat' from Beck Wythop this time instead we go down, down! Well OK we do go back up a bit! You wouldn't expect me to make it too easy now, would you? So I'll see those of you who are venturing forth on Sunday.
Regards
John
25/10/2020 - KESWICK

A Walk for 25th October 2020

KESWICK

Leader John Adams

Distance 9 miles / 14.5 km

Ascent (total) 2605 ft / 795 m

Descent (total) 8575 ft / 785 m

Time 5 hours

Sunset Time 16:49

Map Explorer OL4 - The English Lakes - North Western Area

Start Grid Ref NY198310


Hello everyone,
I'm very late this week with my posting, watching the forecasts, looking on the Lakeland weather site it says there will be gusts up to 45/50 mph on the high summits plus showers! With the Howgills walk of earlier in September in mind, I've opted for something a little lower than Skiddaw or Blencathra.
Although I plan to reach over 550m. Hopefully the pinewoods will keep off the worst of the weather. I have in mind to park the coach in the lay-by near Braithwaite, this will avoid any questions possibly being asked of the driver.
We can still drop/pick up in Keswick if anyone wants to tackle Blencathra or Skiddaw, perhaps Peter could reroute out to Braithwaite on his return if he wished?
So on to the walk.
The walk starts at the lane off the A66 at the top of Bassenthwaite. Leaving the coach and walking along the lane passing the Pheasant Inn we ascend into the woodlands on the footpath and after a gentle climb we follow the forestry track along the hillside high above the A66. The track takes us round into the small valley of Beck Wythop. Staying on the track we cross the beck then leave the foresrty tracks on to the open fellside below Lord’s Seat.
We ascend the hillside on faint paths to reach the summit of Lord’s Seat, today’s highest point (552m / 1811ft) Our next destination is off the east, Barf (460m / 1509ft) with its great views across Bassenthwaite far below.
We take the path down to the forestry below us and return to the tracks through the Pines. Walking along various tracks we’ll round the hillside and descend through Thornthwaite Forest to into the valley and cross Comb Beck up to the Whinlatter Pass road.
Crossing over the road allows us to continue following the tracks again until we reach the path descending from Sleet How. This path leads us down back to the Whinlatter road and into Braithwaite, where I plan to have the coach waiting in the layby off the A66.

Today’s walk is moderate, we'll pass through lots of woodlands, over two summits. There is one main ascent 340m/1115ft over faint paths.
A good turnout tomorrow. I hope we'll be OK to go again on November 8th to Chipping, its within our tier 3 area so shouldn't present any problems. See you,
John
11/10/2020 - HAYFIELD

A Walk for 11th October 2020

HAYFIELD

Leader John Adams

Distance 15 miles / 15.5 km

Ascent (total) 813 ft / 250 m

Descent (total) 820 ft / 248 m

Time 7.3 hours

Sunset Time 18:19

Map Explorer OL1 - The Peak District - Dark Peak Area

Start Grid Ref SJ999958


Hello everyone,
I've been weather watching, and it seems that we may have yet another reasonable days walking weather ahead of us. Probably not as good as the weather on the Staveley trip though?
Not quite as good a turnout as on previous outings, but above the minimum number! I'm not venturing around the Kinder Scout area, instead I'm repeating a walk I last did 7 years ago.
It's a long one but it passes through some lovely countryside, and along some equally fine canals.
The walk starts before the junction of the A57 & A628 (nr Hollingworth). Leaving the coach at the bus stop we cross the A57 via the traffic island then walk along the A57 to Carr House Lane.
The lane takes us swiftly away from the busy A57 through Carr House farm to join the Etherow - Goyt Valley Way & Tameside Trail. The trail leads us across the fields to Broadbottom cliff and its viaduct, then we walk along the main road through Broadbottom to pass above Dinting Station.
Now following the Etherow - Goyt Valley Way we head off towards Compstall via Hodgefold, Botham’s Hall and the Etherow Country Park, passing by the weir. From Compstall on the Goyt Way & Midshires Way we cross over the river Goyt looking for the Macclesfield canal and Marple locks ahead of us, some 20 metres above the river valley floor.
We now have an easy five miles of canal towpath walking along the Peak Forest canal until we reach the marina at Newtown. Taking our leave of the canal we cross the busy A6015 then take the side streets to arrive back at the river Goyt.
Crossing the footbridge we walk along the Millenium Walkway into the ‘Park under the Town’ below New Mills, passing the ‘Torrs’ we take to the Sett Valley Trail which will bring us into our destination of Hayfield. Hopefully we’ll have enough time to pop over to the Royal Hotel for some refreshments before setting off home.
Although this is a long walk it has no major ascents, and is a lovely walk along the Etherow and Goyt Valleys.
See you Sunday,
Regards,
John
27/9/2020 - STAVELEY

A Walk for 27th September 2020

STAVELEY via Troutbeck

Leader John Adams

Distance 11.2 miles / 18 km

Ascent (total) 950 ft / 290 m

Time 6 hours

Sunset Time 18:56

Map Explorer OL7 The English Lakes - South Eastern Area

Start Grid Ref SD494954


Hello everyone,
I wonder if this may be our last walk for some unknown period of time? Like you all, I keep watching the latest restrictions and on how they'll affect us personally, and as a club.
(I was looking to coax the driver to drop me off at the Kirkstone Inn, he says he can't turn the coach round there though! so probably not happening. I planned to walk out to Thornthwaite Beacon then down the ridge over Froswick, Ill Bell and Yoke finishing off either over Sallows etc or the Kentmere valley into Staveley.
Then I checked out the figures! Turns out its over 21km/13 miles and over 920m/3000 ft ascent, with 1270m/4170ft of descent!
A bit much perhaps? considering we've only been out twice so far. I'll save it for another day, so we can look forward to it one day in the future.
So far it looks like a dry day in store although still with that cold northerly wind. I've opted for an easier outing instead, we last did this walk up Longsleddale in 2014 .
The walk commences on the A591 above the village of Burneside.
We pass through Tolson Hall farm on our way downhill to the railway station. Taking to the main street we cross over the River Kent then along Hall Rd. this brings us the River Sprint. (The river will be our companion for the next 5.5 miles (9km) as we walk half the length of the Longsleddale valley.)
We take to the lane below Hill Farm until just before Garnet Bridge, from here we follow the path along the West side of the valley bottom. Passing by farms and houses such as:- Cocks Close, Nether House, Tenter Howe, Bridge End, Docker Nook, Kilnstones, Wad’s Howe and Hollin Root.
At Hollin Root we commence the only real the climb of the day. We ascend over the gap between Sleddale Forest and Green Quarter. At the top to the right you’ll see Skeggles Water before the path starts it’s steady descent.
Not long into the descent the path changes over to tarmac (Hall Lane) at Park House. This quiet lane takes us to Barley Bridge over the River Kent then a short time after we finish the day in Staveley.
Today's walk is moderate, with only one ascent of note, a climb of 525 ft /160 m. However the first part of the ascent is steep (but short-lived).
Have you got yourselves registered on the website yet? It is secure, then you're able to book yourself on, or cancel if need be. You'll able to see who's already booked on and how many places/seats are left available. At the moment, the Maximum is 26 Households.
See you Sunday,
John
13/9/2020 - SEDBERGH

A Walk for 13th September 2020

SEDBERGH via Tebay

Leader John Adams

Distance 9.6 miles / 15.5 km

Ascent (total) 2313 ft / 705 m

Descent (total) 2588 ft / 789 m

Time 5.5 hours

Sunset Time 19:30

Map Explorer OL19 - The Howgill Fells and Upper Eden Valley

Start Grid Ref NY657050


Hello everyone,
Will this be our last outing again?
Hopefully not, we'll know when Redline pass on the information from the transport department as to whether we can continue or not. Like our previous outing I've kept it to a level that will suit us for our lack of hill walking. A bit easier really.
You'll be glad to hear I saved the 11 mile, 3500ft+ route for another time. We appear to have a pretty good forecast too, so far.
So what delights have I got for you?
The walk commences on the A685. About 4km / 2.5 miles from Tebay.
We take to the footpath from the roadside which leads us to a lane through Cotegill up past Archer Hill farm. The tarmac gives way to a track which leads us up the fellside to Langdale Knott summit(477m/1565ft), overlooking the Langdale valley.
Leaving Langdale Knott summit we head east to join the path up to West Fell summit (542m/1778ft) above the Bowderdale valley. From West Fell we continue along the ridge, passing over Hazelgill Knott (578m/1896ft)
Then a final ascent (140m/460ft ) brings us to the summit of the Calf, today’s highest point (676m/2218ft).
Our route continues over Bram Rigg Top (672m/2204ft) then Calders (674m/2211ft) and along Rowantree Grains just below Arant Haw (605m/1984ft). The path now commences the knee testing descent all the way down to Sedbergh alongside Settlebeck Gill.
The coach should be in the car park close to New Bridge over the river Rawthey on the A684.
Today's walk is strenuous, with a long steady ascent all the way to the Calf Summit (over 470m/1500ft of it!) As you would expect there’s a few up and downs before, and after! Plus the long descent (555m/1820ft) into Sedbergh
We have all the seats booked, so a good turnout. Thanks go to Gary for his work on setting up the website, you have registered, haven't you? See you Sunday then,
Regards,
John
30/8/2020 - GLENRIDDING

A Walk for 30th August 2020

GLENRIDDING via Kirkstone Pass

Leader John Adams

Distance 10 miles / 16 km

Ascent (total) 2420 ft / 738 m

Descent (total) 3392 ft / 1034 m

Time 6 hours

Sunset Time 20:06

Maps Explorer OL5 & OL7 The English Lakes - North Eastern and South Eastern Areas

Start Grid Ref NY401080


Hello everyone,
not said that in a while! Hope everyone is keeping well and safe.
It looks like we might have a reasonable day on Sunday (at least dry!) that should help make our first time out that much more pleasurable.
I was looking to do a tough walk, until it was pointed out to me that perhaps that wasn't such a good idea!
I've opted for a walk which I hope you will not find too hard, but will give us an enjoyable day out. I last walked this way in 2008
The walk commences at the Kirkstone Inn at the top of the pass on the A592.
Leaving the coach we set off uphill straight away! As we ascend to John’s Bell Banner then on to the first summit today, namely Stony Cove Pike (763m\2503ft).
To arrive at the next summit we must first descend STEEPLY into Threshthwaite Mouth a descent of 168m/550ft then climb backup 189m\620ft to Thornthwaite Crag and its ‘Beacon’. (784m/2572ft)
The next bit you’ll be pleased to hear is by comparison a ‘stroll in the park‘ as we tread the ancient route of the Roman legions i.e. High Street. (today’s highest point (828m\2716ft)
Crossing the Straits of Riggindale we tackle the lone summit of ‘The Knott’ (739m\2424ft) before going on to pass the curiously named Satura Crag.
Passing along the foot of Buck Crag we walk alongside Angle Tarn then lastly around Angle Tarn Pikes.
This brings us to a slow descent into Boredale Hause, the final descent from the hause is fairly steep but we finish with a nice level path across the valley floor to rejoin the A592 at Patterdale then off into Glenridding.
The walk today will feel like a ‘strenuous‘ one, especially after our long absence from the fells. We have some ups and downs over the day, including a ‘Steep awkward descent’ followed by a ‘Steep’ ascent to Thornthwaite Beacon.
We have quite a reasonable turnout (25 of which there are 4 couples) so we could squeeze in a couple more perhaps. Don't forget your face-masks please. You don't want to be disappointed. See you Sunday,
John
16/8/2020 - INGLETON

A B Walk for 16th August 2020

INGLETON via Settle & Horton

Leader John Adams

Distance 7.5 miles / 12.1 km

Ascent (total) 745 ft / 227 m

Descent (total) 1253 ft / 382 m

Time 6 hours

Sunset Time 20:36

Map OL2 The Yorkshire Dales - Southern & Western Areas

Start Grid Ref SD742776


Today’s walk is fairly easy with gentle ascent and descents.
Today I’m standing in for Peter.
The walk commences at the Old Hill pub on the Hawes rd toward Ingleton. Leaving the coach we’ll walk along Philpin lane up to Bruntscar farm.
We'll turn south-west along the track to pass through Ellerbeck farm and across Ellerbeck Gill. The path slowly rises as we pass right alondside various pot holes above Twistleton Scars.
Eventually we’ll meet up with a wall, (following it uphill would take you to the summit of Whernside some 6km away) however, we’ll take the path downhill to reach Twistleton Scar End.
At the foot of the Scar we turn north-west along the track to arrive on the Kingsdale road. (Yordas cave is a 3.5km further up the valley, a spectacular sight with its waterfall inside) Alas a bit far for us today, so we'll take the tarmac down to Thornton Hall.
Taking our leave of the black stuff we cross the fields until we arrive on a lane which takes us down into the very bottom of Ingleton, past the entrance of the ‘Falls’ walk.
(£7 a head now! I remember when it was free) just to finish is a steep little bank up to the coach park, or the village pubs! - your choice.
Pity you have to work Peter, no doubt you'll be missed!
2/2/2020 - CLITHEROE

A Walk for 2nd February 2020

CLITHEROE

Leader John Adams

Distance 10.5 miles / 17 km

Ascent (total) 1620 ft / 494 m

Time 5.5 hours

Sunset Time 16:52

Map OL41 Forest of Bowland

Start Grid Ref SD776465


Hello everyone
Sad to say the forecast as yet is none too good. I expect it'll be muddy so I'm taking my gaiters along.
I'm forsaking Pendle hill this time to explore a different hill on the other side of the Ribble valley.
There is a section where there aren't any paths shown on the map, but I expect there will be some local ones??
I'm also posting Les Holt's walk out, as an attachment for the B group, thanks Les for standing in.
Now who will be willing to take on the B walk next at Grasmere?
So here is my offering:-
The walk commences at Sawley.
We set off across the road bridge over the Ribble river, then taking the left fork to the track up past the church.
We pass behind the church heading for Lawson House farm then on uphill passing Rodhill Gate on Rodhill Lane.
We leave the lane, crossing to the farm track of Higher Heights farm, where we turn left to Smalden lane.
Our route takes us off Smalden lane along the path to our first trig point today, Beacon Hill (305m/1000ft).
We descend ‘Shivering Ginnel’ track to cross the stream at the bottom before ascending again via the forestry track over Grindleton Fell across the moorland to the B6478.
Turning south we leave the road climbing slightly to walk around the top edge of Waddington Fell Quarry to our second trig point (395m/1296ft).
Continuing across the open fell to Cob Castle hill, we descend via an old quarry track to cross over the B6478 picking up a path towards Cuttock Clough farm.
Following the path downhill alongside Feazer wood bypassing Feazer farm we arrive at the edge of Waddington village.
Turning east away from the village along the lane to opposite the school we continue downhill returning to the B6478, then across the Ribble river via Brungerley bridge.
Immediateley after crossing we’ll take the riverside path to Boy Bank wood, at the woodland end we cross the fields to Back Commons lane then along Castle View to pass under the railway line into Clitheroe proper.
Today’s walk is a moderate/easy one with only 1600 ft / 490m of ascent. And under 11 miles too! There is some off path walking across moorland though. The weather forecast is not good, might be a good idea to bring your gaiters!
I don't know if Les will start his walk at Sawley, we'll see on the day!
See you Sunday,
Regards, John
19/1/2019 - KENDAL

A Walk for 19th January 2020

GRASMERE

Leader John Adams

Distance 11.5 miles / 18.5 km

Ascent (total) 3547 ft / 1081 m

Time 6.5 hours

Sunset Time 16:25

Maps OL7 & OL5- The English Lakes (South Eastern and North Eastern Areas)

Start Grid Ref NY372040


Hello everyone.
Well it seems that we are set for a wall to wall sunny day! So say those nice weather reader people at the Beeb.
So, to help shake off some of those winter blues I'm going for a nice stroll around the Fairfield Horseshoe.
I am hoping we'll not be delayed by the M6 closure causing excess traffic on the A6, going or returning!
Perhaps if we are delayed to long getting to Ambleside, I'll ask the driver to pick my group up in Grasmere car park; after collecting all the other members first in Ambleside of course.
So, on to my offering:-
The walk commences in Ambleside at the recycling centre. We set out at the North end of Ambleside taking the road behind the Museum to Nook End farm. Crossing Low Sweden bridge we start the climb that finishes on the summits of Dove Crag & Fairfield.
The path up along the ridge passes over Low Pike (1667ft/508m) then High Pike (2152ft/656m) to level off a little over Dove Crag summit (2598ft/792m).
Next on the agenda is Hart Crag (2697ft/822m) and then finally the highest point of the day, Fairfield (2864ft/873m). Turning South we now start our descent to back toward Ambleside.
First we head off down the ridge to Great Rigg (2513ft/766m) then ignoring the path off to Stone Arthur (unless we're delayed) on our right we continue along to Heron Pike (2008ft\612m)
To the final descent today Nab Scar a tricky one down to Hart Head farm. Following the zig-zag lane down, we pass through Rydal Mount into the grounds of Rydal Park. The easy walking continues along the A591 which will deposit us back in Ambleside, with its numerous temptations to part you from your money.

Today’s walk is a tough one with over 3500 ft / 1000m of ascent. And over 11 miles too! The weather forecast is for SUNSHINE all day though.
So there you have it,
I see Graham has a walk planned too, many thanks Graham. Not sure if there will be any others on offer?
I'm sure the members will enjoy it enormously. I will have the New 2020 membership cards with me, I'll collect on the way home as usual after collecting the fares!
See you Sunday,
John

2019

22/12/2019 - KENDAL

A Walk for 22nd December 2019

KENDAL

Leader John Adams

Distance 10.5 miles / 16.8 km

Ascent (total) 1280 ft / 390 m

Descent (total) 1260 ft / 383 m

Time 5 hours

Sunset Time 15:49

Map OL7 - The English Lakes (south eastern area)

Start Grid Ref SD527829


Hello everyone.
Seems like we may have a dry one, albeit overcast, can't ask for more can we? Not a long walk this time, and an easy one too! You'll enjoy the first bit especially! I wonder if Kendal will be open? one would like to think it might be this close to Christmas. So here's the offering.
The walk commences on the layby on the A590 close to the M6 junction 36.
We start the day climbing a fence! this gets us off the busy A590 onto a quiet lane behind the layby hedge. Heading south-east we take the footpath under the A590 through Milton mill to the canal towpath.
We use the B6385 to cross the canal (Crooklands Bridge) then over the A65 to take the path alongside Peasy Beck to Challon Hall. Passing the side of the hall we cross the fields and a couple of lanes to arrive at Mount Pleasant then Intake Wood farms.
Finding ourselves back on yet another lane we follow it roughly north to a bridleway heading west to Birkrigg High Park farm. Continuing in a mainly north-westerly direction via Halfpenny, High House and Helm End farms we pitch up at the foot of the Helm. (Trig point 185m/607ft)
As you’ve guessed our next destination, having walked its whole length and descended to the B6254 we spy Hayclose lane directly opposite. On reaching the bend near Hayclose farm we take the track going straight on, passing through Hayfellside and Windy Hill farms to the A684.
A very brief walk on the A684 verge brings us to Paddy lane a single track road going northwards. Shortly after passing East Lodge and its associated farm we’ll come across the footpath sign pointing westwards and Kendal in the distance.
So its downhill we go across the fields, over the railway and across the A684 (again) on to Parkside road. Having passed under the Kendal/Windermere railway bridge we cross the grounds around the ruins of Kendal Castle to the old canal route, then across the river footbridge opposite the big church of St George on New Road Kendal.
Now where’s the coach? then the pub, or is that the other way round?
Today's walk is easy, and not a long one either. Probably muddy in them fields too!
Linda and myself would like to wish you all a very happy Christmas, New Year and 2020. Just think, the next trip is the Christmas meal, we always have an excellent time at Garstang. See you Sunday
John & Linda
8/12/2019 - KIRKBY LONSDALE

A Walk for 8th December 2019

KIRKBY LONSDALE

Leader John Adams

Distance 12.75 miles / 20.5 km

Ascent (total) 1430 ft / 435 m

Descent (total) 1440 ft / 440 m

Time 6 hours

Sunset Time 15:47

Map OL2 - The Yorkshire Dales - Western Areas

Start Grid Ref SD617782


Hello everyone.
Looks like we're in for some of the wet stuff, some showers predicted anyway!
The walk route offered is one I haven't done since 2002!! So high time it was revisited.
I expect we'll encounter mud across the numerous fields we'll be passing over, so gaiters perhaps? more likely wet legs if the showers find us out.
So here's what you've let yourselves in for:-
The walk starts from just outside Kirkby Lonsdale (where the coach normally parks) just above the Devil’s bridge on the east bank of the river.
We turn North East crossing Laitha Lane, then via Cragg House Farm to walk along Chapelhouse Lane. At a small cross-roads at Bees Nest we take the right hand turn to meet Wandales lane at a second crossroads.
Leaving the tarmac up the farm track to Langthwaite, we take the path on our left, passing through Hole House, Fell Garth, Whelprigg, Low Bank House and Underfell farms to arrive at Barbon.
Passing the church on our left we cross Barbon Beck then turn due east up Barbondale ascending to Blindbeck Bridge, from here we continue our ascent to arrive at Bullpot Farm. (1005 ft / 306 m).
We now take the potholers path past Bull Hole Of the Witches and various other potholes to cross over Leck Beck. NOTE, there is no bridge, well not in 2002!
We follow the path south-westerly along the beck past the waterfalls through Springs Wood to Leck Mill. Leaving Leck Mill via Leck, the old disused railway and across the A65 we make our last turn of the day, north-west from Overtown. Across the fields passing New House and Whoop Hall Hotel to recross the A65 on to Fleet’s lane. The end of Fleet’s lane puts us on Chapelhouse lane back to the coach.
Today's walk is a moderate one with one main ascent, about 210 m/ 690ft. Although it’s quite a long walk for December. A rare circular route too!
Assuming Sedbergh isn't required as a starting point, I propose we go directly to Kirkby Lonsdale. I see Peter intends to start his route from the M6/A65 junction so it won't interfere with his planned route. If the weather should turn really nasty we do have the option of shortening the walk. Still time to book on, seats available!
See you Sunday
John
24/11/2019 - STAVELEY

A Walk for 24th November 2019

BOWNESS - STAVELEY

Leader John Adams

Distance 13.7 miles / 22 km

Ascent (total) 1985 ft / 605 m

Descent (total) 1968 ft / 600 m

Time 6 hours

Sunset Time 15:58

Map OL7 - The English Lakes South-eastern area

Start Grid Ref SD501885


Hello everyone.
A little early to be certain about conditions on the day, I'll be putting my gaiters on anyway, as I expect there will be mud.
The walk is a little longer than usual for this time of year, however, there are options for shortening it should conditions underfoot or time dictate otherwise.
We leave the coach on the A591 at the lay-by just beyond Sizergh Castle. Taking the track up to Nether Wells farm, then on to Holeslack farm we eventually bring up on Brigsteer Rd.
Our route now takes up along the edge of Scout Scar to its far end passing the ‘Pepperpot’ view point on the way. Having crossed the lane we walk to the far end of Cunswick Scar then across the road above ‘Plumgarths’ making our way towards Bank End farm.
Having passed Bank End farm the route takes us across the busy A591 then heading downhill to Burneside train station. On leaving the station we turn right along the road to the junction, where we turn left heading out of Burneside. Upon reaching the next junction we take the right looking for Sprint bridge and a footpath just beyond it.
The footpath passes Sprint Mill following the river closely up to Gurnal bridge, here we cross over to commence our ascent, first passing Hill farm, Hill Fold and Larchbank to across Potter Fell road. We continue ascending as we make for Low Taggleshaw and Gurnal Dubs tarns, just above which is the highest point today (303 m/ 994 ft).
Our descent brings us firstly to Potter tarn then continues on to Frost Hole, here we take the track uphill to crossover a lane. Leaving the lane we make for the brow of the hill ahead and the edge of a woodland, after negotiating the fence into the woodland where we’ll follow the path around the hill to a steep path downhill.
At the bottom of the hill we cross Barley bridge and make our way into Staveley, some for the brewery and some for the coach.
Today's walk is a moderate one with two main ascents. The first is almost 180 m/ 600ft, the second just over 250 m/800 ft
Still seats available if you are interested! Send us a text to book on. (Club mobile No)
See you Sunday
John
10/11/2019 - ARNSIDE

A Walk for 10th November 2019

ARNSIDE

Leader John Adams

Distance 13.1 miles / 21.1 km

Ascent (total) 1450 ft / 442 m

Descent (total) 1460 ft / 445 m

Time 6 hours

Sunset Time 16:19

Map OL7 - The English Lakes South-eastern area

Start Grid Ref SD509721


Hello everyone,
Will we have a dry one? whatever, the hardy souls that make up our club will get out there anyway! So with the weather taken care of, what's in store for you this Sunday?
The walk commences at the roundabout at Pine Lake on the A6. The walk takes us along the River Keer, this takes us under the motorway over Kellet lane then across the fields to Capernwray.
At Capernwray we follow the canal towpath past Borwick until we arrive at Tewitfield and it's sad locks.
If we are able we'll to we'll cross under the motorway here (alternative route is available if not passable) then across the fields and railway towards Yealand Conyers over the other side of the A6.
We start our only ‘real’ ascent of the day now, walking up the lane past the old police station into the grounds of Yealand Manor to the crest of the hill, from here we can see a large part of our day’s walk stretching out ahead of us. We descend towards Leighton Hall which we pass on our left making for the ‘Moss’ and it’s bird watching hides. Unfortunately time dictates that we cannot stand and stare for too long, so on we go, crossing the lane to take the footpath on the right. We walk along a limestone gully which takes us into the ’Trough’ (a quarry frequented by local climbers).
At it's far end we climb out of the quarry (not difficult) then wend our way through the woods until we reach Hawes Water.
From Hawes Water we make for Elmslack via Waterslack, where we cross through the caravan park into the woods as we head for Arnside Tower.
Leaving the tower via the farm track to the farm entrance, crossing the road to the path opposite. We ascend between Heathwaite and Arnside Knott where the path divides in numerous directions.
We make for the hill called Heathwaite today, then our route passes downhill through Arnside Park Wood to the coast near New Barns. We now have the last section of the walk before us, namely a nice, easy level stroll along the River Kent estuary into Arnside itself.

Today’s walk is ‘easy’ with no major ascents. The highest point of the day is above Yealand Manor at 126m/413 ft. The only ascent of note is 96m/315 ft to above Yealand Manor. We pass alongside a river, a canal, through woodlands and to finish, the estuary.
I expect with the amount of rain that's been put down, most every field will be muddy. Gaiters, if you have them would be a good idea! If time or weather decides to slow us down, we do have the option to shorten the route. Still time for you to book on for the day, get in touch!
See you Sunday,
Regards
John
27/10/2019 - AMBLESIDE

A Walk for 27th October 2019

AMBLESIDE

Leader John Adams

Distance 10.3 miles / 16.6 km

Ascent (total) 1975 ft / 649m

Descent (total) 2326 ft / 765m

Time 5.5 hours

Sunset Time 16:47

Map OL7 - The English Lakes S.E. area

Start Grid Ref SD420987


Hello everyone,
It looks like we may have a reasonable day in store! Up to press. I thought we would tackle a walk which I think I have not done since 28th December 2003. One section, notably on the ascent (of course) is on a very faint/poor path which disappears part way over the rough ground. Once done its easy afterwards! almost all downhill.
The walk commences on the A591 and lane junction just before Windermere.
Walking up the lane for about 100m we pass through Common Wood either to the rear (or over the summit?) of Orrest Head to the lane near Causeway farm.
Turning right on the lane we take the path just beyond Near Orrest to cross over the fields to Moorhowe Rd. Turning right again we next take the Dubbs Rd (track) past Dubbs Reservoir to the Garburn Rd.
Now we drop down sharply into the Troutbeck valley bottom to the church via Limefit Park and the A592. From the A592 we take the path behind the church up toward High Green above Town Head.
Looking out for a narrow stony track on the right heading north, this leads upwards over rough ground between Dod Hill and our destination of Baystones. (487m/1598ft the highest point of the day) and a total ascent of 1190 ft from the valley bottom.
Next we walk northeast along the ridge passing Idle Hill. From the bottom of Idle Hill we descend west to the track above Stockghyll Beck. Following the track downhill we’ll arrive in Ambleside centre next to the Salutation Hotel.
The coach should be parked near the recycling centre by the river.
Today’s walk is moderate but it does have an ascent (over 1000 ft of it) over rough ground to the summit of Baystones. We have a couple of options along the route to shorten it in the event of bad conditions.
See you Sunday,
Regards
John
13/10/2019 - APPLEBY

A Walk for 13th October 2019

Appleby

Leader John Adams

Distance 12.5 miles / 20.1 km

Ascent (total) 1035 ft / 315m

Descent (total) 1368 ft / 417m

Time 5.5 to 6 hours

Sunset Time 18:16

Map OL19 - Howgill Fells & Upper Eden Valley

Start Grid Ref NY622082


Hello everyone,
I've been reading the missive posted by Peter, thanks are due for your most kind comments Peter, which are reciprocated wholeheartedly. (I wonder what happened to those SAS recruits?) (No; I'm not dashing off to Cross Fell by the way, but its an idea!) That said we're 15 years older and I'm still looking for more recruits.
We visited Appleby in 1999, 2004 and 2006. The weather is not looking too favourable at the moment, still there's time for it to get worse! Fortunately the area is fairly low lying (even the trig point on Knott hill is only 412m/1352 ft) so come what may we've got the gear to cope.
So on to the walk.
The walk commences at Orton just two miles north of Tebay.
After being dropped off in Orton, we find the path which takes us East out toward Sunbiggin farm via Street lane, Bland House, past the stone circle at Knott lane then Acres.
The bridleway takes us from Sunbiggin farm, over Little Kinmond ascending over limestone pavement, to descend into Great Asby passing Clockeld farm on the way. Look out for St Thomas’ well at the far end of the village.
We depart the village of Great Asby in a north-easterly direction passing Goodlie Hill farm via Kellybark lane and track. Leaving the track across the fields to the lane at Heights, then returning to the fields yet again brings us to Catharine Holme farm. Just beyond the old church we take the footpath to arrive on the side of Asby Beck.
Following the stream northwards past Rutter Mill with its mill pond and Rutter Force waterfall, the path continues along the banks of Hoff Beck.
Returning briefly to more tarmac we find ourselves on the doorstep of the New Inn pub at Hoff, assuming it’s still open? (It was closed when passing in recent years on the coach homeward)
The final stages of our walk are now upon us as we continue along the banks of Hoff Beck. We say farewell to the Hoff at Bandley Bridge, taking instead the bridleway across to the outskirts of Appleby.
The last leg takes us above the River Eden then down into Appleby itself.
Today’s walk is easy. We could decide to ascend to the Trig point on Knott (412m/1352ft). Watch out for slippery limestone on part of the route!
Still plenty of seats available, get in touch.
See you Sunday,
Regards
John
29/9/2019 - BRAITHWAITE

A Walk for 29th September 2019

BRAITHWAITE via M6

Leader John Adams

Distance 8 miles / 13 km

Ascent (total) 3,124 ft / 950m

Descent (total) 3884ft / 1184m

Time 5.5 hours

Sunset Time 18:54

Map OL4 - The English Lakes - North-Eastern Area

Start Grid Ref NY206244


Hello everyone,
Well it looks like we're in for some rain, after lunch looks a bit better but we'll see! The walk I've planned starts off fairly low then the big stuff for later, hopefully it'll not be too wet. If the weather takes a turn for the worse I have an alternative lower route we could try. Good news is, it's not very long!
The walk commences from the Whinlatter visitor centre entrance. (toilets anyone?)
We walk east 200m on the road to find the start of our first ascent for the day. We follow the tracks leading us steadily uphill through the Comb Plantation until reaching a track crossroads, here we go east.
We head for Whinlatter Top (525m/1722ft) our first of the day, still continuing along the wide ridge we’ll arrive at Brown How (517m/1697ft). On a bearing of 248 deg we plunge down to the forestry below, hopefully at a firebreak track which we’ll follow down to arrive back on the tarmac of the Whinlatter Pass road.
At a field gate on our left, we pass through/over it then across the valley bottom to commence our next ascent, 470m/1542ft of it. We follow the wall up onto the broad ridge that leads us to the summit of Ladyside Pike (703m/2306ft).
Next up is Hopegill Head (770m/2526ft) here we start the return leg of our day. The next summit is Grisedale Pike (791m/2595ft), today’s highest point, now starts the long STEEP downhill over Sleet How to arrive at Braithwaite to end our day. The coach should be parked on the other side of the A66 on the old main road.
This walk today is strenuous. Two main ascents, one over 200m/650ft and 440m/1450ft. Plus at least 1.5 miles of the route is off any path shown on the map. Are you still feeling adventurous?
See you Sunday,
John
15/9/2019 - ULVERSTON

A Walk for 15th September 2019

ULVERSTON from A5092, Grizebeck

Leader Graham Page

Distance 11 miles / 18 km

Ascent 1,650 ft / 500m

Time 6 to 6.5 hours

Sunset Time 19:27

Map OL6 The Englsh Lakes (South Western Area)

Start Grid Ref SD262848


It's many years since Wyre Ramblers last visited Ulverston, so it's new ground for many, at least with this club. After our last outing to the beauty of Buttermere and the surrounding fells, this could be a case of 'after the Lord Mayor's show'. Yet, while there are no high peaks, exposed ridges, or enchanting lakes in this neck of the woods, it is still good walking country.
For those who prefer to tackle something a little shorter and stay on the coach all the way to Ulverston, it is a good destination as it provides some obvious attractive walking opportunities and easy route finding on its own doorstep - with walks to the Hoad, down the canal, or along the coastal path southwards towards Bardsea and on to Birkrigg Common.
For those who decide to come on today's planned walk, it comprises two main sections. The first takes in two outlying lakeland fells (Great Burney and Blawith Knott). The second heads south along the Cumbrian Way, and then on to Hoad Hill, before finally descending to Ulverston.

Starting from the lay-by on the A5092 by the Woodland Fell road, we immediately begin the quite steep ascent of Great Burney (979 ft / 298m), our highest point of the day. Weather permitting, it provides excellent views northwards of the higher Lakeland fells, as well as over the Duddon Estuary. We then cross over Little Burney and descend to the common.
A narrow lane, a farm track and fell path then take us to Birch Bank, for a similar ascent of 500 ft to Blawith Knott (806 ft / 245m), another excellent viewpoint. En route, Lang Tarn, if we find it, shares the distinction with Foxes Tarn, Scafell, of being the smallest named tarn in Lakeland. The descent heads straight down to the Giants Grave, before crossing back to Crooked Birch, and then along good farm tracks to cross the A5092 at Gawthwaite.
The second section of the walk at first follows the Cumbrian Way south to the hamlet of Broughton Beck. Leaving the Way, we keep east of the beck, skirting Ben Cragg Hill, to Mansriggs, very briefly the B5281, and on through woodland to our third and final ascent of the day, Hoad Hill (436 ft / 133m), directly above Ulverston.
Hoad Hill is crowned by the commanding Hoad Monument, erected in 1850, a Grade II Listed Building, and Eddystone Lighthouse look-alike, although it has never had a functioning light. For those with any energy left, the tower if open, has 112 steps that can be climbed for an enhanced panorama of Morecambe Bay, the southern Lake District, and east to the Howgills and the Dales.
All that then remains, is to make a bee line straight down to Ulverston and the waiting pubs and coach. The coach will be parked opposite "The Kiosk" bus shelter and Library on Victoria Road, the other side of the A590, 5 mins walk from the town centre.
1/9/2019 - BUTTERMERE

A WALK for 1st September 2019

BUTTERMERE

Leader John Adams

Distance 10.6 miles /17.1 km

Ascent (total) 2100 ft / 640 m

Descent (total) 2460 ft / 750m m

Time 5.5 hours

Sunset Time 20:05

Map Explorer OL4 - The English Lakes - North-Eastern Area

Start Grid Ref NY158209


Hello everyone.
Seems like we've missed out on the good weather!! instead we have a rather miserable day in prospect. So I've opted for a mid level walk, (highest point 420m) one I've not done since 2004/8.
The walk commences from Lanthwaite Green.
Leaving the coach we pass alongside the farm then across a field into the woodlands. We descend via the woodland to the northern end of Crummock Water.
We’ll follow the path around the end of the lake until just beyond the Pump house where we’ll take the path off towards Loweswater.
Crossing the fields to a lane over Park Bridge, takes us past the Kirkstile Inn in Loweswater. We leave the lane down a track to Maggies Bridge and Watergate farm which brings us to Loweswater lake shore.
The path passes through the pleasant Holme Wood then through Hudson Place farm and across to the road. We soon leave the road to start our ascent for today through Miresyke farm onto the track below Askill Knott. (Now, from this point on there aren’t any official paths as we make for Darling Fell summit and beyond. Although I know local paths do exist from my previous visit.) (I suspect we may have some walls to negotiate too!!)
We now enter the open access land up to Askill Knott then continuing to climb to reach the summit of Darling Fell. (391m/1283ft) The next port of call is across the Crabtree Beck valley to a top called Bield (412m/1352ft) then over Low Fell (423m/1388ft) highest point today.
We recross the head of the little valley to collect the top of Loftbarrow then over to Sourfoot Fell, both around (350m/1148ft). Our intended route now passes over Smithy Fell (390m/1280ft) to the final summit today, Fellbarrow (416m/1365ft).
Leaving Fellbarrow we start our downhill to pick up a track which takes us on to a quiet lane. Following the lane down we arrive at Low Lorton where the ‘Local’ will hopefully supply our needs until the coach arrives.
This walk today is moderate, Two main ascents, one over 260m/850ft & 120m/400ft Plus at least 3.5 miles of the route is 'off' any path shown on the map, Do you feel adventurous?
See you Sunday,
John
18/8/2019 - HAWORTH

A WALK for 18th August 2019

Hebden Bridge to HAWORTH

Leader John Adams

Distance 12 miles /19.3 km

Ascent (total) 2245 ft / 684 m

Descent (total) 1685 ft / 514m m

Time 5.5 – 6.25 hours

Sunset Time 20:31

Maps Outdoor Leisure 21 - South Pennines

Start Grid Ref SD992271


Hello everyone.
Looks like another will it, won't it day? for Sunday. So I've put my planned route together and fingers crossed! My walk starts in Hebden Bridge, so I assume we'll be going there via Todmorden?
The walk commences at the bus stop on New Road (A646) next to the Hope Baptist church in Hebden Bridge.
We walk back up the main street over the bridge to Old Gate, here is where we start our first ascent of the day up the steep alleyway called the Buttress. On reaching the top onto Lee Wood Rd we turn north along the road until reaching the right hand lane that descends towards Upper Lee.
We now follow various footpaths through the woodlands paralleling Hebden Water below us. The paths take us up and down the valley sides before descending to the waterside opposite the old Gibson Mill and toilets.
Closely following the river until we arrive at a footbridge just above a weir, here we cross to the eastern side and walk along the waters edge up to the next footbridge below Blake Dean.
The next 2km/1.25 miles is on a good track up to and over the dam of Walshaw Lower Dean Reservoir. (Here we’ll join the Pennine Way up to Top Withins.)
Having crossed the dam we follow the eastern shoreline passing the dam of the middle reservoir, after about two thirds of its length we start the ascent (120m/395ft) over the moorland to arrive at Top Withins and it’s association to Wuthering Heights.
We leave the ruin and the ‘Way’ taking the path passing Forks House, on reaching Virginia farm we cross to the other side of the valley via the ‘Bronte Bridge’. Now on the ‘Millennium & Bronte Way’ we’ll follow the paths up and over Penistone Hill.
Crossing the lane into the walled track opposite leads us to the rear of St. Michaels church in Haworth. With its gruesome graveyard full of cholera victims, many of them young children.
Once on Main Street, the coach is in the car park off ‘Changegate’ alongside the Tourist Information Office. The rest of the village is down the hill, with its numerous opportunities to part with your money!
Today's walk is fairly strenuous, the first 12.5 km/ 7.8 miles is uphill. The remaining part is all (nearly) downhill of course. Parts of it will be mucky I expect. Especially over the moorland section.
See you Sunday,
John & Linda
4/8/2019 - KESWICK

A WALK for 4th August 2019

KESWICK

Leader John Adams

Distance 10 miles/16 km

Ascent (total) 2133 ft /650 m

Descent (total) 2330 ft /710 m

Time 5.5 - 6 hours

Sunset Time 21:08

Maps Explorer OL4 & OL5 - The English Lake District – North West & North East Areas

Start Grid Ref NY315248


Today’s walk starts on the A66, at the junction of the minor road to Castlerigg stone circle.
We set off down the lane over the River Greta and exit on the next corner into the fields. Eventually we’ll arrive at Yew Tree farm and another lane, this leads us uphill to the little church on the brow of the hill.
Here we leave the tarmac as we start our ascent over the High Rigg (357m/1171ft) ridge to arrive at the A591.
Turning left over the bridge then right on to the lane toward Thirlmere, we pass round Bridge End farm and over the stream via the footbridge through Smallthwaite farm to another lane. Almost immediately we leave the lane off to the left alongside the Pine plantation.
After about 1km/0.6 mile we take to the forest track on our left and start to ascend round the shoulder of the hill. On reaching a fork in the track we exit the plantation to the left, having crossed the footbridge we’ll see Goat Crag looming up above us.
Now we take to the ‘local path’ alongside the wall leading up the fellside, when we meet a gate in the wall we pass through and contour below and around Dodd Crag. On reaching the shoulder past Dodd Crag we’ll see our next destination below us, Walla Crag and the promise of an easy footpath. But first some rough grassy brackeny? ground!
The final part of the walk is easy through Rakefoot farm then the footpath through Springs Wood to Springs road. The road along the houses leads us to Ambleside road then down into Keswick itself.
Today’s walk is fairly strenuous. With a section (2.85k/1.77 miles) ‘off path’ on a ‘local path’ to contend with. There are two main ascents, 200m/656ft and off path 191m/626ft.
See you Sunday,
John
21/7/2019 - EDALE

A WALK for the 21st July 2019

EDALE

Leader John Adams

Distance 10 miles/16 km

Ascent (total) 1700 ft /516 m

Descent (total) 2255 ft /687 m

Time 5.5 - 6 hours

Sunset Time 21:20

Map Explorer OL1 - The Peak District - Dark Peak Area - East Sheet

Start Grid Ref SK103925


Hi everyone,
As usual keeping a watch on the weather, looks like we may be in for a dry one? Up to press anyway.
This walk is not as difficult as the Borrowdale trek a fortnight ago, but it has its moments!
It starts off easily enough, then a small river crossing? followed by a stretch of off piste ascent to the gritstone edge.
A steep descent off Ringing Roger into Edale to finish.
Today’s walk starts high on the A57 Snake pass road.
The actual start is below the main road alongside Lady Clough, which we’ll follow through the woodlands for about 4km/2.5 miles.
On reaching the end of Lady Clough we turn west up Ashop Clough, for about 800m/875yds looking out for Urchin Clough on the opposite side of the River Ashop.
Having negotiated the crossing (all dry hopefully!) we ascend along the western side of the Clough.
We’ll be able to see our destination ahead of us, Fairbrook Naze (619m/2031ft) an ascent of 270m/886ft from the river.
Having gained the high ground we keep it for the rest of the day, the intended route leads us all the way along the Gritstone edges right round to Ringing Roger our preferred descent point into Edale.
As we traverse along the edges we’ll come across numerous strangely sculpted rocks and formations, many of which are named, others you use your imagination to describe.
The descent from Ringing Roger is STEEP but on a good path, the viewpoint at the Nab is particularly good.
Once back on the almost level of Edale village, there’s The Old Nags Head pub which is the first to be able to supply your need for alcoholic refreshment.
Myself I’ll head for the coach on the south side of the railway line in the car park.
Then unbooted and de-rucsacked I’ll return under the railway bridge to the Rambler Inn pub!!
Today’s walk is fairly strenuous, with a section ‘off path’ to contend with. Plus a crossing over Ashop river. (footbridge about 1.25k/1 mile upstream) There is only one main ascent, 270m/886ft. The path along the edges is rocky but with great views!!
So there you have it. Still some seats available, get in touch.
See you Sunday,
John
7/7/2019 - BORROWDALE

A WALK for the 7th July 2019

BORROWDALE

Leader John Adams

Distance 10.6 miles/17 km

Ascent (total) 3510 ft /1070 m

Descent (total) 3507 ft /1069 m

Time 6.5 - 7 hours

Sunset Time 21:47

Map Explorer OL4 - The English Lakes - North Western Area

Start Grid Ref NY247137


Hello everyone,
Fingers crossed! Looks like we'll get a dry day at least. I've arranged parking and the bar (also tea!) at the Glaramara Hotel. The coach will be parked on their driveway, so nice and accessible to dump the rucsac and boots.
Today’s walk commences from the driveway of the Glaramara hotel. On the B5289 at Seatoller.
We take the lane heading towards Seathwaite, when we reach Seathwaite bridge, before crossing we take the path off the road on the right.
The path follows the course of the beck, ignoring the footbridge into Seathwaite and up the waterfalls, we continue along the path ahead.
We ascend across the fell to arrive at a Kissing gate hanging on a narrow shelf in the cliff. Beyond the gate is a somewhat tricky bit of hands on/scrambly path, which crosses above the drop off looking toward Taylorgil Force.
Once above the falls we follow the path up to Styhead Tarn, where we’ll have our first view of Great End (910m/2985ft) the days highest point. Ranked 5th highest in the Lakes.
Turning east the path passes below the massive bulk of Great End then passes Sprinkling Tarn to ascend into Esk Hause.
From Esk Hause we continue ascending into Calf Cove and its shelter.
Still on we climb until we reach an flattish open area, most people turn south west here making for Scafell Pike. We however turn north, taking a fairly easy ascent to arrive at our high point of Great End.
Now we retrace our steps back down to below Esk Hause, opposite is the summit of Allen Crags (785m/2575ft) This the first summit we cross over as we follow the Glaramara ridge path all the way down to eventually arrive back on the B5289. Turning left (westwards) we quickly arrive at the Hotel, coach and BAR!
Today’s walk is strenuous! There is only one main ascent, 810m/2657ft. starts at Seathwaite finishes on Great End! With a few level bits along the way. Plus the ups and downs over Glaramara.
So there you have it. Still some seats available, get in touch.
See you Sunday,
John & Linda
23/6/2019 - CONWAY

A WALK for the 23rd June 2019

CONWAY

Leader John Adams

Distance 9.9 miles/15.9 km

Ascent (total) 2820 ft /860 m

Descent (total) 2976 ft /907 m

Time 6 - 6.5 hours

Sunset Time 21:47

Map Explorer OL17 - Snowdonia – East Sheet

Start Grid Ref SH774719


Hello everyone,
Looks like a dry, dare I say maybe even sunny! day out to Conway. I've put a walk together which hopefully you'll enjoy (endure?) In the event the weather does the dirty on us we can omit three out of the four summits and stay lower down. This would also eliminate crossing the stream too! So read on!
Today’s walk commences just north of Ty’n-y Groes.
We set off along a track past a couple of houses into the fields, we reach Glyn uchaf (farm) then cross two more fields into Glyn Parc woodland. We descend to the lane at the foot of the woods and take the minor road opposite through Glyn Isa to Gwern Borten.
Once again on a lane we head west to a small crossroads, here we take the track ahead up toward the wooded hillside ahead. Entering the woodland sees us zig zagging steeply up to the top of the hill/woods. Still ascending we follow an old green lane to arrive at a little old church (Llangelynin) in the middle of nowhere?
Leaving the church in our wake we pass by Garnedd-Wen and Ty’n-y-Ffrid-Bach farms to the end of a small lane at Tyddyn-grasod farm. A further 20m/66ft brings us to the brow of the hill, the end of a 280m/920 ft ascent from the valley bottom at Gwern Borten.
Our route now takes us into the valley ahead to cross the Afon Gyrach stream (footbridge?) and start of the ascent to the Foey Lus (362m/1188ft) summit, views from here will be worth the effort. Today’s highest point.
So, down we go, all the way back down to the stream below the Fairy Glen, (footbridge?) then a steep ascent to acquire a footpath contouring the hillside across to Sychnant Pass.
Ahead you will see Alltwen (255m/8327ft) our next ascent, then descending toward the north we head for Penmaen-Bach (245m/804ft) both of these summits offer outstanding vistas.
Lastly we have Conway mountain, so we descend off Penmaen-bach to the east following a track into the dip between the hills.
Having surmounted the last summit today (244m/800ft) we make our way via the fields to Sychnant pass road, this road takes us to the castle wall where we descend into the car park to find our coach.
Boots off, shoes on, rucsac dumped! Off to the pub!!
Today’s walk is strenuous There are eight ascents overall, one is steep! with a steep descent before it. Also there may not be any footbridges across the stream
So see you Sunday,
Linda &John
Conway Route
9/6/2019 - GLENRIDDING

A WALK for the 9th June 2019

GLENRIDDING

Leader John Adams

Distance 8 miles / 13 km

Ascent (total) 3260ft / 994 m

Descent (total) 3260ft / 994 m

Time 6 hours

Sunset Time 21:45

Map Explorer OL5 - The English Lakes – North Eastern area – North Sheet

Start Grid Ref NY385169


Hello everyone,
Below is the walk I would like to do this coming Sunday!
As you'll be aware, what will decide the days activities is the weather. As yet its showing showers, but who knows? I'll be watching the forecasts closely.
I'll have an alternative if we're denied the summits on the day.
Today’s walk commences at the car park in Glenridding.
After crossing to the other side of Glenridding Beck we pass the shops then leave the beck to start the beginning of our first ascent.
On reaching Lanty’s tarn we descend to the wall, keeping the wall on our left we follow the path up Grisedale.
Before we reach Nethermost Cove Beck we leave the wide path to take a faint path above the beck.
The path will lead us round, behind and up to the top of Eagle Crag. (good scrambling to be had from the old workings too!)
From there you’ll be able to gaze up the narrow ridge that leads to the summit of Nethermost Pike (891m/2923ft) our destination!
Having attained the top we’ll stroll over to Helvellyn (950m/3117ft today's highest point) Hopefully the return leg over Striding Edge won’t be too busy.
We’ll take the paths downhill that will return us to Lanty’s tarn then retrace our steps back to Glenridding and the coach and pub.
Today’s walk is hard. You will need a good head for heights on the ridges. There is a lot of exposure going up and coming down! The rest is easy!
Linda will not be with me, as she will be entertaining our 3yr old granddaughter up from London. But I'll see you Sunday as usual. Regards,
John
26/5/2019 - BARNARD CASTLE

A WALK for the 26th May 2019

BARNARD CASTLE

Leader John Adams

Distance 11.8 miles / 19 km

Ascent (total) 1050ft / 320 m

Descent (total) 1460ft / 445 m

Time 5.5 hours

Sunset Time 21:30

Maps Explorer OL31 - The North Pennines – Teesdale & Weardale - Explorer OL304 – Darlington & Richmond

Start Grid Ref NY988135


Hello everyone,
Off to Barnard Castle, a place Linda and I have visited previously on occasion, but a first for the club. It looks like we'll be getting some rain too, at least at some point in the day. We currently have 27 booked on, so we definitely have room for a few more!
I've studied the maps for the area, and come up with a fairly easy walk (no hills worth mentioning!) Like Les I've opted for a riverside walk, albeit not the Tees, (well, a bit of it.)
Today’s walk commences at the bus stop on the A66 just before the A67 Barnard Castle exit. Leaving the coach we cross over the A66 via the bridge into the village of Bowes.
We pass along the ‘main’ street to its far end when we take the lane south to join the river Greta. We’ll be following the river all along its course until just short of it joining the river Tees. The route crosses many fields, and in and out of numerous woodlands along the way.
On the first part of the route we’ll pass five farms, West Low Fields, Mid Low Field, East Lowfields, Thackholme and Hundah to Rutherford lane.
The middle section of the route is again crossing fields, Moorhouse lane and woodlands until we reach Greta Bridge.
Crossing over the bridge the path is routed under the A66 back into the fields once more. The paths we follow will take us past Mortham wood to Mortham Tower, here we’ll join the route that some of our fellow walkers will be using.
Depending on time, we could elect to follow the path east to Whorlton bridge over the Tees then follow the river on its north bank to Barnard Castle. Or we can turn west along the river Tees south bank to Barnard Castle. whichever way we arrive at Barnard Castle we'll leave the river bank to ascend into the town.
It's well worth having a look around this pleasant little market town whilst you're there.
Today’s walk is fairly easy. Although there is over 1000 ft/320m of ascent, it is easy in nature. If we decide to add the extra distance via the north bank of the Tees, it will add 2.8 miles/4.6 km.
See you tomorrow
Regards,
John & Linda
12/5/2019 - CALDBECK

A WALK for the 12th May 2019

CALDBECK

Leader John Adams

Distance 11.8 miles / 19 km

Ascent (total) 2552ft / 778 m

Time 7 hours

Sunset Time 21:06

Maps Explorer OL5 & OL4 - The English Lakes - North Eastern & North Western Areas

Start Grid Ref NY345384


Hello everyone,
Having watched the forecasts carefully, it looks like we have yet another dry day in prospect! We need some more bottoms on seats this Sunday, so please let us know if you wish to book on. The next trip is to Barnard Castle (26th May) a new venue for the club. For those not out this Sunday and wishing to join us, please contact us.
Today’s walk commences at Howbeck just before Hesket Newmarket. Leaving the coach we set off gently uphill crossing the fields to Brackenriggs then on to the lane at Wood Hall.
We take the path from in front of Wood Hall ascending the fellside passing through the old mine workings on the way to the Summit of High Pike. (658m/2159ft) Our route now takes us briefly along the Cumbria as we make for today's highest point Knott (710m/2329ft)
Having gained the high point we can enjoy the views over toward the Scottish Borders as we continue our walk.
Now we make for the twin summits of Great & Little Sca fells below us, from these two we continue out to the summit cairn on Brae fell. Our route continues down the gentler fellside in a north-easterly direction until we reach the track into Fellside.
Leaving Fellside we cross the fields to Parkend on the B5299, taking to the tarmac will deliver us to Whelpo and then Beckside.
Leaving the comfort of the tarmac here, we cross over the river Cald beck and follow its flow downstream along its bank. Finally, we’ll pass through the curiously named ‘Howk’ to arrive in Caldbeck.
Today’s walk is fairly strenuous. A steady ascent (400m/ 1300ft) to High Pike. And a further 110m/360ft to Knott’s summit. Then a slow descent and easy finish into Caldbeck.
See you Sunday
Regards,
John & Linda
28/4/2019 - KETTLEWELL

A WALK for the 28th April 2019

KETTLEWELL

Leader John Adams

Distance 12.6 miles / 20.2 km

Ascent (total) 2300ft / 703 m

Time 7 hours

Sunset Time 20:34

Maps OL2 - OL30 The Yorkshire Dales - South & Western - Northern & Central Areas

Start Grid Ref SD988633


Hello everyone,
Looks like we've missed the good weather window! but at least for the moment the forecast looks to stay dry. The walk I'm planning is the one we did in 2011, it has the option of being shortened in the event of deteriorating conditions. We have a very poor turnout this trip, as yet we only have 18 booked on!! I'm rather hoping that we'll get a couple more booking on last minute. I would also ask for anyone wishing to go on the Caldbeck trip to please text the club mobile (only 6 booked as yet). Or e-mail us of course. So, on to the walk.
The walk commences just before the little village of Threshfield on the B6265.
We cross three fields to Skirethorns where we take to the lane for a short distance. Taking the track/entrance through the caravan/camping site we pass through woodlands past Height House. Here the land becomes more open as we cross over typical dales countryside, our meanderings eventually deposit us at Conistone Bridge.
Crossing over the River Wharfe then through Conistone village we squeeze our way up the narrow defile called Conistone ‘Dib’ This is the start of our main ascent today, having negotiated the ‘Dib’ we continue ascending steadily firstly via Bycliffe road into Conistone Turf road.
We find ourselves on a level path along a natural feature of the landscape, not for long though! To our right rises the hill which beckons us up to the heights beyond, called Sweet Hill via Hill End.
Standing on the top of Sweet Hill we can see not far ahead of us our destination, Great Whernside (today's highest point 704m/2310 ft) The summit trig point is surrounded by gritstone rocks making it an easy place to identify.
Well, its all down from here to Kettlewell (500m/1650 ft below) as we take the obvious path down the hillside to Hag Dyke farm. At the farm we branch off to the left into the narrow confines of Dowber Gill, keep an eye out for the entrance to Providence pot situated in the middle of the streambed! Have a look down it and wonder how the hell they get down there?
So on we go down, down, down until at last we find ourselves at the top of the village. A chance for you to have a look at the upper reaches of Kettlewell as we walk down to the village centre, We’ll find the coach parked near the river in the small car park.
We cover a variety of terrain today, mainly easy grades. The worst part is the ascent to Sweet Hill, there is no path shown across the moorland. If the weather turns out to be wet, be aware that the limestone can be very treacherous.
Still time to book on! we certainly need some more to come along.
See you Sunday

Regards,
John & Linda
31/3/2019 - ASKHAM

A WALK for the 31st March 2019

ASKHAM near Penrith

Leader John Adams

Distance 14.7 miles / 23.6 km

Ascent (total) 1132 ft / 345m

Descent (total) 1312 ft / 400m

Time 7 hours

Sunset Time 19:19

Map OL7 - The English Lakes North-eastern Area

Start Grid Ref NY605062


Hello everyone,
It would seem we'll lose this nice bit of weather before Sunday, however it is projected to stay dry? Hmmmm.
So as I intimated last time out, I've decided to go for the long walk the details are below.
It is not a technical walk (that's reserved for the Langdales!) but it is somewhat longer than we're used to.
Sad to say Peter has been called upon to work (not completely unexpected being as it's Mothering Sunday)
Thankfully Graham has put together a very good walk for the day, I'm sure the B group will have an excellent time.
We start the day at the Tebay Motorway Services. We exit via the service road onto a quiet lane, we turn left over the railway bridge to find our first footpath sign about 200m beyond.
We cross four fields to the Steps farm track, this places us on another quiet lane which delivers us to Scout Green hamlet. Here is where we start to follow Birk Beck upstream for about 4.5km/2.8 miles, almost to its source.
Our next path ultimately brings us to the Shap Quarry, firstly we pass through Salterwath farm then Shap Wells Hotel grounds. Needless to say there are around a dozen fields of various sizes and consistency as well to negotiate included in the above section. Once through the Shap Quarry works onto the A6 we turn right (north) to just beyond the ponds on our left.
There is our next path, which crosses open country to follow the infant River Lowther to Keld. Leaving Keld we pass round a low hill to above Shap Abbey on the opposite side of the river.
Our route continues across country to arrive in Rosgill, crossing the road we immediately leave Rosgill returning to the fields yet again. Next place on our route is Bampton Grange (we usually lunch here in the Church grounds) we’ll use the road bridge to cross over the river here.
We leave the road after we cross the Haweswater Beck bridge taking to the path right alongside the river Lowther. Not long afterwards we come across a small suspension footbridge taking us back over the river and up to the lane near Knipe Hall.
We leave the lane on a corner to cross the fields into the tiny hamlet of Whale. Whale is soon behind us as we start the final section of todays walk, across Low Deer Park along a very good track into the woodlands at its far end. In the woodland we’ll take the lower track which will bring us to Askham bridge, right at the bottom of Askham itself.
All that remains is to seek out the coach and the other members in whichever pub they have installed themselves!
This walk today is fairly easy! Albeit a l-o-n-g one! We’ll ascend more than 1100 ft / 340 m over of the day, but nothing significant on route.
See you Sunday

Don't forget the clocks go forward one hour!

Will you be the one who misses the coach?
Regards,
John
17/3/2019 - HAWKSHEAD

A WALK for the 17th March 2019

HAWKSHEAD via Newby Bridge

Leader John Adams

Distance 10 miles / 16.1 km

Ascent (total) 2070 ft / 631m

Descent (total) 2005 ft / 611m

Time 5.5 hours

Sunset Time 18:19

Map OL7 - The English Lakes South-eastern Area

Start Grid Ref SD373898


Hello everyone,
Will we get a dry one? after the last fortnight of atrocious weather it would seem that we'd have no chance! But, if the forecast is to be believed, it may stay dry on Sunday; albeit very windy.
Fortunately the area we're rolling around is of a fairly low elevation. (I wonder if it will be less windy than they say, like it was at Sedbergh two weeks ago?)
Sadly, Peter has once again been called in to work this Sunday. I don't know if he's drafted out a walk at the time of mailing this out. I will be contacting him to find out.
So as yet we have no official B walk leader, although I'm confident that between you all, and a couple of volunteers you'll sort that out as you did on the previous occasion.
The walk is one we did in November 2014.
We start the day outside the YMCA on the Hawkshead road. Right opposite the YMCA entrance is our path leading uphill for 140m/460ft! to the top of Stott Park Heights.
Having passed over Stott Park we make our way to High Dam a very picturesque tarn hidden in the Woodlands. We walk almost all the way round to the far side of the tarn on the path which leads us downhill to the hamlet of Crosslands.
After Crosslands we pass St Pauls church in Rusland then over Stony Hazel and its woods to Force Forge farm and Mill. Turning right on the lane we take to a forest track (one of many to come!) which we follow up a narrow valley to pass an unnamed tarn. We join yet another track which takes us northerly along the edge of the woods with the village of Satterthwaite off to our right across the fields.
You’ve probably guessed by now that we’re deep into Grizedale forest with its numerous and bewildering forest tracks. Continuing northerly along yet more tracks; we pass Grizedale (again off to the right) until we reach the junction of two tracks and Grizedale Beck.
Here we depart the tracks (for a while only) as we follow the path round Guinea Hill passing yet another smaller unnamed tarn. On leaving the tarn the ground begins its long descent to Hawkshead, sure enough not long after the tarn we rejoin another forest track which takes right to the edge of Low Park Wood.
The final leg today is to continue downhill passing the Vicarage into the village of Hawkshead. The coach will be found in the main car park, toilets here too!
This walk today is fairly easy! with three main ascents of note. First 140m/460ft, the second ascent around 150m/490ft the last 146m/480ft. But will we get lost in Grizedale?
We still have quite a few seats empty, so get in touch and book on! See you Sunday
Regards,
John
3/3/2019 - SEDBURGH

A WALK for the 3rd March 2019

SEDBURGH via Tebay

Leader John Adams

Distance 10.75 miles / 17.8 km

Ascent (total) 3337 ft / 1017m

Descent (total) 3543 ft / 1080

Time 7 hours

Sunset Time 17:50

Map OL19 - The Howgill Fells.

Start Grid Ref NY617048


Hello everyone,
Looks like we missed the good weather window! Nowt new there then! still it promises to be a dry morning but probably showery in the afternoon.
I've decided to retrace a walk that we last did in February 2011. Starting in Tebay and finishing in Sedbergh, the details are below.
The walk has escapes in the event of rotten weather catching us out, and that is off to the west via one of the numerous ridges or valleys to the river Lune then south to Sedbergh.
The walk commences from the roundabout at Tebay on the A685.
We start out walking toward the youth hostel in the village, here we leave the road and take to the track which leads us steadily uphill.
(Part of this ascent is off any path and may cover some rough ground)
As we ascend we’ll pass over Powson Knott to reach the summit of Blease Fell (474m\1555 ft). We’ll have an outstanding view of the M6 some 270m/880ft below.
Across the valley will be seen our next ascent, ultimately Fell Head (623m\2044 ft) first though we have to plunge STEEPLY downhill to Carlin Beck 300m/985ft far below us. A descent without the comfort of a path to guide us down!
We’ll descend via Grains Gill to Carling Gill bridge or directly across the Beck depending on its depth and flow! Then we begin our ascent (450m/1470ft) via ‘Back Balk’ and ‘Knowles’ to Fell Head. (623m/2044ft) We now walk along a quite narrow airy (again great views) ridge across to ‘Breaks Head’.
Here we turn our faces towards today's highest point the Calf (676m\2218 ft) but first we pass over ‘Windscarth Wyke’, ‘Bush Howe’, ‘Height of Bush Howe’ then over ‘White Fell Head’ before reaching the ‘Calf’. Well you’ll be pleased to know, its pretty much all downhill from here.
The path is very easy to follow and leads us down via Calders past Arant Haw before plunging down Settlebeck Gill into Sedbergh.
Today’s walk is ‘STRENUOUS’ it has an slow (275m\900 ft) climb to start it off. A Steep descent of 300m/985ft - no path here either! Then a long STEEP ascent (450m\1470 ft) along the wide ridge to Fell Head. The walk becomes ‘easier’ toward the Calf, with the inevitable long descent into Sedbergh to finish.
We have quite a good turnout this Sunday, we've still got some seats left, so give us a ring or text us and get yourself booked on!
See you Sunday
Regards,
John
17/2/2019 - CONISTON

A WALK for the 17th February 2019

CONISTON via Ambleside

Leader John Adams

Distance 8.4 miles / 13.5 km

Ascent (total) 3497 ft / 1066m

Descent (total) 3622 ft / 1104m

Time 6.5 hours

Sunset Time 17:24

Maps OL6 & OL7 - The English Lakes - South Western & South Eastern Areas

Start Grid Ref SD312996


Hello everyone,
Sadly, we'll not be enjoying the sun on our day out, not like today anyway (Friday). Although Sundays forecast is a 'dryish' one (up to press that is)
The walk I have planned is not a particularly long one, however we do have quite a bit of ascent over the day!
We do have a number of cut off points however if the weather is unkind, or we run out of time?
If conditions are unfavourable to do Steel Edge we'll ascend via Wetherlam Edge instead.
We depart the coach at the little lane leading up into Tilberthwaite, we’ll walk up the lane until we reach Tilberthwaite Gill.
Having ascended the gill alongside Yewdale Beck we are presented with the Eastern flank of Wetherlam looming before us.
I propose to ascend to it’s summit via Steel Edge, so it should make for an interesting start to the day!
Wetherlam summit attained (762m/2500ft), next we're off up Prison Band to Swirl How (802m/2631ft).
Well you’ll be glad to hear we’ve only got 111m/365ft up to Brim Fell summit, then it’s easy walking round to the last top of the day namely Coniston Old Man (803m2634ft).
We’ll descend from here off the southern flank onto the Walna Scar Rd.
This will bring us (passing the Sun pub) into Coniston where we’ll find the coach parked at the school on Lake Rd.
Today’s walk is a strenuous one. We’ll have a quite severe ascent up Steel Edge. Then over Wetherlam and round to Coniston Old Man via Swirl How. Not a long walk today but lots of ascent!
Quite a good turnout this Sunday, although sadly Peter has to work! We still have some seats left if you wish to join us.
Regards,
John
3/2/2019 - INGLETON

A WALK for the 3rd February 2019

INGLETON via Clapham

Leader John Adams

Distance 8.5 miles / 13.7 km

Ascent (total) 2526 ft / 770m

Descent (total) 2628 ft / 801m

Time 6 hours

Sunset Time 16:54

Map OL2 Yorkshire Dales - Southern & Western areas

Start Grid Ref SD744691


Hello everyone,
Having looked at the various routes we've travelled over the years, I decided on the walk we did in January 2014.
Looking at the weather forecast, it promises to be dry but a distinct possibility of snow about 3 or 4pm! On top of what is presumably already down?
It may be that the route down toward Chapel Le Dale will be too treacherous to descend, if so, we'll retreat back to the summit, there we'll decide an alternative route off.
Looking at the Clapham website (yes they have one!) I noted that the charge for the lakeside path was £1 for adults in 2018.
The walk starts at Clapham village. We walk alongside the stream running the length of the village up to the entrance of the lakeside walk. If the entrance charge is not too exorbitant we may go through, however we’ll more likely take to the footpath off to the left up Clapdale Lane.
On attaining the footpath into the upper valley floor we come to the Ingleborough show cave, where for a fee you can explore the wonders of the Limestone system (well worth a visit, though sadly, not today).
Leaving the cave we continue along the slowly rising valley up to the fork at the end, taking the left fork brings us into the spectacular Trow Gill (a collapsed cave). Be warned, the Limestone is very treacherous when wet.
Climbing out of the far end of the Gill we follow the winding stony path along the wall until we reach the ladder stile. Over the stile brings us very near Bar Pot, a smaller version of Gaping Gill.
Next up is Gaping Gill (105m/345ft deep) one of the country's deepest single plunge caves, so if you venture near to gaze down please exercise extreme caution. Well, after the wonders of the caves we now face the fairly onerous slog up to the summit of Ingleborough (724m/2375ft) the highest point today.
From the summit we do not take the path directly toward Ingleton (that would be too easy, wouldn’t it?). Instead we return to the path down toward Chapel Le Dale, which we’ll follow steeply downwards.
Before reaching the Hamlet we turn towards Ingleton. We’ll walk along a grassy shelf between two small escarpments all the way back, high above the road to pick up the track from Crina Bottom. (this is the off path section) We’ll cross the B6255 onto a small lane, this will take us down to the river at the back of Ingleton village. Once in the village you will find the coach in the car park on the old viaduct.
Be aware that parts of the walk today are potentially dangerous. And as a final bonus, at least 3 miles are off paths. However, this should present no real difficulties. Assuming conditions underfoot aren't difficult.
As Peter mentioned, hats and gloves are essential. I intend to take my ski goggles just in case of spindrift!
Regards,
John
20/1/2019 - GRASMERE

A WALK for the 20th January 2019

GRASMERE

Leader John Adams

Distance 8.7 miles / 13.9 km

Ascent (total) 2336 ft / 712m

Time 5.5 hours

Sunset Time 16:27

Maps Explorer OL6 and OL7 - The English Lakes, South Eastern and South Western areas

Start Grid Ref NY339072


Hello everyone,
I've been watching the forecasts keenly to try and get an idea as to what we'll be having to deal with on the day. Needless to say its all over the place, January don't you know?
So the walk planned is an attempt to deal with most of the conditions. It has the advantage of a few cut off points if the weather turns really nasty! We last did this walk in March 2013.
The walk commences from the Grasmere car park.
Leaving the coach we walk up the Easedale road toward the Easdale Valley, however unlike our usual route we turn right after Goody bridge to walk along the lane until we reach Helmside. (around 3km/1.9mile)
From Helmside we ascend the imposing flank of Steele Fell (553m/1814ft) rising away in front of us.
Leaving the summit we'll head off towards the distant bulk of High Raise over Brownrigg Moss to the base of Broadstone Head.
We climb up Broadstone until we reach a small tarn, more a small puddle really! Here we take our leave of the path to cross the open ground to pass above Fernhill Crag.
Still descending we arrive at Tarn Crag with its extensive views of Easedale Tarn way below. From Tarn Crag we descend via Greathead Crag to the stream above Sourmilk waterfalls. Crossing the stream we pass alongside the falls to the Easedale valley floor.
On reaching the end of the valley we cross over Easdale Beck onto the lane, which returns us to Grasmere and the coach in the car park.
The walk is both easy and difficult today. The easy bits are at the start & the end. We have two climbs of note, the first up Steel Fell, the first bit 462m/1516ft then the second a mere 87m/285ft Before a rather steepish descent to Sourmilk Falls.
A good turnout so far for Grasmere! 43 on board so far, still room for a few (6 or 7) more though.
See you Sunday.
Regards,
John
6/1/2019 - CARTMEL

A WALK for the 6th January 2019

CARTMEL

Leader John Adams

Distance 11.6 miles / 18.6 km

Ascent (total) 1450 ft / 441m

Time 5.5 hours

Sunset Time 16:05

Map Explorer OL7 - The English Lakes, South Eastern Area

Start Grid Ref SD439823


Hello everyone,
Another year! Happy New Year to you all. We hope you've all enjoyed your month off and had a really good time.
We'll need to be leaving Cartmel around 15:30 - 16:00 as it will take at least an hour get to Garstang (traffic permitting). The meal is all arranged and will be ready for us to enjoy when we arrive.
The walk I have planned shouldn't tax any of us particularly, so an easy start to 2019. It's a variation on the 2016 walk.
Disembarking from the coach on the A590 opposite Cat Crag farm. Taking great care whilst crossing the busy A590 to avoid damaging any fast moving cars! We’ll arrive at the footpath which starts our days exploration. So through the small woodland, then across what will probably be damp low lying fields into a part of Nicholas Moss woods. Turning north we pass behind Halecat gardens into the far end of the woodland then turning west to Slate Hill farm. Taking the farm track to the road, then a short stretch of the tarmac delivers us to the footpath along the valley floor. Our path then heads westwards over the river Winster through Cow Head wood. We then cross a lane then yet more woodlands whilst ascending to Height road. Another brief bit of tarmac bashing brings us to the next westerly footpath passing over the shoulder of Barrow Wife hill to a good track. The track ends at the old A590 near Ayside, we cross the bridge over the new A590 to reach Ayside then westwards (again) to Seattle farm. Now we turn South through High Cark hamlet to follow the track past Sturdy’s to yet another lane. We soon leave the lane when we spy the next path on our right which leads us to Beck Side. Taking the westerly lane out of Beck Side brings us to the track through Wall Nook farm and Well Knowe. A very brief section down the lane finds the final path today, taking us through Park wood and straight across the race course into Cartmel.
This is a ‘long’ low level walk with a few minor ascents, however it is not a difficult walk. Be aware we may not finish the day with time to spare!

2018

9/12/2018 - STAVELEY

A WALK for the 9th December 2018

STAVELEY

Leader John Adams

Distance 10.9 miles / 17.5 km

Ascent (total) 1800ft / 549m

Time 6 hours

Sunset Time 15:47

Map Outdoor Leisure 7 - The English Lakes, South Eastern Area

Start Grid Ref SD501886


Hello everyone
It looks like we may have a reasonable day, but sadly a windy one!
I've decided to re-visit a route we last did in November 2015, its a fairly low level route thus avoiding any low cloud base and hopefully the worst of the wind.
We'll be departing the coach near Sizergh. If the weather takes a turn for the worse there is the option along the route to shorten it.
I've put a map with the route below.
We leave the coach on the A591 at the lay-by just beyond Sizergh Castle.
Taking the track up to Nether Wells farm, then on to Holeslack farm we eventually bring up on Brigsteer Rd.
Our route now takes up along the first part of Scout Scar to the cairn high above Barrowfield farm.
The path now leads us steeply down, passing through Barrowfield farm into Barrowfield Lot (woodland) and on to Garth Row lane.
We quickly cross the fields to Tullythwaite house on Thorns lane, the tarmac takes us on to Chapel Bridge. At Chapel Bridge we take the footpath near the bridge across to ‘The Broom’ (a cottage).
After walking through ‘The Broom’ then crossing another lane we continue uphill past Mountjoy wood across a quite wide expanse of open ground to Low Fold farm.
The path continues on past Low Fold on its way to High House, just before High House we turn right down a track to Brow Head.
Turning right on the lane we take the next track on our left at Milldam, we follow this winding track to Spigot House.
Taking to the path uphill to ‘The Howe’ we cross over the B5284 at ‘Sunnybrow’ to continue along the path past Boxtree farm to Yew tree farm.
Taking the northerly path out of the farm we cross various fields to the lane which is on the ‘Dales Way’
We stay on the ‘Way’ from here, the route will bring us into Staveley where we’ll await the coach on its return journey.
Today's walk is a moderate one with at least four ascents, none of which are over 300ft. But over the day they add up to 1300 ft!
Staveley Route
25/11/2018 - CHIPPING

A WALK for the 25th November 2018

CHIPPING

Leader John Adams

Distance 11.2 miles / 18 km

Ascent (total) 1200ft / 365m

Time 5½ hours

Sunset Time 15:59

Map Outdoor Leisure 41 - Forest of Bowland – West Sheet

Start Grid Ref SD511408


Hello everyone
I'm lead to believe that Sunday is likely to be a dry day? That's what the BBC is saying at present. We'll see!
The walk I have planned is quite a long one for this time of year, however because we'll be off the coach about 8:45ish we'll have more time to trudge.
I intend to tell everyone on board what my walk will be before we depart the River Wyre pickup.
This will save time, because my walk board will not have made it around the coach before we arrive at the start of the walk.
Those who wish to join me will then be ready when we arrive at the start point, hopefully!
You'll find attached, the intended route.
So here it be ...
The walk commences at the bus stop near Barton Grange Garden centre on the A6.
We quickly leave the A6 behind to cross over the main NW railway onto the path following the River Brock.
Passing under the M6 we then cross a footbridge onto a tarmac road to Brock Side. We continue following the river passing Walmsley bridge then through Brock Bottom (a favourite spot of many families visiting the countryside).
Still following the river we pass the weir and arrive at Snape Rake Lane, here we can ascend the rough track to the next footpath along the lane or we can continue along the riverbank.
Either choice takes us past the Scouts outdoor centre at Waddecar, shortly afterwards we’ll leave the river behind taking a path off to the right up a small side valley and Gill Barn wood. The path takes us across a couple of fields then through Wickens Barn onto a lane, turning right we’ll walk towards to the very obvious hill that is Beacon Fell.
After a brief walk on the lane we take the farm track towards Sagar’s farm then ascend to the lane that circumnavigates the hilltop. Crossing the lane we ascend through the trees to Beacon Fell summit (266m/873ft) Heading east we pass through a car park then crossing the lane again making for Broadhead then Wood Acre back onto tarmac. Continuing eastwards we cross numerous fields and Collins Hill lane to return to tarmac at Old Hive.
Turning right we follow the lane into Chipping itself, hopefully the coach will be somewhere near the church car parking area.
Today's walk is fairly easy, although probably muddy! A low-level walk with an ascent up to Beacon Fell summit.
Regards
John
Chipping Route
11/11/2018 - CLITHEROE

A WALK for the 11th November 2018

AMBLESIDE

Leader John Adams

Distance 9 miles / 14.5km

Ascent (total) 1900ft / 580m

Time 5 hours

Sunset Time 16:18

Map Outdoor Leisure 5 English Lakes - South Eastern Area

Start Grid Ref NY372040


Hello everyone
Like Peter I've been weather watching, and it seems that we may be lucky and keep dry! however maybe not!!
Being as we are now into our shorter days, the walk reflects that in that its shorter and lower.
I'll also be sending round the Christmas menu, for those of you would like to join us - it happens on the 6th January 2019 after our day out at Cartmel.
The menu will be available to peruse for the following two trips, below the B Walk description, and probably on the Wyre Ramblers Facebook pages??
Send your requirements to me, either by text or e mail if you can't make any of the last trips out and would like to be included.
My walk is similar in nature to Peters albeit the wrong way round?
The walk commences at the recycling centre and bus park, near Rothay bridge Ambleside.
On leaving the coach we’ll pass through Rothay Park to emerge on the A591 going toward Grasmere.
We’ll exit the A591 at Scandale bridge into Rydal Park taking the track round to Rydal Hall.
After passing the hall we take the old corpse path below Nab Scar toward Grasmere.
Taking the first path off to the left, we head down to the river (crossing the A591 first) across the footbridge and then up to Loughrigg Terrace.
When we reach the lane at the far end of the terrace we take to the path immediately opposite into Redbank woods.
Keeping an eye out for the permissive path uphill on our left, we’ll ascend it to find ourselves behind Huntingstile Crag.
We turn south east toward High Close Youth Hostel, which we’ll pass through delivering us to the lane behind it.
After about 400m/yds we take to the path again on our left, shortly afterwards we take a ‘steep’ and rough path directly to Loughrigg summit (335m/1100ft) today’s high point.
The path we choose from the summit takes us generally south east, heading toward Black Mire. We continue on our previous heading making for Lily Tarn and the viewpoint above it.
Lastly we’ll descend via the fairly steep path to arrive on the A593 at Clappersgate, from here its an easy stroll back to Rothay bridge and the coach.
Having divested yourselves of your rucsacks and boots, its off in to the town!
Today's walk is fairly easy. A mid-level walk with a tricky ascent up to Loughrigg summit via a gully path.
See you tomorrow. A very good turn out too, over 40 booked on!!
Regards
John
28/10/2018 - CLITHEROE

A WALK for the 28th October 2018

CLITHEROE – Pendle Hil

Leader John Adams

Distance 11.5 miles / 18.5km

Ascent (total) 1830ft / 557m

Time 6 hours

Sunset Time 16:44

Map Explorer OL41 - The Forest of Bowland - Western Sheet

Start Grid Ref SD747416


Hello everyone
This coming Sunday looks to have a favourable forecast, dry! SUNNY! but cold. As Peter posted, bring your hats and gloves, just in case.
I've attempted to find a slight variant on the usual routes up and over Pendle Hill, whether I've succeeded will be decided by yourselves at the end of the day.
Linda, sadly will not be joining us this time. She's mad as hell! but hopes we all have a good day.
So have a look below....
The walk commences on Shawbridge Rd. into Clitheroe.
The path is immediately opposite where we leave the coach, and it takes us behind some buildings heading east. We’ll see the rising bulk of Pendle hill ahead of us across the fields, perhaps the Scout stone? which is where we’ll arrive at the top of our ascent. But before that we cross half a dozen fields to the A59 (take great care crossing this busy road!!) then perhaps another half dozen fields to arrive at Little Mearley Hall. I hope to pass through the farm and follow a track through Little Mearley wood then the ‘steeply’ rising gulley to the aforementioned Scout stone. Once on the top we head off in search of the trig point at Big End (557m/1827ft) today’s highest point.
On leaving the top we head north to descend ‘steeply’ off the hill towards Lane Head passing Hookcliffe plantation. Crossing the lane we follow the path past Clay House farm then into Downham village (there are toilets here as well as an ice cream shop!) Leaving the village we take the paths passing Cat Gallows & Longlands woods to Worsaw End & Worsaw House. Turning north west we take the path to Chatburn, once again we negotiate the busy A59 on the way to it. Having arrived in Chatburn safe & sound we turn west along Bridge road then onto Chatburn Old Rd.
At the far end of the road we take the footpath off to the left through the trees and fields until we find ourselves on the ‘Ribble Way’ path along the riverside. When we reach Bradford bridge we take to the tarmac briefly to reach the entrance to the Sculpture Park and woodland. Once through the park, again onto tarmac briefly, we’ll take another path across two fields into the houses on Kirkmoor Rd. All that remains is to walk along the road to the station then using the underpass to gain access to Railway View Rd opposite (Coach here?) then seek out a pub to rest your feet!
Today’s walk is moderate to easy. An easy walk across to the ‘Hill’ but then a STEEP ascent and descent after which the walk returns to a fairly leisurely one into Clitheroe.
Still seats available, so get in touch.
See you Sunday
John
14/10/2018 - KESWICK

A WALK for the 14th October 2018

KESWICK via Lakes

Leader John Adams

Distance 8.5 miles / 13.7 km

Ascent (total) 3277ft / 999m

Time 5½ hours

Sunset Time 18:17

Map Outdoor Leisure 5 English Lakes - North Eastern Area

Start Grid Ref NY235297


Hello everyone
Although the weather today is lovely!!? Tomorrow is looking much better.
Sadly yet again Peter cannot be out with us, so we're looking for volunteers to lead the B group!
I've decided to have a go at Helvellyn and the Dodds out to Threlkeld.
I do have an alternative low level route if the weather decides to b***er us about.
So here's the details.
The walk commences at the Ravenstone Manor Hotel on the A591 toward Bassenthwaite.
We’ll find the start path just to the south of the driveway to the hotel. The path ascends very steeply to join the easier path up on to the shoulder of Ullock Pike. (2263ft/689m)
Following on along this fine ridge walk next up is Longside Edge (2408ft/734m). Ahead of us is a dip before ascending to the Broad summit of Carlside (2447ft/746m)
Today we decline the ascent across the scree to Skiddaw, instead we descend steeply to the south looking down to our next port of call ‘Dodd’ (1647ft/502m)
On finally reaching the forestry track we’ll follow its winding way the summit, considering its lowly height there are extensive views to be enjoyed here.
We retrace our steps to pass where we joined the track earlier as we continue following the forestry tracks downward. Taking a right hand track leads us below Hounslow Bank into Lizzick wood, the track dwindles to a faint path through to the eastern edge of the woodland.
Our faint path deposits us on the lane passing through Applethwaite into Ormathwaite. Taking the lane toward the A591 we leave it partway down to cross the fields to arrive on Spooneygreen lane.
Passing over the A66 we turn east on the road pass behind Keswick swimming baths then finish into the town centre.
Today's walk is fairly STRENUOUS.
A mid-level walk with a fine ridge walk to the summit of Carlside. Then a steep descent to Dodd, before returning to Keswick.
See you tomorrow then.
We have a good turnout but there are still seats available, time to book yourselves on then!! Regards
John & Linda
30/9/2018 - RAMSBOTTOM

A WALK for the 30th September 2018

RAMSBOTTOM

Leader John Adams

Distance 9.5 miles / 15km

Ascent (total) 1100ft / 335m

Time 5½ hours

Sunset Time 18:49

Map Explorer - West Pennine Moors

Start Grid Ref SO709254


Hello everyone
I'm early with the walk for a change, got no idea what the weather will throw at us on the day. If it turns nasty I'll have an alternative route up my sleeve! So a new venue for the club, Ramsbottom, can't say I've ever ventured that way. Although Linda and I have visited some of the other towers/monuments around the area i.e. Darwen tower etc. Les has asked me to post a walk he's got planned for the day too, it looks very interesting. We've not heard from Peter as yet so no idea if he will with us? Lets hope so, it'll be nice to have you under the cosh again Peter! My walk is a fairly easy one, although I'm off any official paths for most of the day!! so could be interesting and possibly wet and muddy?

First here's Les's walk...
Hi, attached is something I'm thinking of as an alternative to yours and Peter's walks.
Plan 'A'
If the coach gets to Ramsbottom in time for us to catch the 9.47 steam train to Rawtenstall we will alight and purchase a one way ticket (£5 to £6). On arrival at the station, facilities may be used before we begin the return walk to Ramsbottom. We follow the River Irwell south to Lumb, then turn our attention east to ascend around 300mts to Bull Hill (418m). Although within a military ‘danger zone’ if flags are not flying, all will be well.
From Bull Hill we continue south-east over White Hill (369m), Harcles Hill (371m) to The Peel Tower (340m), an excellent viewpoint that commemorates Robert Peel, the Victorian prime minister who founded the Police. From the tower we descend on ‘the Peel walk’ towards Brockbottoms, then back on ‘Irwell Valley Way’ to Ramsbottom.
Plan ‘B’
If we arrive in Ramsbottom too late for the steam train we can do a circular walk that involves heading north up the valley to Stubbins then going east to Bull Hill and returning as Plan 'A’. This would also allow option to catch the steam train at 14.55 to Rawtenstall and return on the same train to Ramsbottom, arrives 15.42 (approx £8)
Les
Peel Tower
Then there's my offering...
The walk commences off J5 on the M65, at a bus stop on the B6232 (Haslingdon Rd).
Taking to the lane opposite (Belthorn Rd.) we spy a footpath sign pointing across the fields to pass below the village of Belthorn via Rann farm and Bank Fold farms.
Ascendng slightly we contour round the hillside into a small side valley passing above a waterfall to ascend the other side of the valley to a ruin. We next head south over Pickup Bank Height then onto Jackson Height Rd.
We leave the road before the next bend onto a track, next we follow the fence line over Green Hill heading for Hog Lowe Pike and its Trig point (383m/1256ft)
Still following the fence we cross to Causeway Height (386m/1266ft) to head due south above the edge of the hillside to Scholes Height (415m/1361ft) then we turn south easterly to the highest point of the day Bull Hill (418m/1371ft).
This hill is on part of a firing range, so if the flags are flying we’ll need to detour slightly around the northern flank to rejoin our route.
Returning to our southerly trend we descend then along the ridge towards Harcles Hill. The final hill is now before us, from its top we’ll see the Peel Tower below our next destination.
Below us, Ramsbottom,Hazelhurst and Holcombe.
The final part of the walk depends on where the coach has been parked, or what arrangements have been made for our collection pickup point.
Today’s walk is a fairly easy, with significant stretches where there is no path shown on the map.
I would estimate 75% of the route has no paths shown on the map. However there are many local paths visible on Google earth.
As usual we still have some empty seats, so bring a friend along, and some sunshine would be nice too!
See you on the 30th
Regards
John & Linda
16/9/2018 - ULDALE

A WALK for the 16th September 2018

ULDALE

Leader John Adams

Distance 10 miles / 16 km (Extras add another 1.9 miles/3 km) - (total = 11.9 miles / 19 km)

Ascent (total) 2535ft / 773m (Extras add another 460ft / 140m) - ( total = 2995ft / 913m)

Time 5½ to 6 hours

Sunset Time 19:27

Map OL4 - English Lakes - North Western Area - North Sheet

Start Grid Ref NY224318


Hello everyone,
Sorry for the very late posting off my walk, again!
I've watched the forecasts with increasing dismay over the last two days since my return from London, but perhaps it may not be too bad.
The walk commences at the junction of the A591 and a small lane (Winding Gate) at Chapel Bridge.
Taking to the lane brings us to Bassenthwaite village, we’ll pass alongside the village via the footpath down Back Hill.
Following the path across the fields to pass Peter House farm, we join the ‘alternative Cumbria Way route’.
The track leads us uphill into the combe below Birkett Edge to Whitewater Dash falls.
Just above the falls we exit the track, cross over Dash Beck then climb ‘steeply’ following the fence up to Little Calva (642m/2106ft). (An extra 2km and 60m/197ft would enable us to add Great Calva 690m/2264ft)
Our planned route now takes us downhill to pass above Burn Todd but below the summit of Knott (710m/2329ft). (An extra 80m/262 ft ascent would deliver us to the summit, with approx 1km added)
Next up is the top of Great Scar Fell (651m/2135ft) then Little Scar Fell (630m/2067ft) to be followed by Lowthwaite Fell (509m/1670ft) and lastly Longlands Fell (483m/1585ft)
On leaving Longlands Fell we make for the low hill Mickle Rigg way below then joining a farm track west to the B5299 into Uldale

Today’s walk is a fairly strenuous, with significant stretches where there is no path shown on the map. However there are many local paths that can be traversed comfortably.
The section from Dash beck to Little Calva is steep, necessitating the use of the fence to aid ascent! I’ve ascended here at least twice previously with no problems, although after the rain it may be more difficult.
So see you tomorrow, bring some sunshine with you!
John & Linda
2/9/2018 - HOUSESTEADS

A WALK for the 2nd September 2018

HOUSESTEADS (near Hexham)

Leader John Adams

Distance 9 miles / 14.5 km

Ascent (total) 1460ft / 445m

Time 5.5 hours

Sunset Time 19:58

Map OL43 - Hadrian’s Wall (Housesteads) to Haltwhistle

Start Grid Ref NY794684


Hello everyone,
I'm early with my walk posting for a change. Weather forecast 'as yet' looks reasonable. Its five years since we last visited this area, that was in June and we had lovely sunny weather.
I plan to repeat the walk I did then as it seemed to please everyone on the day. It's not a hard walk by our usual measure, although those numerous ups and downs do add up!
Sadly I believe that Peter is likely having to work yet again!! So we'll be deprived of his excellent skills and company yet again.
Peter, if you get to read this; and you are planning on offering your walk to the members, please let me know so I can arrange the coach to wait for you this time!
So, the walk.
The walk commences at the car park of Housesteads on the B6318.
Leaving the coach we walk up to the remains of the massive Roman garrison of Vercovicivm, better known as Housesteads.
We’ll have time to have a look around the fort before we set off to the West along the wall above Housesteads Crags then Cuddy’s Crags followed by Hotbank Crags.
We soon come upon the sight of Crag Lough, but to appreciate its best views we first descend then ascend on to the Crags high above the Lough. This is a spectacular place to take some photos.
Continuing on takes us over Peel Crags where after a quite sharp descent we’ll arrive at the quintessential spot where some of the most famous photographs depicting Hadrian's wall are taken from!
Next to come is Windshield Crags, then a long slow easy descent to Caw Gap where a lane passes through the wall.
Still moving westwards we ascend Cawfield Crags before milecastle 42 which brings us to Cawfield quarry, a quite delightful spot here we’ll find some toilets and a most pleasant place for an afternoon break. (this was once a site of industrial destruction, they removed a whole hill complete with the roman wall on its top! Can’t imagine that happening today)
Our last part of the wall takes us to the roman fort of Aesica, having given it the once over we’ll take the path down to the B6318.
We'll walk a short distance alongside the B6318 all the while seeking out a footpath sign on the other side of the road.
Taking to the path leads us down into the little valley of Haltwhistle Burn, we’ll follow the burn down its quite tortuous route to the fifth footbridge.
We'll leave the burn and climb into Haltwhistle and find ourselves a local alehouse before setting off home!
Today’s walk is a fairly easy walk along the ‘Hadrian’s Wall’ path, however there are numerous short climbs along the route some of which can be quite steep.
This is a lovely area to spend a day walking, so if you're still undecided; send us a text and get yourselves booked on!
See you Sunday,
Regards,
John & Linda
19/8/2018 - PATTERDALE

A WALK for the 19th August 2018

PATTERDALE

Leader John Adams

Distance 8 miles / 13 km

Ascent (total) 3307ft / 1008m

Time 6.5 hours

Sunset Time 20:36

Maps Explorer OL7 & OL5 - The English Lakes - South Eastern & North Eastern Areas

Start Grid Ref NY401081


Hello everyone,
Well it looks like the nice dry, 'even sunny' walks maybe done with? I've been watching the forecasts, hoping that there would be a last minute change for the better. Foolish man!
Taking in to account the poor forecast, I've decided against my first choice of routes. (Which was up Grizedale valley to Eagle crag then ascending Nethermost via the east face; and to finish, descend via Striding edge from Helvellyn!)
So the alternative route I've chosen gives us a couple of escape routes off if the weather gets really nasty.
The walk commences at the Kirkstone Inn, Kirkstone Pass.
We start the day with an ascent - over 1000 ft of it! On to Red Screes (2546 ft/776m) via the cliff path.
From Red Screes Summit we cross over Scandale Pass on our way past Little Hart Crag (2090 ft/637m).
The route takes us over the top of Dove Crag (2598 ft/ 792 m) on to Hart Crag (2696 ft/ 822 m)
Here we cross the narrow ‘Link Hause’ up to the summit of Fairfield (2864ft/873m) the highest point on today’s walk.
Leaving the summit of Fairfield we take the Cofa Pike path down to cross Deepdale Hause then the last ascent of the day sees us on top of St. Sunday Crag(2759ft/841m).
The path now leads us steadily downhill via Birks and Thornhow End to arrive at the little lane which takes us to the A592.
Here on is an easy stroll alongside the main road into Glenridding.
A fairly strenuous one today. Although its only eight miles, we’ll be ascending over 3000 ft. We’ll pass over five summits along the way.
Sadly we're missing Peter again tomorrow, hopefully for the last time this year? Oddly, although we're in the lakes, the turnout is no where near as good as the last walk (Horton)
See you tomorrow,
Regards,
John & Linda
5/8/2018 - PEN-Y-GHENT

A WALK for the 5th August 2018

PEN-Y-GHENT

Leader John Adams

Distance 11 miles / 17.5 km

Ascent (total) 2270ft / 695m

Time 6 hours

Sunset Time 21:04

Map Explorer OL2 - Yorkshire Dales – Southern & Western areas – West sheet

Start Grid Ref SD807726


Hello everyone,
Looks like we might have yet another dry day, maybe see some sunshine too!
I see Peter is unable to join us this time, having just perused his proposed route. It'll be interesting to see who will take on your mantle Peter.
I've no doubt your presence will be missed.
I've opted for a slightly different route for Sunday, as you'll see below.

The walk commences from Horton village. We set off along the main street south through the village. (having visited the loos in the car park first of course!)
After passing the church we take the lane off to the left alongside a stream (which issues out of Douk Cave, sadly out of bounds). On reaching Brackenbottom we leave the tarmac and start uphill on the track/path which brings us just below Peny Ghent summit. We’ll ascend to the summit for a look around and to take some photos, then retrace our steps back to the stile we passed through earlier.
Ignoring the stile back to Brackenbottom we'll follow the Pennine way to the point where it drops into the valley. Taking the track off to the right, we’ll follow this track (Long Lane) all the way across the fellside down to the road near Helwith bridge. After crossing the bridge we’ll follow the lane past the fishing pond on the right,then continuing on to the track on our right over Swarth Moor. We soon take our leave of this track as we wend our way perilously close to the edge of the quarry workings. (well it will feel like it!)
We ascend steeply to our destination, namely Moughton Nab. The view from here is quite breathtaking (this will be only the 3rd time I’ll have ascended it.) Turning our backs on the view we head roughly north to arrive at a wall which we’ll use as a guide until we reach the path coming from Crummack over to Horton.
Passing to the other side of the wall we follow this path as it leads us steadily downhill then across three fields to Horton railway station. The final leg is down the road back to Horton village, drop off your boots & rucksac at the coach. Now off to the pub!! The New Inn I believe?

The walk today is fairly Strenuous, with two main ascents. One is 1500ft/460m, to the summit of Peny Ghent. The second only 495ft/150m, Moughton Nab, however it’s steep! We also have a 2 mile/ 3.3km section which is off a path. This section is across limestone pavement with some deep clefts (Grikes) in it.
Not as testing as some of my proposed walks of late. Quite a good turnout so far, but we still have some seats available! See you Sunday
Regards,
John & Linda
22/7/2018 - BUTTERMERE

A WALK for the 22nd July 2018

BUTTERMERE

Leader John Adams

Distance 10.6 miles / 17 km

Ascent (total) 3943ft / 3202 m

Time 6-7 hours

Sunset Time 21:30

Map Explorer OL4 - The English Lakes - North-western Area

Start Grid Ref NY174169


Hello everyone,
Yet another good day in store, well we'll see!
The walk I have planned is longer and has more ascent than the Snowdon walk from two weeks ago. Ian asked me if we could take in the summits of Robinson and Hindscarth when we visit Buttermere.
I initially looked at starting from Buttermere over the above named summits then Dale Head and down to Cat Bells and on to Keswick. Then I noticed we could do a more interesting route? Here it is ...
The walk commences from Buttermere village.
We set off along the North-eastern shore of Buttermere to Gatesgarth farm (two miles of easy lakeside walking).
However, we now find ourselves confronted by the very steep (1732 ft/ 528m) ascent of Fleetwith edge to the summit at (2126 ft/ 648m).
Following the path along the edge of the fell we cross the Honister quarries then descend via the old trackway to Honister Hause.
Directly opposite is the next big steep ascent (1275 ft/ 388m), this time up to Dale Head (2470 ft/753m) the highest point today.
Having gained the summit we can see across the narrow Honister Pass back to Fleetwith Pike from earlier.
Also, we’ll see before us the next couple of fells to which we will be heading.
Our next fell is a little way out to the summit then back, is Hindscarth itself (2385 ft/ 727m).
The fell next up is Robinson (2417 ft/737m), before we head down to the strangely named High Snockrigg (1725 ft/526m).
The views off High Snockrigg are quite spectacular considering its lowly elevation.
So on we go, continuing downhill to arrive at the lane which delivers us into Buttermere. After divesting myself of rucksac and boots it only remains to decide on which pub!
The walk today is Strenuous, with at least four main ascents. Two of which are over 1000ft/300m. Time is in short supply on this walk, there are no cut off points either! Except via Honister Pass road perhaps?
Not a great turnout so far as seats booked go. For those of you who are out on Sunday we'll see you then. Remember to use the Cafe at Buttermere, please. They are kindly allowing us to use there parking area, so we could return their kindness with some of our custom!
Regards
John
8/7/2018 - SNOWDON

A WALK for the 8th July 2018

SNOWDON

Leader John Adams

Distance 7.5 miles / 12 km

Ascent (total) 3680ft / 1124 m

Time 6-7 hours

Sunset Time 21:42

Map OL17 - Snowdonia

Start Grid Ref SH647555


Hello everyone,
So far the weather looks set for a real hot day this Sunday, fingers crossed!! I'll be taking extra water with me on the day, just in case its as hot as forecasted.
We don't get many opportunities to tackle Snowdon in good weather, only three times in the last 25 years for me. So taking advantage of it I'm going for the full round! A hard day ahead for those adventurous enough to join me.
Here is my offering.
The Snowdon Horseshoe is perhaps the greatest ridge walk in Snowdonia and for many the highlight is a traverse of Crib Goch's arrête. The route begins at Pen-y-pass at the top the Llanberis Pass. Leave the car-park by the northern exit alongside the cafe and follow the Pyg Track as it climbs steadily to Bwlch y Moch.
You soon get a superb view of Crib Goch probably with people already clambering up its east ridge. At Bwlch y Moch leave the Pyg Track and take the path that forks right.
The first section of path from Bwlch y Moch has been paved but only until you reach steeper ground. The slope becomes rockier and the path twists and turns with the occasional short sections of scrambling. The obvious route may appear too difficult but with care you can select an easier route on all sections of this walk.
The most difficult scrambling is roughly two-thirds of the way to the top. Once this has been overcome the remainder of the climb is relatively easy and you soon find yourself perched on the rocks at the eastern end of the ridge. Your selected route along the ridge depends on your nerve. There is a feeling of exposure especially to your right although this can be avoided by taking a lower line to your left.
The best route in good weather is along the crest and providing you take care you will soon arrive at the highest point. From here the ridge descends to the pinnacles.
The best route is to the left following a lower well worn route marked with cairns. Bwlch Coch is reached with Crib Goch completely conquered. Ahead lies an interesting, but easier, traverse of Crib y Ddysgl. Of similar character to Crib Goch there is one section of scrambling that might cause problems if you don't discover the easy route.
Otherwise it is straightforward with superb views all the way to the summit of Garnedd Ugain. Only 20 metres shorter than Snowdon this mountain deserves better acclaim as many people completely ignore it on their way to Snowdon. Descend from Garnedd Ugain in a south-westerly direction to reach the railway. Follow this, and the crowds, to Snowdon's Summit.
Leaving the crowds in our wake we descend ‘very steeply’ (1100ft/337m) via a very rough path to the low point before following the path up and over the twin summits of Llewidd, passing the Watkin path on route. The route is easy to discern as we eventually work our way back down to the lake shore and join the miners track, this track leads us back to Pen-y-pass.
On this walk today you will need a head for heights and require some scrambling skills. 'This is not a route for the inexperienced’ Grade - very hard
So there you have it, I expect the summit and miners track will be swarming. Crib Goch will undoubtedly be busy too, some queuing maybe required.
See you Sunday
Four Lane Ends 08:00hrs single pickup!
Regards
John
24/6/2018 - BORROWDALE

A WALK for the 24th June 2018

BORROWDALE

Leader Russell Cobb

Distance Between 9 miles and 11 miles (see options below)

Ascent (total) Between 2200 ft and 3650 ft (see options below)

Sunset Time 21:54

Maps OL4 The English Lakes (north western area)

Start Grid Ref NY246136

In the apparent absence of anyone else leading an A-walk, here's what I'm planning. From Seatoller, follow the road to Seathwaite Farm, then shortly after passing the farm take the path to the summit of Glaramara (a steep climb of 2196 feet). Follow the ridge south to Allen Crags, then drop down to Esk Hause. From here there are two options, both of which make the walk about 11 miles long all told.
Option 1) time permitting, press on to Scafell Pike. This will entail a steady 609ft climb to the top of Broad Crag, the drop down to Broad Crag Col and another climb of about 400 feet to the summit of England's highest mountain. Return to Seatoller via the Corridor Route. 11 miles, about 3600 feet of ascent. NB missing out Glaramara and ascending via Grains Gill chops the ascent down to about 3100 feet.
Option 2) from Esk Hause, descend via the gorgeous Sprinkling Tarn to Styhead Tarn, then climb Great Gable (a steep ascent of 1450 feet). Descend to Styhead via Windy Gap then follow the path along Styhead Gill, down to Stockley Bridge then back to Seatoller. 11 miles, 3650 feet of ascent (due to the height thrown away from Esk Hause to Styhead Tarn). NB missing out Great Gable is easy enough for anyone who wants to - this chops nearly 2 miles off the distance and 1450 feet off the ascent.

Either way, it's a strenuous walk, but doable. It's supposed to be a nice day - the views from Great Gable will be fantastic if that's the case.
10/6/2018 - THE ROACHES

A WALK for the 10th June 2018

THE ROACHES

Leader John Adams

Distance 11 miles/17.7 km

Ascent (total) 450 m/1475 ft

Time 5.5-6 Hours

Sunset Time 21:33

Maps OL24 - The Peak District - The White Peak Area - West Sheet

Start Grid Ref SJ930634


Hello everyone,
Looks like yet another good days walking weather to be enjoyed, we'll be getting too used to this!
Like Peter, we'll be treading the same route as we did in 2014.
(Its difficult to find alternative routes to walk in to the Roaches, due to the direction we have to use approaching this area!)
I looked at an alternative walk that took in Rudyard reservoir then across country to Tittesworth reservoir (though because this is supposed to be the 'Roaches' walk so I've saved the route for possible future use).
The walk commences on the A523 near Hug Bridge. (this is a real bridge not a place)
We leave the coach and cross the field above the River Dane to the Gritstone Trail, albeit rather a brief stretch of it.
Our route takes us much further along the Dane valley as it winds and twists its way to reach Danebridge. Crossing to the other bank via the road bridge we continue following the river, until the inflow of Black Brook in Gradbach Wood.
Having enjoyed the leisurely start to the day we now find ourselves with a little bit of ascent before us. As we seek out ‘Luds Church’ a very narrow deep cleft in the hillside rocks, which we’ll explore.
Out of ’Luds Church’ we ascend steadily through Gradbach Wood then on to the brow of the hill.
We’ll cross the narrow lane near Roaches End & Bearstone Rock, this is the start of the path across the ‘Roaches’. (there’s usually an ice cream van located here!)
We arrive at the trig point (505m/1657 ft) on top of the Roaches,Today’s highest point. A little further on we come across a rather odd place to find a pond, namely Doxey Pool on top of the Ridge no less!
Whilst below us on our right you will find the spectacular rock walls which are a favourite with the rock climbing fraternity. On reaching the apparent end of the ‘Roaches’ you’ll notice one last hill before us, this is ‘Hen Cloud’.
This is our last climb of the day (only 60m/200 ft) to the top!
We pass around toward the rear of ’Hen Cloud’ taking the path toward Naychurch, but leave the track/path before reaching it.
Taking the route along the valley bottom past Dains Mill leads us into Upper Hulme, where we will call into the Rock Inn for a quick one! Leaving Upper Hulme we take the Whitty lane track/path to Middle Hulme, then taking one of the entrance paths off the lane to Tittesworth reservoir and its visitor centre.
Here we might be able to enjoy another ice-cream perhaps, and visit the loos before the coach transports us back home.
Today’s walk is not a difficult one. However we do have a 500ft/150m steepish ascent out of the Dane valley. Then some ups and downs along the Roaches ridge, plus Hen Cloud to finish!
I don't need to remind you do I? 08:00 single pickup at Four Lane Ends Thornton. No I didn't think so!
13/5/2018 - ILKLEY

A WALK for the 13th May 2018

ILKLEY via Otley

Leader John Adams

Distance 10 miles / 16km

Ascent (total) 950ft / 290m

Time 5 Hours

Sunset Time 21:00

Maps Explorer 297 Lower Wharfedale & Washburn Valley

Start Grid Ref SE202455


Hello everyone,
I don't know if you've been following the forecasts for this coming Sunday. On BBC1 news they show what looks like heavy rain passing northwards through the day, whilst on BBC northwest they stated that Sunday would be sunny? Oh well, as we all know it'll do whatever it wants!
The walk commences in Otley town centre, leaving the coach we make our way through various side roads to cross the River Wharfe via Otley bridge.
We continue along Billam’s Hill Rd past the Hospital on Newall Carr Rd before turning into Richard Rd. then into David Rd.
On our right we find the path we seek hidden in the corner on the bend, this takes us out into the fields as we head for the Hamlet of Clifton.
Leaving Clifton we pass through Covey Hall farm to the end of Hallam Lane then through Grassgarth farm into Town Head.
From Town Head crossing some fields we pass Scales House farm on our way through more fields, woods and stiles to tramp along the quiet Smithy lane into Denton.
Following Denton Rd. a little way we find a track off the left which takes us along the boundary of West Park Wood (a good place for an afternoon break here!).
Now we carry on through yet more woodlands and streams to find ourselves above the village of Middleton.
Following the road on the right fork we walk along Slates Lane to the footpath down into ‘Coppy/Middleton Woods’ and it’s wonderful display of bluebells.
Lastly we pass by the old swimming pool then down to the riverside. Having crossed the River Wharfe you will find the coach near the Riverside Hotel and associated café.
Today we walk the lovely bluebell walk we’ve done before, the walk is easy with a couple of easy ascents and finishes with a slow descent into Ilkley.
I really enjoy this walk, I know its not a hard walk, but it's a lovely leisurely one!!
So see you Sunday
Regards
John & Linda
29/4/2018 - LANGDALES

A WALK for the 29th April 2018

LANGDALES

Leader John Adams

Distance 8 miles / 12 km

Ascent (total) 3110ft / 950m

Time 6 Hours

Sunset Time 20:42

Maps Explorer OL6 - The English Lakes - South Western Area

Start Grid Ref NY294063


Hello everyone
I'm very much the cows tail this week, all behind!! It seems we may get away with a dry one too, always good when clopping around the Langdales. Having studied the numerous walks we've done over the last 20+ years I've been trying to decide which one to repeat. The walk I've chosen is one we last did in April 2015, it takes in all of the 'Pikes' plus one or two others. And to give you extra value, a 'scramble up' to start and a 'scramble down' to finish. I wonder how many will join me? We have a very good turnout for this trip.
The walk commences at New Dungeon Ghyll car park. We start the day climbing, as we ascend the steep path alongside Stickle Ghyll up to Stickle Tarn. Once you have got your breath back, we’ll walk anti-clockwise round Stickle Tarn until we reach the path which takes us to the foot of ‘Jacks Rake’.
Having negotiated the easy scramble of Jacks Rake up to the summit of Pavey Ark (700m/2297ft) we’ll have a wander across to the next summit of Harrison Stickle (736m/2415 ft) the highest of the Pikes. From Harrison we’ll be able to see our next objective, Loft Crag (670m/2198 ft) way below us. Having stood on Loft Crag we turn our attention to the distinctive outline of ‘Pike O Stickle’ which has a nice little bit of hands on to reach it’s summit (709m/2326ft).
Well that’s all of the Pikes done, so we’ll set off to Thunacar Knott then on to High Raise. todays highest point (762m / 2500ft). Partly retracing our steps from High Raise we make for the distinctive shape of Sergeant Man.
Leaving Sergeant Man we follow the path down towards Blea Rigg. Leaving the path before reaching Blea Rigg we cross over to the top of Whitegill Crag.
There dropping away near the summit is our way down, the narrow confines of Whitegill ravine. About 300m/985ft of it! Having negotiated our down the ravine we then make our way back to the New Dungeon Ghyll, then lastly the coach.
At first glance the shortness of the walk may give you the idea that today’s venture will be an easy one! So be warned there’s ascent and lot’s of it, seven tops in all! Oh, and don’t forget the scramble down the ravine, just to round off a perfect day!
Well there you have it,
I see Peter has set his group a new bench mark to be attained, they'll be overtaking the A's at this rate!!!
See you tomorrow,
John & Linda
15/4/2018 - CASTLETON

A WALK for the 15th April 2018

CASTLETON

Leader John Adams

Distance 11.8 miles / 19 km

Ascent (total) 1686ft / 514m

Time 6 - 6.5 Hours

Sunset Time 20:07

Maps Explorer OL1 - The Peak District - Dark Peak Area

Start Grid Ref SK195864


Hello everyone
I've debated with my self long and hard about which walk to do tomorrow, hence the reason for my very tardy posting! Plus the weather is not looking too promising for the afternoon. Initially the walk started out at 17+ miles!! oops thats a bit far that John. After studying the map a little more I got it down to 14.5 miles (and nearly 3000ft!). Do-able?? maybe. Hmm, still a bit ambitious perhaps? Finally came up with an acceptable (hopefully!) alternative, its based on the walk we last did in June 2011.
Today starts at a bus stop on the side of Ladybower reservoir on the A57.
The start of the walk is directly from the stop. The path climbs slowly above and alongside the main rd until we reach Cutthroat bridge.
We cross the A57 to locate the path opposite, which finally takes us away from the road into Jarvis Clough. The path leads us steadily up the Clough then uphill to Stanage Edge.The highest point is High Neb (458m/1502 ft)
Our high vantage point means we’ll have views right down the Hope valley to Lose Hill and Mam Tor some miles away, plus the Ladybower reservoir below us.
We leave the ‘Edge’ at the Long Causeway?
Descending through woodlands to Green’s House farm then on to Outlane. Leaving Outlane we follow Hurstclough lane through Hurst Clough then across the fields to the A6013.
We search out a little path under the railway line which drops us on to the A6187 this road takes us over the River Derwent where we leave it to pass through the village of Shatton.
Leaving Shatton we make our way along quiet lanes and tracks to another small village named Brough.
The route now parallels the River Noe across the fields towards Hope, however we bypass Hope as we continue across the fields until we reach the outer fringes of Castleton.
The last stage of the walk is through the town to find the coach, hopefully in the main car park near the tourist info centre.
Today’s walk is fairly easy with one main ascent (250m/820 ft) We’ll be on a gritstone edge (Stanage) where you’ll have to watch your step at times. That said the rest of the day is through woods and fields so should present no problems.
So we'll see you tomorrow, fingers crossed it stays dry.
Regards
John & Linda
1/4/2018 - COCKERMOUTH

A WALK for the 1st April 2018

COCKERMOUTH

Leader John Adams

Distance 10.5 miles / 17 km

Ascent (total) 2500 ft / 765 m

Time 5.5 Hours

Sunset Time 19:50

Maps Explorers OL4 English Lakes - North Western Area

Start Grid Ref NY218276


Hello everyone
It seems likely we'll get another dry day!! well according to the nice lady on the Beeb that is.
As you are all probably aware this is another new venue for the club, I've never walked there before anyway.
My walk is not overly difficult, but it does have a couple of awkward sections as you'll read in the description below.
The walk commences at the junction on the A66 and the lane from Powter How. Leaving the coach at the junction, we walk along the lane into Powter How.
Here we turn into the woods to begin our ascent to the summit of Barf (420m/1378ft). The ascent steepens as we ascend to arrive at quite an awkward section past the waterfall. Once past the falls the path becomes easier as it swings round to the summit.
The view from here is extensive gazing across Bassenthwaite Lake the to the bulk of Skiddaw. Our next port of call is Lord’s Seat (552m/1811ft) another vantage point, from where we head north-west to Broom Fell (511m/1676ft).
Following the high ground brings us round to Widow Hause (404m/1325ft) then Graystones (456m/1496ft) high above the lower flanks of Whinlatter Pass. A further short walk brings us to the final summit today, Kirk Fell (438m/1437ft) here we start our descent (330m/1082ft) of it!
The first part of the descent has no paths shown to the open access point below. Having negotiated any obstacles we arrive at a lane where we turn northwards.
Taking the farm track through Shatton (!) Lodge farm puts us on the B5292, ignoring the path opposite we turn northwards again until we take another farm track this time passing above High Stanger farm. Crossing the farm road we arrive at Southwaite bridge on the river Cocker. All that remains is to follow the riverside until we arrive in Cockermouth. Then off to the pub!!
Today’s walk is fairly strenuous! We have one main ascent on the day, 305m/1000ft. With it’s tricky bit at the falls! Plus five summits more, no great ascents/descents here though! The descent from Kirk Fell is over some unmarked ground! A nice easy finish along the riverbank.
So we'll see you Sunday,
John & Linda
4/3/2018 - CONISTON

A WALK for the 4th March 2018

CONISTON via Torver

Leader John Adams

Distance 7.45 miles / 12 km

Ascent (total) 2850 ft / 850 m/p>

Time 5.5 Hours

Sunset Time 17:54

Maps OL7 and OL6 English Lakes - South Eastern and South Western Areas

Start Grid Ref SD302973


Hello everyone
Like most of the country we've been watching the weather! Fortunately it has decided to moderate its excesses for this Sunday.
So with the better conditions I've decided to have a look at Wetherlam summit. This way, the prevailing easterly/north-easterly winds will be at our backs.
It goes without saying if the conditions underfoot are treacherous then we'll abandon the summit for another year!
I have an alternative route we can do once we reach one of our decision points, hopefully still providing us with a good day out.
As you'll see it's not a long walk, although there is quite a bit of ascent, some of it STEEP!! (again if conditions allow it).
The walk commences at Coniston. Leaving the coach in the school grounds we pass through Coniston onto the Coppermines track.
On reaching a lefthand corner on the track we take the path to the right to pass above the YHA, this path gives us two choices of ascending into the Yewdale Fells.
Firstly via the steep path below Yew Pike, or via White Gill, an even steeper ascent, although quicker?
Having gained the top by whichever route chosen we cross Coniston Moor toward Tilberthwaite Gill.
Once above Tilberthwaite falls we’ll follow the old miners track up and around Dry Cove Bottom, climbing ever up towards the shoulder of Birkman Fell.
Above us waits the always interesting Wetherlam Edge which leads us up to the summit of Wetherlam. Todays highest point (762m\2500 ft).
Our route now takes us across to the top of Black Sails (720m\2362 ft) from there we turn South and descend along the narrow ridge over Blake How and Erin Crag until we reach the gap before Kennel Crag.
This is where we descend via the old track bed into the Coppermines valley.
Once safely down, ahead of us lies the old mine workings, from there we follow the path contouring across the fellside to join the path coming down from Hole Rake.
Having joined the descending path we follow it down to join the track leading us back into Coniston.
Today’s walk is strenuous! We have two main ascents over the day.300m/980ft and 425m/1385ft to Wetherlams summit.
The descent from Kennel Crag is over some quite rough ground! The route above assumes that the ground conditions will allow us to proceed without undue risk.
See you tomorrow as usual
John & Linda
18/2/2018 - KIRKBY LONSDALE

A WALK for the 18th February 2018

KIRKBY LONSDALE (via Sedbergh)

Leader John Adams

Distance 12.5 miles / 20.1 km

Ascent (total) 2400 ft / 730 m

Time 7 Hours

Sunset Time 17:25

Maps OL2 - Yorkshire Dales - Western Areas and OL19 - Howgill Fells

Start Grid Ref SD647917


Hello everyone
After two quite passable days locally, the weather forecast for Sunday although not good, at least its not windy and p**ing it down!
We last did this walk in 2015 in April, and it was wet underfoot then at lower levels.
We do have some off piste walking to do, although its not of any difficulty.
The majority of the walk is a long ascent to Calf top, about 8 km / 5 miles of it!
We take our leave of the coach at the junction of the A684 & the A683 on the outskirts of Sedbergh.
We take the path immediately at the junction crossing two fields to ‘Birks’ on the River Rawthey. The footbridge ahead takes us over the Rawthey then along it’s bank a short distance to Abbotts Holme bridge over the River Dee.
After a very short distance on tarmac, we leave the comfort of any footpath for a while; as we start to climb steadily looking for the wall which will act as our guide all the way to Calf Top (609m/1998 ft).
Hopefully weather permitting, we should have some great views down into the narrow valley of Barbondale far below us; not forgetting the wide Lune valley and beyond. From the highest point of the day we now have a long descent ahead of us, and some of it is steep!
Our descent will bring us to the pretty village of Barbon, the final stages of the walk will pass over fields through Underfell, Whelprig, Fell Garth, Hole House and Langthwaite then on to Fellfoot Road (track). No doubt it’ll be nice and muddy in places after all the recent rain.
At the end of the track we turn downhill past Blindloss farm then cross over the old Roman road into High Casterton.
We then walk along Laitha lane passing through the caravan park which brings us directly to where the coach is parked near Devil’s Bridge.
Today’s walk is strenuous, we have to ascend (240m/790ft) with no footpath to guide us for a distance of 3km/1.8 miles. The descent at the far end of the ridge is STEEP and slippery, so caution is needed. The latter stages of the walk into Kirkby Lonsdale are easy, although probably muddy.
See you Sunday
John & Linda
4/2/2018 - GRASMERE

A WALK for the 4th February 2018

GRASMERE

Leader John Adams

Distance 9.2 miles / 14.8 km

Ascent (total) 3130 ft / 954 m

Time 6½ Hours

Sunset Time 16:58

Maps Explorer OL7 and OL5 - The English Lakes - South Eastern and North Eastern Areas
Outdoor Leisure 2 Yorkshire Dales Southern and Western Areas

Start Grid Ref NY376046


Hello everyone
Well after last time out when the weather was 'nasty' this Sunday is promising to be dry, albeit cold. So with this in mind I've decided to go high, i.e. the Fairfield round! I'll have my spikes with me as I expect there will be some snow and ice from earlier in the week.
The walk commences in Ambleside at the rugby club. We set out at the North end of Ambleside taking the road behind the Museum to Nook End farm.
Crossing Low Sweden bridge we start the climb that finishes on the summits of Dove Crag, Hart Crag and Fairfield.
The path up along the ridge passes over Low Pike (1667 ft / 508 m) then High Pike (2152 ft / 656 m) to level off a little over Dove Crag summit (2598 ft / 792 m).
Next on the agenda is Hart Crag (2697 ft / 822 m) and then finally the highest point of the day, Fairfield (2864 ft / 873 m).
(There is the alternative descent, down to Grisedale Hause then past Great Tongue to the A591 finishing in Grasmere. A longer route back)
Turning South we now start our descent to Grasmere, first down the ridge to Great Rigg (2513 ft / 766 m) here we branch right downhill toward Stone Arthur.
The path down from Stone Arthur is Steep, and it takes us down into the steep gully bottom. With wobbly legs we'll find ourselves on the main A591,
Those with a thirst cross can over into Grasmere along the road, whilst the rest of us walk across the fields to the coach and a long sit down.
Today’s walk is a tough one with just over 3000 ft of ascent and a steep finish off Stone Arthur.
See you Sunday then
John
21/1/2018 - SETTLE

A WALK for the 21st January 2018

SETTLE

Leader John Adams

Distance 10.75miles / 17.3km

Ascent (total) 1565ft / 477m

Time 5½ - 6 Hours

Sunset Time 16:28

Maps Outdoor Leisure 41 Forest of Bowland,
Outdoor Leisure 2 Yorkshire Dales Southern & Western Areas

Start Grid Ref SD724699


Hello everyone
It seems like we're due for a bit of a bashing by the weather this Sunday!! snow, wind, rain lovely!
So with that in mind I've planned my walk with an west to east route, that way the worst of the weather is at our backs (hopefully).
I last did this walk back in October 2003.
Sunday I'll be taking my gaiters and probably my spikes, maybe goggles?
As you know, limestone can be real slippery when its wet, so watch how you go.
So this what I plan to do.
The walk commences near the little village of Newby on the A65. From the village we take the green lane across the fields into the village of Clapham (toilets here if needed).
Leaving the village we cross more fields to arrive at Austwick. We now walk down Wood Lane for about quarter a mile at which point we leave the track and take the path going up and round the hill passing Feizor.
The path now takes us straight up the hill alongside Feizor Wood. At the large gate we leave the track and follow the wall to our left.
After crossing two fields we follow the wall over the brow to the edge of Pot Scar. We follow the Scar edge to Smearsett Scar trig point which you will see ahead of us.
After leaving the Scar we descend into the valley below, we then take leave of the path to follow the wall south until we reach the path towards Giggleswick Scar.
Here the path passes along & under Giggleswick Scar then up and past the school boys tower cairn above the quarry.
Finally we descend the hill onto the Ribble way along the river then into Settle.
This is an interesting walk passing through some lovely dales villages and fascinating limestone scenery.
See you Sunday
John
7/1/2018 - KENDAL

A WALK for the 7th January 2018

KENDAL

Leader John Adams

Distance 11 miles /18 km

Ascent (total) 1315ft / 400 m

Time 6 Hours

Sunset Time 16:05

Map OL7 - The English Lakes - South Eastern Area

Start Grid Ref SD527828


Hello everyone.
Linda and I hope you all had a good Christmas. We wish you all a very happy and prosperous New Year too!
The walk I'm planning to do is one I last lead back in February 2003. It's not very demanding, but a good one to help get us back into the swing of things. Oddly, it looks like the weather will be fairly good, but with a cold northeasterly wind
. At the end of the day of course we have the Christmas meal to look forward to.
Although I'll have the new membership cards with me, I expect some of you will defer until the Settle walk on the 21st!
So here is the walk planned,(I wonder if any of you did it on the previous occasion?)
The walk commences on the A590.
Leaving the coach at the lay-by we start the day by having to clamber over one/two fences (sorry about that, but it’s the only way we can access the start of this walk). With torn trousers/ripped coats this start gets us onto a quiet lane, where turning to the right we find a path which takes us under the A590 into the small village of Milton.
Passing Milton’s mill we come to another lane which takes us to the Lancaster canal. Crossing the canal over Crooklands bridge and then through Crooklands itself we follow Peasey Beck (which supplies water to the canal) to reach Challon Hall.
The path now takes us across various fields to a tiny village called Mount Pleasant. Now we bear right along the lane to a path on our left just before the M6.
This path soon becomes an enclosed green lane right alongside the motorway. At the end of the green lane we turn away from the M6 to pass through another small village called Old Hutton (scene of a dispute over building a power station there, since defeated recently. Well, until the appeal by the power company of course!)
Just beyond the church we turn North towards Middleshaw.
Leaving Middleshaw we head across country to arrive at New Hutton, now we turn West and make our way to Windy Hill farm via Hagg and Monument Hill.
We now cross over the Kendal/Sedbergh road (A684) to a quiet lane above Singleton Park, lastly we descend steeply into Kendal itself.
Passing by the Castle we cross the River Kent to find the coach, after throwing off your rucksacks I expect you will want to seek out a suitable oasis to satisfy your thirst.
Today's walk is an easy one with three long slow ascents over the day. We finish with a 150m/490ft steepish descent into Kendal. I would expect copious amounts of mud on the day.
See you Sunday
Regards,
Linda & John

2017

10/12/2017 - AMBLESIDE

A WALK for the 10th December 2017

AMBLESIDE

Leader John Adams

Distance 8.6 miles / 13 km

Ascent (total) 2070 ft / 631 m

Time 5.25 Hours

Sunset Time 15:58

Map OL7 - The English Lakes - South Eastern Area

Start Grid Ref SD420987


Hello everyone.
I'm very late this week, trying to decide on a suitable walk distance/ascent to get the best out of the possible weather conditions we may face.
The walk starts out fairly easily, over Orrest head (not the same start point as Peter!), the latter part over Wansfell. The route can be varied at a number of places if the weather turns bad.
We should have sufficient time to mooch around Ambleside when we've finished, I expect we'll depart for home about 16:15 to 16:30.
Fingers crossed for no delays homeward bound!
The walk starts on the A591, at the lane junction to The Common. Taking to the lane brings us to the footpath into Common wood and then Orrest Head. Departing the ‘Head’ we head down toward Elleray Bank then across the fields to the lane passing Causeway farm.
Leaving the lane at Near Orrest farm we cross fields to Moothowe lane, going right to Dubbs road which delivers us to the Garburn road track.
We quickly leave the track to pass through Limefitt park on to the A592 then down to Troutbeck Church.
Of the numerous paths here we take the one along the stream up to Troutbeck village. We exit the village up the steep track of ‘Nanny lane’ which deposits us below Wansfell summit our next destination.,br> We leave the summit heading towards the south west (not down the steep path) with luck we should find ourselves at the top of Blue Hill road.
Where you go next is dependant on what you want to do in Ambleside.
I will point you in the relevant direction whilst I will head for the coach via Fisherbeck car park then across the field to the recycling centre. Hopefully the coach will be waiting there?

Today’s walk is only a short one but with 2000ft/630m ascent. I expect you will have sufficient time in Ambleside at the finish.
See you tomorrow
John;
12/11/2017 - TEBAY

A Group Walk for the 12th November 2017

TEBAY via Kendal & A6

Leader John Adams

Distance 10.7 miles / 17.2 km

Ascent (total) 2050 ft / 625 m

Time 5.5 Hours

Sunset Time 16:15

Maps OL7 - The English Lakes - South Eastern Area and OL19 - Howgill Fells & Upper Eden Valley

Start Grid Ref NY553033


Hello everyone.
Although there's no firm forecast for this Sunday as yet, I thought I'd send my planned walk out anyway.
We'll be going to Tebay via Kendal, that way we access the A6 north toward Shap.
Both Peter and myself are planning our walks from roughly the same starting point, i.e. 'Hucks Bridge'.
We last did this walk in March 2012, so its due for a revisit.
The walk starts today in the middle of nowhere. We’ll disembark on the A6 on the bend just before ‘Huck’s Bridge’. We start the day climbing, as we ascend to the first of the seven tops today.
Initial ascent of 155m/500ft from the A6 to the first summit, (Ashstead fell)
Ashstead Fell
Mabbin Crag
Castle Fell\Old High
Whinfell Beacon
Repeater Station
Grayrigg Forest
Grayrigg Pike
(469m/1539ft)
(482m/1581ft)
(478m/1568ft)
(472m/1549ft)
(439m/1440ft)
(494m/1621ft) the days highest point.
(478m/1568ft)
Whilst on Grayrigg Pike we’ll have a grandstand view, high above the M6 gazing across to the Howgills on the other side of the valley.
We retrace our steps a short distance around Grayrigg Forest before commencing our descent into the Borrowdale valley some 350m/1200 ft below. To start we follow the wall partway down; then cross over a large field to the woodland in the far left corner.
Here we join the track which comes down from the repeater station, this takes us into the bottom of the valley alongside Borrow Beck. Following the track out of the valley we find ourselves on tarmac across the A685 then under the M6 and railway line to Salterwath bridge.
The bridge takes us over the river Lune where we turn upstream heading north, the path brings us briefly on to the A685 once more. The final stretch is across a few fields into Tebay and of course the Cross Keys for a welcome end to our day. Lastly we’ll walk up to the A685 roundabout, here we will meet the coach on its homeward journey.
The walk today is strenuous, although having attained the summit of Ashstead Fell ‘most’ of the rest of the tops are fairly undemanding. The exception being the descent!
So there we have it, if the weather turns really foul we can always traverse the valley floor instead! See you Sunda (bring good weather with you!)
Regards,
John & Linda
29/10/2017 - BROUGHTON in FURNESS

A Group Walk for the 29th October 2017

BROUGHTON in FURNESS via Torver

Leader John Adams

Including Caw

Distance 10.6 miles / 17 km

Ascent (total) 2965 ft / 904 m

Time 7 Hours

  

Without Caw

Distance 10 miles / 16.3 km

Ascent (total) 2100 ft / 640 m

Time 5.5 Hours

Sunset time 16:43

Map The English Lakes - Explorer OL6 - South Western Area

Start Grid Ref SD252916


Hello everyone.
It might be that we'll get one of those rare days (for Wyre Ramblers) when the weather will be kind to us. Like Peter I'm doing the same route as last time we were there.
The walk commences on the A593 at Hole Beck, some 4.25km/2.6miles south of Torver.
We start the day with a 250m/820ft ascent from the main road up Cat Bank to Hummer Lane. We leave the lane almost immediately as we take to the forestry track down into the pinewoods, after meandering along various paths we find ourselves on the tarmac through Stephenson Ground.
When we reach Broadslack Beck we take the decision - do we ascend to the summit of Caw (529m/1736ft) an ascent of 269m/880ft then descend to Long Mire valley highest point. Or continue up the Long Mire valley to the highest point.
Either way from the Long Mire valley we ascend to the summit of Fox Haw (385m/163ft).
After Fox Haw we’ll pass Stainton ground disused quarries on our way to the lane below Stickle Pike (375m/1230ft), our next point of call.
On our ascent, we'll pass the attractive Stickle Tarn perched on the hillside below the summit.
Whilst on the Pike summit we’ll be able to see our final fell of the day, ‘Great Stickle’ (305m/1001ft) south from where we’re stood. Making use of the higher ground we work our way round to Great Stickle from there we’ll commence our last descent
. We pick our way down past Little Stickle to the path across to Pickthall Ground farm, then along the lane past Wood House . We leave the tarmac at Hartley Ground farm as the path passes through Hawthwaite How & Hagg to the A593.
The final leg passes through West Park into the village of Broughton in Furness, the coach should be waiting for us on Station Rd.
The walk today is fairly strenuous. We’ll have ‘numerous’ ups & downs as we traverse the Broughton Fells.
Fingers crossed for a dry day. We still have some seats waiting to be filled.
See youSunday.
Regards,
John
15/10/2017 - POOLEY BRIDGE

A Group Walk for the 15th October 2017

POOLEY BRIDGE

Leader John Adams

Distance 14 miles / 22.5 km

Ascent (total) 2772 ft / 845 m

Time 6.5-7 Hours

Sunset time 18.15

Map The English Lakes - Explorer OL5 - South Eastern Area & OL7 North Eastern Area

Start Grid Ref NY401080


Hello everyone.
According to the nice people at the BBC, we're supposed to have a good? reasonable? maybe!! day on Sunday. Just dry will do fine. So with fingers etc crossed, I'll go for the same walk we did last year.
The walk commences at Kirkstone Pass (Kirkstone Inn). We take the path up over St Johns Bells Banner then on to Stony Cove Pike (763m/2503ft).
Then descending steeply into Thresthwaite Mouth before climbing steeply out to Thornthwaite Crag & its Beacon (784m/2572ft).
Next we traverse the length of High Street (828m/2716ft today's high point) heading over Rampsgill Head (792m/2598ft) at its far end.
Shortly after, we cross over High Raise (802m/2631ft) then begins the long slow descent into Pooley Bridge (a further 13.75km/8.5miles)
We pass over a succession of tops as we make our way on the long downhill.
1st - Red Crag - (711m/2333ft)
2nd - Wether Hill - (670m/2198ft)
3rd - Loadpot Hill - (671m/2201ft)
4th - Bonscale Pike - (520m/1706ft)
5th - Arthurs Pike - (530m/1739ft)
From Arthurs Pike we follow a good path down until we meet a wall, then take the better track east.
We forsake the track rather quickly as we have to cross a rather ‘damp’ section of fellside to join the next path round to Roehead.
At Roehead we step onto tarmac, this quiet lane leads us directly into Pooley Bridge.
The walk today is a strenuous one, in parts that is. It has two ascents of note, both about 220m/700ft each. The descent is a long one too. A total of 10 summits in all.
Fingers crossed for a dry day. We still have some seats waiting to be filled.
See you on Sunday.
Regards,
John & Linda
1/10/2017 - MATLOCK BATH

A Group Walk for the 1st October 2017

MATLOCK BATH

Leader John Adams

Distance 11 miles/ 17.7 km

Ascent (total) 2060 ft/627 m

Time 5-6 Hours

Sunset time 18.48

Map EOL24 The Peak District – White Peak Area

Start Grid Ref SK224674


Hello everyone.
I've not seen the forecast for Sunday, but it won't make any difference to the planned walk, unless we have a strong SE wind!
Its not a hard walk you'll be glad to hear, although it does bring with it some 2000ft/620m of ascent over the day.
The walk commences on the A6 just opposite the parking area for Haddon Hall. We cross-over the A6 then ascend gently, we take the footpath off to the left toward Haddon Plantation and continue beyond it past the quarry to the B5056.
Crossing over the River Lathkill we leave the road on the path to Stanton in Peak village, after walking through the village we find our next path off Lees Rd. When we enter the woodland we look for a path off to the right which will lead us past the ‘King Stone’ to the trig point (323m/1060ft).
Heading in a south easterly direction we arrive back on Lees Rd! Crossing it we pass Barn farm onto Clough Lane then east to enter Clough Wood. We cross the valley bottom into Cambridge Wood to emerge above the village of Wensley.
Skirting around the village we pass Dalefields Barn on the hillside then on across numerous fields to Salters Lane. Our route now takes us above and round the village of Bonsall to Masson Hill, from here we pass old quarries to arrive at the ‘Heights of Abraham’ where the cable cars stop at the summit. (weather permitting, good views to be had here!)
Now into the final stage of the walk, we descend past Ember farm into Upperwood then straight down to the A6. Here we cross over the River Derwent (or not if you want to go direct to the shops/pubs!) to walk alongside the river until we reach the parking area and coach
. Now the rest of us will seek out a pub, having got rid of boots and rucsack!!
The walk today is again an easier one only 11 miles! No major ascents, although we do ascend 3 or 4 hills. As you’ll notice it is 2000ft+ in total
Fingers crossed for a dry day. We still have some seats waiting to be filled.
See you on Sunday.
Regards,
John & Linda
17/9/2017 - PATELY BRIDGE

A Group Walk for the 17th September 2017

PATELY BRIDGE

Leader John Adams

Distance 11.5 miles / 18.4 km

Ascent (total) 1100ft / 335m

Time 5-6 Hours

Sunset time 19:23

Map Explorer 298 Nidderdale

Start Grid Ref SE196581


Hello everyone.
Its 5 years since we last visited Pateley Bridge, July 2012 to be precise.
The walk we did then encountered a problem at the stepping stones across the river Nidd, so we'll start the walk from a slightly different point to avoid being stuck again.
Apart from this small change to the 2012 walk the remainder is the same.
It looks like a high pressure area might be in charge of the the weekend weather, so dare we hope for a drop of sunshine? fingers crossed.

The walk commences on the B6451 just after the crossroads past Menwith Hill camp.
We cross three or four fields to pass Fairfield House then onwards to a lane. Taking to the lane for a short distance, we leave it to pass two small reservoirs down to Low Green & Darley village.
We continue downhill until we reach a footbridge across the river Nidd, after passing through White Oak farm on the other side of the river, the bridleway takes us up to the B6165.
Taking the bridleway opposite we ascend slowly passing Prospect farm towards Spring House farm then on to the Brimham Rocks Rd. We follow the lane up to the corner and take to the green lane which is part of the Nidderdale Way.
Staying on the Way leads us toward Brimham rocks, however the Way branches off in a different direction than where we are going so we soon take our leave of it. (we’ll meet it again briefly a little later). Meanwhile we make for the eerie rock formations known as Brimham Rocks
. For those who’ve never seen them I’m sure will be amazed, it demonstrates what the power of wind and rain can do to solid rock given sufficient time. Having clambered over the fantastic formations and taken pictures of them, sadly we’ll have to take our leave.
We descend via High North Pasture farm into the woodlands, following the little valley of Fell Beck (we rejoin the Way again here to Smelthouses) down past Smelthouses over the B6165 to the bank of the River Nidd. The final leg of our day is nice and easy along the River Nidd past Glasshouses into Pateley Bridge.

The walk today is for ‘us’ a nice easy one only 11 miles! No major ascents and a long level finish!
See you on Sunday.
Regards,
John & Linda
3/9/2017 - GRASMERE

A Group Walk for the 3rd September 2017

GRASMERE

Leader John Adams

Distance 9 miles / 14.5 km

Ascent (total) 2300 ft / 701 m

Time 5 Hours

Sunset time 19:57

Maps OL6 & OL7 The English Lakes, South Eastern Area & South Western Area.

Start Grid Ref NY337073


Hello everyone.
Well it looks like we're going to have a wet one!! So I've decided to stay a bit lower than I was planning to do.
Still I suppose after the last two quite hard walks this will prove to be quite easy?
The walk commences from the Grasmere car park.
Leaving the coach we walk up the Easedale road into the Easdale Valley making for the Sourmilk Gill waterfalls.
After passing the waterfalls but before reaching Easdale Tarn we leave the path to start climbing via a narrow path up to Tarn Crag via Greathead Crag.
From Tarn Crag (550 m / 1805 ft) we make our way via Fernhill Crag to pick up the footpath above Broadstone Head.
From Broadstone Head we we take the path up through the crags as we make for the highest point today ‘Sergeant Man’ (730m/2395 ft).
Leaving the lofty place behind we’ll take the path which deposits us onto Blea Rigg,.
Continuing on we cross over Great Castle Howe then Little Castle Howe, Swinecar Pike and Lang How until we reach two small unnamed tarns.
Here we decide, do we go on to Silver How? Or do we descend Brigstone Moss?
Either way we find ourselves on the same path albeit at different points along its meanderings into Grasmere via Allen Bank.

The walk is not a difficult one today. Due to the poor forecast, the walk is lower and shorter. The first half of the walk is all ascent, the latter half is all descent.
So there you have it.
See you Sunday.
Regards,
John & Linda

A Group Walk for the 20th August 2017

MOFFAT

Leader John Adams

Distance 12.8 miles / 20.6 km

Ascent (total) 3492 ft / 1064 m

Time 7 Hours

Sunset time 20:29

Map Explorer 330 - Moffat & St Marys Loch

Start Grid Ref NT186145


Hello everyone.
This is a first for our club, off to Ennerdale. The walk I have planned starts off from the Grey Mares tail Waterfalls north-east of Moffat. I hope this doesn't interfere with Peters plans?
Its too early to get any firm idea of the weather we can expect up around Moffat on the day. (Probably wet!)
The walk commences from the Grey Mares Tail waterfalls on the A708.
On leaving the coach we head up the path to the falls, after gazing our fill we’ll need to find a suitable point to cross over Tail Burn.
Once we have acquired the opposite bank we direct our gaze to the heights above, namely ‘White Coomb’ (821m/2693ft) via Upper Tarnberry. Its a Corbett I believe. We’ll use the wall as a guide to the summit some 360m/1200ft above!!!
Next on the list is the slightly lower summit of Firthhope Rig (800m/2625ft) off to the north-west.
Our next summit Stirk Craig (709m/2326ft) lies across the otherside of Rotten Bottom! A low lying area some 200m/650ft below us. Having crossed Rotten Bottom we ascend 100m/328ft to Stirk Craig summit.
We now have our last big down then up across to Hartfell Rig (739m/2424ft) That’s 100m/328ft down -131m/430ft up!
From Hartfell Rig we walk around the end of the huge glacial valley called Black Hope, its floor lying some 500m/1640ft below as we head for the last summit today, Hart Fell (808m/2651ft) another Corbett. We’ll continue along the rim of the valley passing a strangely named ‘Hass O the Red Roads’ then on to Falcon Craig (724m2375ft)
We take leave of the edge of the valley via Upper Coomb Craig & Swatte Fell. Our route is all downhill from here as we walk down the broad ridge of Nuberry Moss to Blue Cairn (yes, there is a cairn). Heading to the south west we continue to descend, firstly to Greygill Head then on down to have a look at the quite revolting Moffat Well.
We now follow the tarmac down to Archbank bridge over Hind Gill, leaving the lane we cross the fields up to the woods on Gallow Hill. Entering the woods at the northern end we follow its western edge which will bring us into Moffat.
Today's walk is strenuous. There are no marked paths although there may be faint paths on the ground. The final 9 km / 5.6 miles is nearly all downhill.
So another tough walk to look forward to.
See you Sunday.
Regards,
John & Linda
6/8/2017 - ENNERDALE BRIDGE

A Group Walk for the 6th August 2017

ENNERDALE BRIDGE

Leader John Adams

Distance 10 miles / 16 km

Ascent (total) 738 m / 2421 ft

Main Ascent 290 m / 955 ft

Time 6 Hours

Sunset time 20:59

Map OL4 The English Lakes North Western Area

Start Grid Ref NY070158


Hello everyone.
This is a first for our club, off to Ennerdale. Should make for an interesting day!
I've put a walk together which offers the opportunity to anyone collecting Wainwrights to tick off three more. Whoap being a Birkett.
Sadly we have about 2.5 miles of tarmac before we tread on fellside, plus another 1.25 mile to finish. Ennerdale Bridge is not that close to the hills.
Of course you'll remember it's a single coach pickup at ThorntonFfour Lane ends 08:00 Sunday. Won't you?
The walk is a hard one because the fells rise steeply up and steeply down with few paths shown on the map. However, weather permitting the vistas are extensive giving you a different view of the north western fells and across to Scotland.
So here's my offering.
I do have an alternative if the weather proves unhelpful.
The walk commences in Ennerdale Bridge village. We take the road toward Cleator Moor (B5295) out of the village, leaving it after about 500m/yds we turn south on to Scarney Brow Lane. Sadly we have to tramp along this lane for almost another 3km/1.9 miles before we put our feet on a fellside.
Taking the track left we commence our first ascent, after crossing the infant river Calder. Facing us is an ascent (no path shown here) of 290m/955ft to the summit of Lank Rigg (541m/1775ft) the highest point today. As usual, after admiring the view (what view I hear!) we descend (110m/360ft) then yet again up we go, only 80m/260ft this time to the summit of Whoap (511m/1676ft).
Heading north easterly until we arrive at a wall, we follow the wall downhill toward the plantation below us. We take to the track in the forest heading east, shortly, we leave the trees to spy the next summit, a mere 30m/100ft ascent. This is Grike (488m/1601ft) with its extensive vistas.
To finish our summit count today we almost retrace our steps back to the trees, however we’ll be making for the summit of Crag Fell off to the left. Crag Fell (523m/1716ft) has stupendous views down the Ennerdale valley and fells beyond. Well worth spending a while here enjoying the scenery, after all the hard work to get there.
So, its down we go, STEEPLY! across Revelin Crag into Ben Gill. The path angles across the steep fellside toward the trees far below.
Still it descends through the wood until finally after 400m/1300ft we have a nice easy flat 2km / 1.25mile walk back to Ennerdale Bridge, the pub and coach.
Today’s walk has a long walk in, the first ascent 290m/955ft is steep. We’ll be off any real paths for approx 5km/3miles until near Grike.
The descent is STEEP. however we have an easy finish over the final 2km / 1.25miles
Today’s walk is hard /strenuous
So there you have it, I wonder how many of you will sign up for it?
See you Sunday.
Regards,
John & Linda
23/7/2017 - DUFTON

A Group Walk for the 23rd July 2017

DUFTON via Appleby

Leader John Adams

Distance 11.2 miles / 17.9 km

Ascent (total) 1978 ft / 603m

Main Ascent 1710 ft / 520m

Time 6 Hours

Sunset time 21:23

Map OL19 - The Howgill Fells & Upper Eden Valley

Start Grid Ref NY689250


Hello everyone.
Here's what I have planned for next Sunday, fingers crossed for a dry one.
(early signs are the weather deteriorating by the end of the week) But plenty of time for that to change?
Needless to say I'll have an alternative walk planned just in case!
I'm reliably informed that the journey is quicker through Orton and Appleby than up to Penrith then A66. It's the same walk we did in 2014, those of you with good memories will remember it no doubt.
The walk commences in Dufton. After visiting the loos, we walk round the corner to find the track which is the start of our day.
We start up the track passing Pusgill House on our long 1700ft/520m ascent to the top of the hills above us. Having passed Dufton Pike and the old mines on our way up, we finally arrive at the edge of Great Rundale Tarn perched high on the fells.
Looking slightly off to the right we’ll spot the trig point (692m/2270ft) above Blackstone Edge. Because the ground may be boggy we’ll keep along the top of the ‘Edge’ until we reach the mouth of High Cup Nick.
If the weather is kind!! We can dawdle as we drink in the vista of this dramatic ice age feature. We pass around the upper end of the ‘Nick’ and above the rock wall marking the south east flank of the valley.
The route takes us rapidly downhill around Middle Tongue to Harbour Flatt farm, and from there to the lane.
After about a mile we leave the lane on a path down to the bottom of the hill, where we turn along the bottom of the valley on the final leg back into Dufton. We go into Dufton via the very interesting old sandstone quarries, which are a quite delightful wooded area to explore, most people who visit Dufton miss this gem.
Then off to the Stag!
Today’s walk has a long ascent, 1700 ft/520m of it, over a distance of (6km/3.75miles). We’ll be off any real paths for approx 5km / 3 miles above Blackstone Edge.
The descent is steep on most of its length, however we have an easy finish over the final 5km / 3 miles. Today’s walk is moderate/hard.
See you Sunday. Usual pick ups again this time.
Regards,
John & Linda
9/7/2017 - FRODSHAM

A Group Walk for the 9th July 2017

FRODSHAM

Leader John Adams

Distance 11 miles / 17.8 km

Ascent (total) 1185ft / 550m

Time 6 Hours

Sunset time 21:39

Map OS Explorer Map 267 Northwich & Delamere Forest

Start Grid Ref SJ516778


Hello everyone.
I'm sending my walk out early, if the weather plays silly bu****s then we'll review it on the day. I don't know what Peter has planned for you, but I'm sure it will be a good days outing as always. A rare circular walk this Sunday.
The walk commences on the High St. in Frodsham, exact point determined by parking place. Once on foot, we’ll seek out Fountain Lane further along the High St. We’ll ascend the lane for about 500m to a narrow path through to Howey Lane.
We leave it almost immediately on to a wide track which becomes the North Cheshire Way, we follow the NCW for the next 5km/3 miles. The NCW contours along the foot of the wooded hillside, then leads us off to the corner of the Village of Helsby. The path from the Old Chester Rd. in Helsby leads steadily upwards to arrive at the high point of Helsby Hill. The views from here are very extensive, Liverpool, Clwyddian Hills and across Cheshire.
Leaving the summit we start to cross a large section of countryside via numerous fields and obscure footpaths. We pass through farms Alderhall, Bowling Alley farm and Manley Old Hall after which we’ll trudge along the Sandstone Trail.
The Trail is fairly well marked as it winds its way along field boundaries to arrive at Ridgeway Lane. Leaving the tarmac we start to ascend into the woodlands, arriving at the top of the hillside we walked below earlier today.
The path is obvious apart from one place, as it follows the edge of the hill to bring us to the War Memorial Monument high above Frodsham. All that remains is to make our way downhill into Frodsham via various paths and roads
. Then into the Bears Paw pub before the coach home.
Today’s walk is an easy one. The largest ascent is only 120m/390ft. A large part of the route is across farm fields via faint paths. There are also four other ascents of a lesser nature.
Fingers crossed for a dry one, dare we hope for sunshine?? perhaps a wish too far. We are back to the normal pickups this Sunday.
See you Sunday.
Regards,
John & Linda
25/6/2017 - CONWY (Conway)

A Group Walk for the 25th June 2017

CONWY (Conway)

Leader John Adams

Distance 9.7 miles / 15.5 km

Ascent (total) 2790ft / 850m

Time 6 Hours

Sunset time 21:45

Map OL17 Snowdonia - Eastern Sheet

Start Grid Ref SH774716


Hello everyone.
Having just read Peters e mail I see he'll not be trudging around Conway this Sunday.
That's a great pity Peter, I'm sure you'll be greatly missed. But good to know you've had the pleasure of surveying your walk, so not missing out altogether. I'm going to change the approach to Conway slightly, as I am detouring the coach down the A470 to Tal-y-Cafn.
After crossing the river Conwy, the coach will drop my group (whoever they maybe) at the crossroads in Ty' n-y Groes.
The coach will then continue back up to the coach park at Conway (the same one Peter mentions) via the B5106 (Llanrwst Rd.) I estimate it shouldn't add more than 20 minutes to our journey time. Distance is around 9 miles. So explanations done with here's my offering.
The walk commences at at tiny place called Ty’ n-y Groes. I’ve no idea how you’d say that!
We take the lane going westwards up the hill, until we find on our left lurking in the hedgerow the path we seek. We cross various fields and pass two farms to cross over the Afon (River) Roe via a road bridge.
Returning to the fields we arrive at a narrow lane near Rose Gerlan Cottages. Turning westwards, after a short distance we’ll leave the lane to start our ascent in earnest.
The paths we’ll follow meander upwards through numerous fields, until we finish the ascent at the summit of Tal y Fan (610m/2001ft) the highest point today.
Walking along the ridge of the fell, we descend past an old quarry continuing the slowly descending ridgeline over Cefn Maen Amor. The faint paths we’re on bring us to Llyn y Wrach a small tarn which we pass behind, then following various tracks and paths we wind up at Sychnant Pass.
After crossing the road our route passes below ‘Alltwen’ a hill on our left as we head for our final hill today, Conway Mountain (244m/800ft).
Leaving the summit we head towards Conway, departing the obvious path before its far end, descending toward Mount Pleasant. Sadly, we have no recourse but to take to the tarmac, walking along the road until we arrive at the end of the southern curtain wall of the castle.
Below us is the main car park where hopefully our coach awaits. Of course time permitting you could have a quick dash into the town for a look around!
Today’s walk is a fairly tough one. One main ascent some 500m/1640ft! Some of the route is across rough ground via faint paths. There are however, other ascents of a lesser nature.
Not a great turnout again sadly, must be something we're doing wrong? Not too worry though I'm sure we'll still have a good day out.
See you Sunday then
Regards,
John & Linda
11/6/2017 - BUTTERMERE

A Group Walk for the 11th June 2017

BUTTERMERE

Leader John Adams

Distance 10 miles / 16 km

Ascent (total) 1660ft/505m

Time 5.5 Hours

Sunset time 21:41

Map Explorer OL4 The English Lakes North-Western Area

Start Grid Ref NY174169


Hello everyone.
As seems to be the norm these days, I spend my days as we approach our outing keeping an ever watchful eye on the forecasts!
The weather becomes more unpredictable as times passes. (unless you live in the southeast of course!)
I note Peter wisely has an alternative route planned, (I wonder, Peter why not go from Buttermere to Braithwaite via Aard Crags that way the weather is mainly chasing you? just a thought).
So with the usual grumbles out of the way. The walk I've planned is one I haven't done for a number years, it takes into consideration the fickleness of the weather without going too high! Although as you'll read there is the option.

The walk starts at Buttermere village (after you have all used the facilities of course) and I've paid the nice lady at the cafe for allowing us to use their space for our parking.
We set out along the path between the lakes, when we reach the bridge at the end of the track we turn right (north west) to follow the western shore of Crummock water. We follow the path which passes around the end of the lake through the woods up to Lanthwaite Green farm. From Lanthwaite Green farm we make our way up Gasgale Gill to arrive at Coledale Hause between the summits of Crag Hill and Hopegill Head. How we proceed from here depends on the weather and willingness of those in the group! A choice of three potential routes is before us:-
1. continue down Coledale valley via the miners' track to Braithwaite.(easy)
2. ascend to Grizedale Pike then downhill direct to Braithwaite (medium)
3. ascend to Crag Hil descend via Sail then past Outerside to Braithwaite (hard)
Either route will bring us to our destination, I think you know where by now!
This walk I would class as moderate, with only one climb involved (about 500m/1600 ft) the rest is nearly level walking in lovely scenery.
Not a great turnout again sadly, although I'm the pot calling the kettle as Linda and I have not been with you this last two trips!
See you tomorrow
Regards,
John & Linda
30/4/2017 - LANGDALES

A Group Walk for the 30th April 2017

LANGDALES

Leader John Adams

Distance 9.3 miles/15 km/p>

Ascent (total) 3379 ft \1030 m

Time 6.5 Hours

Sunset time 20:41

Map OL5 - The English Lakes - South-Western Area

Start Grid Ref NY294063


Hello everyone.
After watching the forecasts closely for the last few days, it looks as though we may get at least a dry one! Albeit somewhat windy.
The walk I’m planning is one we did five years ago. As usual I have an alternative in case of rotten weather.
The walk commences at Dungeon Ghyll car park. After a flying visit to the loo’s we set off across the fields making for the Old Dungeon Hotel.
We cross the lane and walk through the campsite to the first of our ascents for today! This first ascent brings us to below Side Pike; here we cross the lane for the last time.
(Note- there is no path shown for this next part of the route) Leaving the Blea Tarn path we commence our second climb, this time our destination is Blake Rigg (530m\1739 ft)
Having negotiated our way to the summit we turn our faces to the next summit namely Pike of Blisco (705m\2313 ft) via Wrynose Fell.
After descending from Pike of Blisco we cross Brownie Gill to follow the path up toward the multiple summits of the Crinkles. Highest point (802m\2816 ft) on the way over them you’ll have an opportunity to climb up the bad step!
Once over the Crinkles we’ll arrive at the Three Tarns below the Bow Fell massif.
Finally we take the path down, first across Earing Crag then over White Stones down The Band to Stool End farm. From here the finish is a nice level walk back to the start of our day. Past the Old Dungeon Hotel and retrace our steps across the fields to the car park.

Today’s walk is a tough one. Lot’s of ascent! Some of it is across rough ground.
Not a great turnout this time, undoubtedly due to it being the Bank holiday weekend.
See you tomorrow
Regards,
John & Linda
16/4/2017 - HESKET NEWMARKET

A Group Walk for the 16th April 2017

HESKET NEWMARKET

Leader John Adams

Distance 11.8 miles \ 19 km/p>

Ascent (total) 2421 ft \ 738 m

Time 6.5 Hours

Sunset time 20:15

Map OL5 - The English Lakes - North-Eastern Area - North Sheet

Start Grid Ref NY362376


I've managed to get my walk sorted a bit earlier this week!
The weather is looking somewhat unpredictable, (normal then!), the walk is able to be modified on the day if conditions warrant it.
I planned this walk in August 2013, it didn't happen, no guesses as to why.
So perhaps this Sunday?
The walk commences at the hamlet of Millhouse, from here we’ll take the Haltcliff bridge road.
At the first bend we take to the footpaths leading ultimately to a farm called High Row, via Deer Rudding, Haltcliff Bridge and Scalerigg House on the way. From High Row we take to the tarmac briefly then leave it to pass through Bannest Hill & Linewath farms.
Taking the farm track back to the lane, we turn south along it for 500m until we spy a faint track heading off towards the imposing bulk of Carrock Fell.
Now commences a 425m/1400ft ascent, and in places, it has to be pointed out, is a little on the steep side! But at least we gain height quickly.
On attaining the summit (661m/2169ft) it’s the days highest point (higher than High Pike by 3m/10ft) Here we can see our next destination off to the north-west the aforementioned High Pike
. After walking over Round Knott, Miton Hill, Drygill Head & Harestones we arrive at High Pike (658m2159ft) Here we’ll have extensive views north, it might even be possible to spot ‘Criffel’ from four years ago.
Now we turn to the task of the descent, following the Cumbria Way we’ll pick our way down to Nether Row far below passing the old mine workings en route. We’ll take the quiet lanes into Caldbeck (time for a quick one!?) crossing the river Caldbeck we continue along the ‘Way’through Parson’s wood.
When we leave the trees its a straight downhill to recross the river via a footbridge.
The final stage is through a few fields then into our destination of Hesket Newmarket.
Here you’ll find the Old Crown pub and some tearooms, plus the coach of course.
Today’s walk is partly a strenuous one. The reason why is because there is a steep 1400ft ascent right in the middle! and that has some tricky bits in it too! The rest of the day is fairly undemanding
See you Sunday
Regards
John & Linda
5/2/2017 - HURST GREEN
Hello everyone.
The forecast is not looking to bad, hopefully dry at least. I had a choice of at least four walks planned, three of which were up to Longridge fell. (10, 11 and 16 miles respectively). So when I saw Peter had decided to go that way, I opted for my alternative route. Starting at Brockholes, just off the M6.
As a result, I suggest the coach passes through Ribchester toward Longridge, but turns just beforehand at the Corporation Arms toward Hurst Green. This will place Peter’s group at his planned start point ‘Moss Gate’ up to Longridge Fell.

A Group Walk for the 5th February 2017

HURST GREEN

Leader John Adams

Distance 12 miles/19.5 km

Ascent 1080 ft/330 m

Time 6.5 Hours

Sunset time 17:03

Maps 286 Blackpool & Preston - 287 West Pennine Moors

Start Grid Ref SD584300


The walk starts on the A59, almost as soon as we exit the M6.
Taking advantage of a handy bus stop, we return to the exit roads of the M6 to cross over the Ribble. The route today follows the ‘Ribble Way’ until we leave it at Trough House uphill to Hurst Green.
Once across the river we make our way through the ‘Brockholes’ nature reserve (formerly a gravel extraction site) heading towards the big woodland rising up on the hillside. We ascend through Boilton wood following the path in the woodland high above the river to our right.
After about a mile/1.5km the path plunges downhill to cross over Tun Brook then back up its far bank depositing us into a field then on to Elston lane. We leave the lane on a track passing Marsh House then back into the fields again.
The path passes behind Alston Hall and its Observatory, though whether we will see anything depends on the trees obscuring the view.
The ‘Way’ takes us past numerous farms namely:- (Lower Yew Tree farm, Stubbins Nook, Woodlands farm, Hothersall lodge, Hothersall Hall, Boat House and Lower Barn farm) before we reach Ribchester.
We leave Ribchester crossing Duddel brook then across the fields to Lower Dutton on ‘Gallows lane before returning to the riverside. Once through Haugh wood we leave the riverside to ascend the bank over to Hey Hurst farm, passing the farm brings us to Trough House.
It's here that we take our leave of the Ribble Way, we finish off the walk today along the track which takes us directly into Hurst Green.
Today’s walk is easy, although we do have our ups and downs. Watch out for the mud though. Definitely a day for wearing gaiters!!
See you tomorrow
Regards
John & Linda
22/1/2017 - CHIPPING
Hello everyone,
As per normal for the time of year the weather is playing silly buggers! Fine one day, then cloud deck almost zero the next!! So I’ve put together two walks, one up along the tops and the other out to Whitewell and back. So if its fine we go high, if not we stay lower down. We’ll decide when we arrive unless it’s very obvious beforehand.
For all of you who contributed to the gift Peter and I received, I’d like to thank you for your kind generosity and appreciation of what we do. Acknowledgement of ones efforts is a great incentive to carry on in the future. I’d also like to mention the roles that Linda and Janet carry out in the background, without whose help we would struggle to keep things running smoothly.
So, you’re thinking where’s the walks John!?
First, the higher route, be aware of the length of the walk could mean we finish with no time to visit the local hostelries. Especially, if the conditions under foot are bad and the weather decides to make life difficult.

A Group Walk for the 22nd January 2017

CHIPPING (Higher)

Leader John Adams

Distance 12.3 miles/19.8 km

Ascent 2011 ft/615 m

Time 6.5 Hours

Sunset time 16:36

Map OL41 Forest of Bowland & Ribblesdale (West Sheet)

Start Grid Ref SD622432


Today’s walk starts off in Chipping village, after a quick visit to the loo’s we turn our faces eastwards towards the sun? A couple of short stretches of road through the village sees us off towards Mellor Knoll way off in the distance.
We leave the tarmac shortly on the left, until we reach Whitemore Forest plantation 5km/3 miles away we pass various farms (and their potentially gloopy fields.) Namely, Leagram Hall farm, Chipping Lawn farm, Park Style, Lickhurst farm, Dinkling Green and lastly Higher Fence Wood.
Our path from the last farm takes us up to Whitemore wood, as we emerge from the upper part of the wood we’re high on the flank of Mellor Knoll (an extra 45m/147ft to the top) We pass through the wall/fence slightly downhill to the northwest, this puts our feet on a permissive path. The path takes us up the first real ascent today (227m/745ft) to the top of Totridge fell (496m/1627ft)
The path leads us southwest following the edges of Whitmore Fell and Fair Oak Fell. The fence we’re following leads us across the top of Burnslack Brook then to Saddle Fell above it. Continuing with the fence brings us to a corner? and a cairn?, here we turn south west towards Fairsnape Fell (510m/1673ft) and it’s lonely trig point.
We head south east from the trig point to find the path which then follows the wall to the summit of our final hill Parlick (432m/1417ft).
Like life it’s all downhill from here! Taking the ‘steep’ path directly down (200m/650ft) to Wildcock House we arrive at gentler terrain. So across numerous muddy fields to the lane at ‘Fish House’, then past ‘After Lee’ to finish down the lanes into Chipping.
Today’s walk is fairly strenuous. Watch out for the steep descent. The first 8km/5miles of the walk are easy, over the tops could be/will be boggy in places. If conditions deteriorate, route finding will be interesting! I expect there will be mud, so wear gaiters if possible!
And the lower route!

A Group Walk for the 22nd January 2017

CHIPPING (Lower)

Leader John Adams

Distance 11.2 miles/18 km

Ascent 1434 ft/437 m

Time 5.5 Hours

Sunset time 16:36

Map OL41 Forest of Bowland & Ribblesdale (West Sheet)

Start Grid Ref SD622432


Today’s walk starts off in Chipping village, after a quick visit to the loo’s we turn our faces eastwards towards the sun? A couple of short stretches of road through the village sees us off towards Mellor Knoll way off in the distance.
We leave the tarmac shortly on the left, until we reach Whitemore Forest plantation 5km/3 miles away we pass various farms (and their potentially gloopy fields.) Namely, Leagram Hall farm, Chipping Lawn farm, Park Style, Lickhurst farm, Dinkling Green and lastly Higher Fence Wood.
Our path from the last farm takes us down to Whitewell via New Laund farm.
Now, if the river Hodder is not too high we’ll cross over via the steeping stones, this will put us at the rear of the lovely Whitewell Inn. (I do have an alternative route if we can’t cross)
We cross the road and ascend to the gate and its steps into the fields, passing Seed Hill house we ascend to the edge of a disused quarry. Swinging to the right we head for and pass Higher Top Barn farm on towards Radholme Laund farm.
After passing through the farm we head downhill towards the woodland ahead to pass along its side. Continuing downhill the paths take us through Higher Lees farm before dropping on to a lane.
Leaving the lane after the junction we take to the fields again heading for Stakes on the banks of the river Hodder.
Turning south east we arrive at Doeford Bridge to cross the Hodder, a brief stretch along the tarmac finds us crossing over the river Loud. Then following its course up river to Gibson Bridge and Hotel we return to the black stuff a short Distance, before we once again clop through the fields.
After a kilometre we leave the mud behind to walk the final part of the walk in to the village of Chipping along the road.
Today’s walk is fairly easy. I expect there will be mud, so wear gaiters if possible!
We have an excellent turnout this trip, which is nice to see. Let’s hope the day is thoroughly enjoyed by everyone.
See you all tomorrow
Regards
John & Linda
8/1/2017 - CATON

A Group Walk for the 8th January 2017

Burton in Kendal Services to Caton

Leader John Adams

Distance 10.6 miles / 17 km

Ascent 600 ft/180m

Time 5.5 Hours

Sunset time 16:12

Map OL41 Forest of Bowland & Ribblesdale (West Sheet)

Start Grid Ref SD521761


Hello everyone,
Linda and I would like to wish you all a happy and most particularly a healthy New Year.
After the walk Sunday we have the Christmas meal to look forward to, we expect that it will be as good as last year’s excellent meal. Like Peter the walk I’ve planned is an easy one to start us out into 2017. We last did this walk in I think 2003?
I expect there will be plenty of mud along the way; I for one will have my gaiters on! Linda is too I believe!!
The walk commences at the motorway service station (Burton in Kendal).
Leaving the services we make our way along Tarn lane to pick up the Lancaster canal towpath at Yealand road bridge. Heading south we follow the towpath for nearly three miles until we reach Keer Bridge, passing the sadly defunct canal locks of Tewitfield along the way. Leaving the easy towpath behind, we now commence our first ascent of the day (only 200 ft) heading cross country to Over Kellet.(Here, we usually have lunch in the crags overlooking the valley).
Suitably replete, we continue on our way heading for the lane passing Swarthdale farm. Leaving the lane to the right we begin our second ascent of the day through Sidegarth farm over the low summit then down to the road at Chapel Wood. Turning right along the road we take the next lane on the left which descends quite steeply to Aughton Barns close to the River Lune.
The route parallels the riverbank as we head down stream, ignoring the big bend in the river looping away to our left. Instead we make for the point where the river looping back meets the woodland ahead of us. We climb the stile at the corner into the foot of the woodland and follow the path above the river until we reach the water pipeline bridge.
Crossing the bridge over the river to the other side puts us on a direct line alongside the riverbank to the Bull Beck car park, our pickup point by the coach.
Today’s walk is a very easy walk, firstly along the canal towpath then footpaths over low hills into the Lune Valley.
So there you have it.
We’ll have the new membership cards for anyone suitably organised to want one. But not to worry we’ll be catching you with them on the next few trips.
Regards
John & Linda

2016

11/12/2016 - AMBLESIDE

A Group Walk for the 11th November 2016

AMBLESIDE

Leader John Adams

Distance 8 miles / 13 km

Ascent 1015 ft / 310 m

Time 4 Hours

Sunset time 15:58

Map The English Lakes OL7 - South Eastern Area

Start Grid Ref SD446987


Hello everyone,
Well it’s the last walk for the 2016 list and the weather at present doesn’t look too threatening either! Like Peter I’m also doing a repeat walk, this was last done in 2013.
It’s a nice easy one; and it has less ascent than Peters walk too!! (Also I expect there’ll be mud aplenty) We’ll have plenty of time to roam around Ambleside afterwards; seeking out some of those last minute buys.

The walk starts at Ings on the A591; from here we take to the lane up to Grassgarth. The track from Grassgarth takes us about a kilometre, and then we’ll follow a bridleway into High Borrans. As we pass Borrans Reservoir we’ll take an unofficial detour across two fields, this will deposit us onto Dubbs Rd. Once past Dubbs Reservoir we’ll take another shortcut, this time across the hill, to finish up on Longmire track. Our route next takes us downhill through ‘The Howe’ onto the A592 near Troutbeck Church. We then make our way to Town End via the track alongside the church up to the village. From Town End we’ll ascend Robin Lane, pass through High Skelghyll farm then into Skelghyll Wood with the Jenkins Crag viewpoint down Windermere Lake. The final leg of our easy day is down to the A591 opposite ‘Hayes’ garden centre at Ambleside. Now you can head off in search of some last minute Christmas gifts or just plain browse the shops. The coach will, hopefully be parked near the recycling point near the river.
Today’s walk is only a short one and easy, this will allow you plenty of time in Ambleside.
Linda and I would like to wish you all a happy Christmas, and an even better 2017.
We shall have your Christmas meal organised for you next time out. You have booked it... Haven’t you?
Quick, quick ... Email now Christmas Meal
Regards
John & Linda
27/11/2016 - CARTMEL

A Group Walk for the 27th November 2016

CARTMEL

Leader John Adams

Distance 13 miles / 21 km

Ascent 1814 ft / 553 m

Time 6.5 Hours

Sunset time 16:00

Map The English Lakes OL7 - South Eastern Area - South Sheet

Start Grid Ref SD442828


Hello everyone,
As Peter has mentioned looks like a dry one at least!
Unusually it looks like Peter's walk and ours commence from the same place.
I expect we’ll find the ground underfoot to be a tad sodden in places. (Another way of saying lookout for mud!)
We start the day by disembarking from the coach at the bus stop on the A590 for Longhowe End (Halecat Gardens). We’ll take the underpass beneath the A590 to avoid damaging any fast moving cars. A short way along the road brings us to the Derby Arms (it'll be closed this early!) where we turn left following what was once the main road to Grange, Newby Bridge etc to the footpath proper to start our days exploration.
So on we go, through the small woodland, then down a bank across what will probably be damp low lying fields into a part of Nicholas Moss woods. Turning north we pass behind Halecat gardens into the far end of Witherslack by its church.
Cross the road then up a short steep ascent drops us on a bridleway that delivers us via Yewbarrow to Witherslack Hall farm. Taking the track to the west (we’ll do a lot of that today!) we meander through Lawns wood, the far edge of which returns us to the road of our earlier acquaintance.
A brief stretch down the lane brings us to our next path heading westwards across the river Winster valley bottom. Through Cow Head wood, crossing a lane then more woodlands whilst ascending to Height road. Another brief bit of tarmac bashing brings us to the next westerly footpath passing over the shoulder of Barrow Wife hill to a good track.
The track ends at the A590 near Ayside, we take another underpass to reach Ayside then westwards (again) to Seattle farm. Now we turn South past High Clark farm and Greenhurst farm then through the Great Allotment Woodland to Over Ridge farm. We leave the farm on the lane until we spy the next path on our right which leads us to Hill farm.
Being careful to get the correct path of five available should take us through Barns Bank Plantation to the last lane today. A little further down the lane finds the final path today, taking us through Park wood and straight across the race course into Cartmel.
This is a ‘long’ low level walk with a few minor ascents; however it is not a difficult walk.
Be aware we may not finish the day with time to spare!
See you Sunday
Regards,
John and Linda
13/11/2016 - TODMORDEN

A Group Walk for the 13th November 2016

TODMORDEN

Leader John Adams

Distance 9.5 miles / 15 km

Ascent 1552 ft / 473 m

Time 5.5 Hours

Sunset time 16:17

Map Explorer OL21 - South Pennines - South Sheet

Start Grid Ref SD862301


Hello everyone,
I’m assured by that very nice weather lady (Dianne Oxberry) on the BBC that we will have at least a dry day on Sunday, possibility of some sun?
I’d like to thank those members who came forward to offer their skills in leading the walks on the day. Not forgetting Janet who kindly took over the booking for us, thank you Janet. As you know Peter was dragged off to work (poor man), whilst Linda and I goofed off to the Sage at Gateshead to enjoy a wonderful concert.
We’ll be passing the Christmas meal menu around the coach for the next three trips to collect your meal selections. If there is anyone who finds themselves unable to join us before January 8th and would like to join us for the meal. Please mail us at Christmas Meal booking by email and we’ll sort out the details with you
We leave the coach on the A646 at Walk Mill.
We follow a couple of footpaths between the houses and exit the back of Walk Mill village via Cliviger Mill bridge towards Barcroft Hall and farm. From there we take the path out towards Cliviger Laithe farm, leaving the farm we make our way to the village of Hurstwood via various paths and bits of tarmac.
We join the Pennine bridleway at Hurstwood, which we’ll follow past the church leading us eventually to the Hurstwood reservoir.
We cross along the top of the reservoir dam, and then continue on over the slight hill ahead to Cant Clough reservoir. Once again we walk across another earthen work dam, at its far end we head off southwards still following the Pennine bridleway.
Our route departs the bridleway shortly after leaving the dam, we’ll make our way across the fields to the lane up ahead, and at the lane we join the Burnley Way for a short distance. We take our leave of the Burnley Way at Stiperden House farm.
From this point on the route becomes extremely winding and tricky to navigate as we pass through numerous out of the way places. We’ll pass Lower Mount farm, Mount Cross, Higher Intake farm, Dyke farm, Hartley Royd, Hudson Bridge, Orchan Rocks above Clunter(??) Lower Hartley, How Gate, East Whirlaw to arrive at the hamlet of Hole Bottom. Phew!
The easy final part of today's exploration continues downhill on the quiet back lanes into Todmorden.
This is a low level walk with a few minor ascents; however it is not a difficult walk. Anyone wishing to brush up their map reading/navigation skills will find parts of the route quite testing!
Fingers crossed for at least a dry one!
See you all Sunday
Regards,
John and Linda
16/10/2016 - NEWBY BRIDGE

A Group Walk for the 16th October 2016

HAWKSHEAD

Leader John Adams

Distance 11.6 miles / 18.6 km

Ascent 1770ft/ 540m (this the total of every bit of ascent)

Time 6 Hours

Sunset time 18:12

Map Explorer OL7 The English Lakes - South Eastern Area - South Sheet

Start Grid Ref SD501885


Hello everyone,
As you’ve probably guessed I’ve been watching the forecasts, sadly not good!
The day promises a belt of wet weather and Southerly strong winds passing northwards, morning to mid afternoon. Should pass over in about 4/5 hours?
So considering the delightful forecast I thought we would retread a route we did eight years ago.
It shouldn’t present any difficulties as its fairly low/mid level walking.

Starting on the A591 we leave the coach at the lay by just past Sizergh Castle and before Whetstone lane. We take the track up to Nether Wells farm then over to Holeslack farm via footpaths.
We take our leave of the farm track when exiting the woodland, going down the hill into Brigsteer village. Leaving the village we cross the Lyth valley floor making towards ‘Row’, from here we ascend Whitbarrow to Bell’s Rake.
We now descend past the fairies cave through the woods to the lane and along to Pool Park. Leaving the lane we pass through Cowclose wood crossing over the river Winster to Swallow Mire farm.
Climbing the steep lane up Cartmel Fell we branch off through Rankthorns plantation making for Foxfield. The next part of the walk takes us up and into Chapel House Plantation forestry, where we pass by Simpson Ground Reservoir.
On joining the bridleway we follow it through the rest of the plantation before it leads us steeply down into the village of Staveley in Cartmel. Sadly, the final part of the walk involves us walking along the main road.
This will bring us to the Swan Hotel at Newby Bridge, here we’ll wait for the coach to collect us.
This is a low/mid level walk with two main ascents; however it is not a difficult walk. Although it’s fairly long for this time of year
So see you tomorrow; don't forget your wet weather kit!
Regards,
John and Linda
02/10/2016 - SHINING TOR

A Group Walk for the 2nd October 2016

SHINING TOR from WHALEY BRIDGE

Leader Les

Distance 10 miles / 16 km

Ascent 1244ft/379m

Time 6 Hours

Sunset time 18:45

Map OL1 & OL24 The Peak District (Dark & White Peak areas)

Start Grid Ref SK011815

Starting from Whaley Bridge we proceed southwest to Toddbrook Reservoir then pick up the 'Midshires Way' south through Horwich End and Taxal to Overton Hall where we 'climb' west to Taxal Edge. We continue south for 5km on this wonderful ridge via Oldgate Nick and Cat's Tor until reaching Shining Tor (559m) the highest point Cheshire.
The descent along side the woods which contain Shooter's Clough and Errwood Hall bring us to Errwood Reservoir, which we cross at the north end and follow the dismantled railway line along Fernilee Reservoir on it's eastern shore.
At the dam we continue north by the River Goyt until reaching Whaley Bridge once more.
This is a fairly moderate walk on well used paths throughout, a total length of about 10 miles and an ascent of a mere 379m.
18/09/2016 - SEDBERGH

A Group Walk for the 18th September 2016

SEDBERGH VIA TEBAY

Leader John Adams

Distance 11 miles / 17.5 km

Ascent (total) 3265ft/995m (this the total of every bit of ascent)

Main ascent 363m/1200ft approx

Time 6 Hours

Sunset time 19:20

Map OL19 The Howgill Fells & Upper Eden Valley

Start Grid Ref NY702053


Hello everyone,
That nice lady on the telly says we’re going to have a dry day Sunday!! Yeah, right!
So holding that faint hope in mind I’ve put together a little outing for those of us venturing forth.
The walk commences on the A685 out of Tebay near Newbiggin on Lune.
We start off along the lane through Sandwath and at the T junction we continue straight on! First we cross over a low top called Pinksey as we ascend toward the summit of Green Bell (605m/1985ft) The path becomes considerably easier for a little while as we trudge along the broad ridgeline toward Randygill Top (624m/2074ft)
From here the next 3km/1.9miles is off any path, although there are usually faint tracks.
Throwing away 115m/380ft we descend over rough grass to the next summit called Kensgriff (574m/1883ft) We’ve had lunch here on previous visits; the view down the valley is lovely.
Well, having got here we’re now faced with the flank of Yarlside rearing up high above us, a very steep 115m/370ft ascent/climb!! Having attained Yarlside’s summit(639m/2096ft) we are faced with yet another steep descent. This time down to the Bowderdale beck, some 228m/750ft below. Again over rough grass.
We will need to cross the beck at the bottom, then ascend to the path above which will take us across and round the fellside to the final top, the Calf (676m/2218ft) the highest point in the Howgills.
For many of you the latter stages of the walk will be familiar, we pass over Bram Top then Calders after which is quite a sharp descent to Rowantree Grains Fold. There is one last pull uphill over Arant Haw, beyond is the long descent (some of it quite steep in places) into Sedbergh.
Today’s walk has a long ascent 365m/1200ft over 5km/3miles to the first summit. We’ll be off any paths for approx 3km/2miles on grassy hills. There are three main ascents, 363m/1200ft, 148m/485ft, 265m/870ft. Today’s walk is hard.
We have quite few members unable to be with us this weekend, due holidays, family and friend commitments.
So see you Sunday
Regards,
John and Linda
04/09/2016 - POOLEY BRIDGE

A Group Walk for the 4th September 2016

POOLEY BRIDGE

Leader - John Adams

Distance 14 miles / 22.5 km

Ascent (total) 2772ft/845m

Time 6.5-7 Hours

Sunset time 19:54

Map The English Lakes - Explorer OL5 South Eastern Area & OL5 North Eastern Area

Start Grid Ref NY401080


Hello everyone,
Well at the moment it looks like a dry day is in the offing, but there are still a few more hours before we set out!!
The walk is a little longer than our usual fare, but we have the option to travel along the eastern fells above Ullswater over some pretty obscure fells to Pooley Bridge.
A choice not put before us before, so I thought we’d give it a go!
The walk commences at Kirkstone Pass (Kirkstone Inn).
We take the path up over St Johns Bells Banner then on to Stony Cove Pike (763m/2503ft). Then descending steeply into Threshthwaite Mouth before climbing steeply out to Thornthwaite Crag & its Beacon (784m/2572ft).
Next we traverse the length of High Street (828m/2716ft today's high point) heading over Rampsgill Head (792m/2598ft) at its far end. Shortly after, we cross over High Raise (802m/2631ft) then begins the long slow descent into Pooley Bridge (a further 13.75km/8.5miles)
We pass over a succession of tops as we make our way on the long downhill.
1st - Red Crag - (711m/2333ft)
2nd - Wether Hill - (670m/2198ft)
3rd - Loadpot Hill - (671m/2201ft)
4th - Bonscale Pike - (520m/1706ft)
5th - Arthurs Pike - (530m/1739ft)
From Arthurs Pike we follow a good path down until we meet a wall; we then take the better track east. We forsake the track rather quickly as we have to cross a rather ‘damp’ section of fellside to join the next path round to Roehead.
At Roehead we step onto tarmac, this quiet lane leads us directly into Pooley Bridge.
The walk today is quite a strenuous one, in parts that is! It has two ascents of note, both about 220m/700ft each. The descent is a long one too.
See you Sunday, (and Monday if you go attend the AGM)
Regards,
John and Linda
24/07/2016 - KESWICK

A Group Walk for the 24th July 2016

KESWICK

Leader - John Adams

Distance 12.5 miles / 20.2 km

Ascent (total) 2867ft/874m

Time 6.5-7 Hours

Sunset time 21:21

Map Explorer OL4 - The English Lakes - North Western Area

Start Grid Ref NY255240


Hello everyone,
Just when you think the weather is settling to bring us reasonable weather!! The forecast looks decidedly poor. Of course the sun will be shining on the way home!.
So facing that prospect, I’ve decided to forgo my usual trip which I was looking forward to, up Helvellyn and the Dodd’s, for a route I had planned to do in April 2013. Needless to say that the weather put paid to that day’s trip too!
The walk commences at Keswick. We take the path to the bouncy suspension bridge over the River Derwent into Portinscale. We pass through Portinscale then the woodlands to find ourselves at the foot of Cat Bells (Linda’s favourite fell!) An easy 3k/1.5mile start.
So up we go over the Bells, however we don’t stop there!! as we carry on to the large flattened summit of Maiden Moor. The views to be had from along this ridge are some of the lakes finest, with all manner of summits to be seen.
Continuing our way south a little further along the ridge toward High Spy, highest point today here at 630m/2067ft, we take our leave of the heights down a path I have never explored before. This path takes us STEEPLY down (540m/1772ft of it) through crags called Nitting Haws to deposit us ultimately in the quaint village of Grange. (Toilets here)
Now you’ll be pleased to hear the rest of the day is a leisurely stroll back to Keswick along Derwent Waters eastern shore.
The walk today is quite a strenuous one, in parts that is! It has two STEEP ascents of 1000 ft each! The descent is a good one too at 540m/1800ft over 2.5k/1.5miles The final 9.5k/6miles is easy!
See you tomorrow, Regards,
John and Linda
10/07/2016 - REETH

A Group Walk for the 10th July 2016

REETH

Leader - John Adams

Distance 13 miles / 21 km

Ascent (total) 1740ft /530m

Time 7 Hours

Sunset time 21:38

Map OL30 Yorkshire Dales - Northern & Central Areas

Start Grid Ref SE046985


Hello everyone, It's six years since we last visited Reeth; just like our last time there it looks like the weather is not going to play nice this year either. I’m doing a walk I last did in June 2006 starting from near Reeth one of my rare circular walks, well almost a full circle.
The walk commences at Grinton. (The first third of today’s walk follows the Coast to Coast path) We start off nice and easy along the riverside heading toward Marrick Abbey, after which we ascend the delightful ‘Nunnery Steps’ into the sleepy Hamlet of Marrick.
Still following the C2C path we cross numerous fields until we reach Pillimire Bridge near Marske, here we leave the C2C route to explore the narrow part wooded valley of Marske Beck. After passing Orgate Force Falls we continue to follow the beck upstream to Helwith bridge passing Telfit farm on route.
Turning west along Shaw beck (another even smaller valley) we reach White Scar; here we strike out for Stelling Road passing the old disused working of Prys lead mine along the way. The road takes us to a tiny place called Hurst, following a track across Marrick Moor we arrive at Fremington Edge Top (highest point today at 1424ft/434m)
Here the ground falls away steeply 660ft/200m into the valley below. Our destination is now in view, however we don’t descend just yet! We continue along the ‘Edge’ until just past the disused radio mast. Plunging downhill past White House to the foot bridge over Arkle Beck, the path brings us finally into Reeth.
Although a long walk, the ascent is spread out all along the day’s route, all of it of a gentle nature. The final descent into Reeth will however make those knees tremble!
See you Sunday, Regards,
John and Linda
26/06/2016 - BUTTERMERE

A Group Walk for the 26th June 2016

BUTTERMERE

Leader - Les

Distance about 7 miles / 11 km

Ascent (total) 2150ft? / 650m?

Time 5 Hours?

Sunset time 21:45

Map OL4 The English Lakes - north western area

Start Grid Ref NY175169


Starting from the village of Buttermere we head toward Gatesgarth Farm along the eastern shore of the lake. From here we take Fleetwith Edge,the spine that elevates us to the 'Pike' (648m). The 'Edge' is steep and a little scrambling is required. From the summit we descend southerly to Dubs Quarry only to begin another ascent, to Haystacks. We should have plenty of time to linger on this complex mountain to investigate it's nooks, crannies and tarns. Also we may deviate from the normal path to reach the summit (597m) via a more northerly path that requires a bit more hands on rocks. The descent via Scarth Gap and the western shore of Buttermere is quite straight forward.
So not too long (about 7 miles) or too strenuous!
Regards,
Les
12/06/2016 - CHURCH STRETTON

A Group Walk for the 12th June 2016

CHURCH STRETTON

Leader - John Adams

Distance 12 miles / 19.3km

Ascent (total) 2657ft / 800m

Time 6.5 Hours

Sunset time 21:42

Map 217 The Long Mynd & Wenlock Edge

Start Grid Ref SO470960


Hello everyone
Like you, I'm thinking is that the lovely weather done for this year! Back to the usual, will it won't it, rain that is!! Well it seems very likely that it will tomorrow, normal service has been resumed.
I've thrown together a circular walk starting just north of Church Stretton. If the weather turns very poor we have numerous cut off points we could make use of, or if we run out of time.
So take a look.
The walk commences at the lay-by on the A49 just south of the B5477. On leaving the coach take the minor road off to the left making for Lower Botvyle farm. Looming above us is the bulk of Caer Caradoc hill (459m/1506ft) which is our first ascent (281m/922ft) of the day. Having walked to the other end of the summit we descend via Three Fingers Rock to pass alongside a small reservoir back to the A49.
Crossing the main road to the small lane opposite leads us into Small Stretton, we cross the B5477 looking for the bridle path that leads us to our next ascent. We leave the valley bottom ascending the flank of Bodbury hill, however we don't reach its top as we turn north east and make for the summit (482m/1581ft) of Haddon hill instead.
We drop onto a track which leads us to the 'Shropshire Way'. The way ahead is plainly visible as we walk along the top of the Long Mynd, heading for the summit (516m/1693ft) of Pole Bank. On reaching Pole Cottage we leave the obvious track as we start our slow descent back to the valley floor.
We make for Round (463m/1519ft) hill then following the steadily descending path we nip across to the top of Grindle (459m/1506ft, the same height as Caer Caradoc earlier today) Lastly we bob over to the Summit of Callow (411m/1348ft) then zoom down into Little Stretton.
We pass downhill through Little Stretton to cross the A49 yet again; the path we seek from here is off to the left. Having acquired the path; we commence our final trudge uphill today, we wind steadily upwards (220m/722ft) to the top of Ragleth hill (398m/1356ft). We're also back on the 'Shropshire Way' again. Here we can gaze down into Church Stretton far below us as we walk along the ridge. Descending off its far end we follow the 'Way' into the town, anyone know where the coach is??
Today's walk is STRENUOUS it has nearly a 300m/1000ft climb to start it off. Then we have several further ascents over another five tops. The walk then finishes with a last ascent of over 215m/700ft.
As Peter pointed out, 8:00 a.m. at Four Lane Ends. One single pickup for everybody.
So we’ll see you tomorrow Regards,
John & Linda
29/05/2016 - BROUGHTON in FURNESS

A Group Walk for the 29th May 2016

BROUGHTON in FURNESS (Black Coombe)

Leader - John Adams

Distance 10 miles / 16.2km

Ascent (total) 2600ft / 792m

Time 6.5 Hours

Sunset time 21:28

Map Outdoor Leisure OL6 - The English Lakes - South Western Area

Start Grid Ref SD130823


Hello everyone
I've been weather watching again, like you thinking will it or won't it be fine!
Well it looks like it may be a good day, dare I even suggest possibly even SUNNY! That's probably put the jinx on it now saying that.
Considering the reasonable forecast I'm going for Black Coombe, last trodden on November 2013; on a wet, cloudy and windy day, quite normal then!
So here is the walk.
The walk commences at the junction of the A595 & the A5093 near Silecroft. (spot height just 17m/56ft above sea level) We start out walking up the A595 to just before Sledbank, we leave the roadand take to the path which leads us steadily uphill, all the way to the summit of Black Combe. (600m/1968 ft) This is the main ascent today all 583m/1912ft of it!
Having attained the summit let's hope we have some of the all round views this fell is noted for, next we wander over White Combe Moss via Blackcombe and Whitecombe Screes to Stoupdale Crags.
We continue along the fellside above Black Crag out to Raven Crag at its far end, then descend to the farm track below.
We'll cross the field down to the footbridge and path to Fenwick farm, then follow the farm track round to the lane beyond Windy Slack farm. Leaving the lane by the next wall we follow the wall behind Thwaite Yeat farm to arrive on a bridle path. The bridle path then takes us steeply down to Duddon Bridge and returns us to the tarmac.
We'll cross the bridge (A595) and take the nice easy path along the river Duddon, the path returns us the A595 at the bottom of the short hill up to High Cross. Its now but a short distance into Broughton in Furness, we should find the coach on Station Rd near the old railway station buildings.

Today’s walk is ‘STRENUOUS’ it has a long (572m\1900 ft) climb to start it off. Then we have several further smaller ascents The walk becomes ‘easier’ when we leave the main fell.
So we'll see those brave/foolhardy souls who are out with us, tomorrow morning.
Regards,
John & Linda
15/05/2016 - ILKLEY via OTLEY

A Group Walk for the 15th May 2016

ILKLEY via OTLEY

Leader - John Adams

Distance 10 miles / 16.2km

Ascent (total) 950ft / 210m

Time 5 Hours

Sunset time 21:07

Map Explorer 297 Lower Wharfedale & Washburn Valley

Start Grid Ref SE202455


Hello everyone
It would appear that Peter has decided to do the ‘Bluebell Walk’ that I usually do when visiting Ilkley at this time of year.
An excellent choice if I may say so Peter, I hope your group enjoys it as much as we have in the past.
Well, in keeping with our previous visits to Ilkley, I too will be treading the same route.
The weather promises to be dry, sunny? Perhaps; for some of the day; although considerably cooler than of late. But DRY is good!!
So, the A+B walk below
The walk commences in Otley town centre, leaving the coach we make our way through various side roads to cross the River Wharfe via Otley Bridge.
We continue along Billam’s Hill Rd past the Hospital on Newall Carr Rd before turning into Richard Rd. then into David Rd.
On our right we find the path we seek hidden in the corner on the bend, this takes us out into the fields as we head for the Hamlet of Clifton.
Leaving Clifton we pass through Covey Hall farm to the end of Hallam Lane then through Grassgarth farm into Town Head.
From Town Head crossing some fields we pass Scales House farm on our way through more fields, woods and stiles to tramp along the quiet Smithy lane into Denton.
Following Denton Rd. a little way we find a track off the left which takes us along the boundary of West Park Wood (a good place for an afternoon break here!).
Now we carry on through yet more woodlands and streams to find ourselves above the village of Middleton.
Following the road on the right fork we walk along Slates Lane to the footpath down into ‘Coppy / Middleton Woods’ and it’s wonderful display of bluebells.
Lastly we pass by the old swimming pool then down to the riverside. Having crossed the River Wharfe you will find the coach near the Riverside Hotel and associated café.

Today we walk the lovely bluebell walk we’ve done before; the walk is an easy one with a couple of easy ascents and finishes with a slow descent into Ilkley

So we'll see those brave/foolhardy souls who are out with us, tomorrow morning.
Regards,
John & Linda
01/05/2016 - LANGDALES

A Group Walk for the 1st May 2016

LANGDALES

Leader - John Adams

Distance 10.1 miles / 16.3km

Ascent (total) 2070ft / 631m

Time 5.5 Hours

Sunset time 20:43

Map OL6 & OL7 The English Lakes - South Western & Eastern Areas

Start Grid Ref NY294063


Hello everyone
It would seem that the weather has decided to be its usual unpredictable self, keeping us wondering just how good/bad it's going to be. Having watched its convolutions over the past week, it comes as no surprise (due last minute weather fronts) that it's looking pretty grim. With this forecast in mind I'm leaving the higher fells until another day. I wonder if the other leaders amongst us will venture afield? This is what I intend doing instead.
The walk commences at the Langdales car park. Leaving the car park we make our way across the fields to the Old Dungeon Gill, we take to the lane briefly then pass through the camp site to begin our first ascent of the day which will take us to just below Side Pike. Crossing over the lane we make our way through the plantation above Blea Tarn and then descend briefly along the shoreline itself heading back toward the lane once more.
Turning left on the lane for a short distance we head for Blea Tarn house. Here we take our leave of the lane to begin our next ascent onto Lingmoor, the highest point of the day at 1312 ft.
From here we can enjoy the views across Little Langdale spread out far below us.
Now we begin the descent towards Dale End farm where we take the track off to our left into Sawrey's Wood and the quarries below Yew Crags. The path takes us to the banks of Great Langdale beck and the Cumbria Way which we follow into Elterwater village. From the village we follow the Cumbria Way into the woods on the shore of Elterwater.
We leave the Cumbria Way in these woods to climb onto Little Loughrigg and then through the caravan park onto the lane. Turning left once more we walk through Tarn Foot to the path under the lee of Ivy Crag which we then leave to head off in a south-easterly direction making for the view point overlooking Ambleside and Waterhead.
Having looked your fill we now make for Brow Head farm. Following the track down and crossing the lane to pass through Rothay Park to arrive at our destination of Ambleside. The coach will collect us at Fisherbeck car park on its way out of Ambleside.
Due to the poor weather forecast I have decided to do a low level walk out to Ambleside via Blea Tarn and Elterwater.
So we'll see those brave/foolhardy souls who are out with us, tomorrow morning.
Regards,
John & Linda
17/04/2016 - CALDBECK

A Group Walk for the 17th April 2016

CALDBECK

Leader - David Wood

Distance 13.5 miles / 21.7 km

Ascent (total) 2540 ft / 774 m

Time 7 Hours

Sunset time 20:21

Map OL4 & OL5 The English Lakes - North Western & North Eastern Areas

Start Grid Ref NY323397


Hi all,
Sorry it's a little late but here's what's available for you on Sunday. The Cumbrian fells may receive a bit of snow on Friday Evening and/or Saturday daytime although the forecast is for a clear day on Sunday. Also, as John and Linda are away on holiday this Sunday, they'd asked David Wood if he would lead an 'A' walk and here is what he's decided upon. David indicates that it's quite a long walk, though not overly strenuous and with the weather forecast currently good with rain not expected on Sunday. David has also indicated that with very little cloud and a little sunshine, clear views should be available, albeit that it may be a bit breezy on the tops with the possibility that that may bring a considerable wind chill. That won't put us off though will it?
See you on Sunday,
Pete
Today's walk starts at Caldbeck, a village located on the northernmost edge of the Lake District. Its most famous former resident is the hunter John Peel, who is the subject of the nineteenth century song 'D'ye ken John Peel'. His grave is in the local churchyard.
We head south for 3.5 miles and join the road leading to the small hamlet of Nether Row. Here we meet the Cumbria Way, which we follow all the way to High Pike in the Caldbeck Fells. This north-east corner of the district is known as 'back o' Skidda'.
From the summit of High Pike (658m; 2,158ft) we continue on the Cumbria Way for a short distance to Hare Stones where we head south west, climbing about 400 feet, to Great Lingy Hill then on to Iron Crag, Little Lingy Hill and Knott (710m; 2,329ft).
Next we descend the gentle north-west slope of Knott for just over half a mile to Great Sca Fell (651m; 2,135ft) and continue on a path past Little Sca Fell to Lowthwaite Fell.,br> Our route then takes us to the cairn at the summit of Longlands Fell (483m; 1584ft), which we descend on the north side to rejoin the Cumbria Way. We follow this for just over 3 miles in an easterly direction, going through Branthwaite and Fell Side, before turning north on a path taking us through the village of Wath back to Caldbeck.
03/04/2013 - BRAITHWAITE

A Group Walk for the 3rd April 2016

BRAITHWAITE

Leader - John Adams

Distance 13 miles / 21 km

Ascent (total) 3238 ft / 987 m

Time 7 - 7.5 Hours

Sunset time 19:52

Map OL4 The English Lakes - North Western Area

Start Grid Ref NY236236


Hello everyone,
Like Peter I’ve been watching the forecasts with fingers crossed, as he states we may get a bit of everything! Maybe even sunshine.
My plan for the day is to visit a fell I haven’t been over in many years, namely Aard Crags, so I thought it was about time to remake its acquaintance.
So below you’ll find the details of the day to come.

After leaving the coach at the lay-by, we’ll walk into Braithwaite where there are loo’s available! Suitably sorted we make our way to the rear of the village; here we start up the hill aiming for Barrow Door or Outerside whichever takes your fancy.
Our path works its way round the flank of Scar Crags into the hause below Sail. Today however we aren’t ascending Sail, instead we take to the faint footpath plunging downhill towards Sail Beck. The path contours along the sides of Wandope & Whiteless Breast until we spy Swinside Gill on the other side of the beck.
It now becomes necessary for us to cross Sail Beck, because our intended route is over Knott Rigg (556m/1824ft) then along the lovely ridge walk to Aard Crags (581m/1906ft) The steep descent at the far end takes us over Aitkin Knott down to Birkrigg and the Newlands road.
We’re not long on the tarmac, taking the right hand lane through Stair we cross over Newlands Beck to the footpath following the beck down the valley. At Little Braithwaite we re-cross the beck, still following its bank into Braithwaite and the pub perhaps?
Today’s walk is fairly strenuous, with two main ascents. (545m/1790ft & 350m/1150ft)
The descent off Aard Crags is 457m/1500ft over 3km/1.8miles
The final 5km/3miles into Braithwaite is nice and easy.
See you tomorrow
Regards,
  John & Linda

20/03/2016 - CASTLETON

A Group Walk for the 20th March 2016

CASTLETON

Leader - John Adams

Distance 11.6 miles / 18.6 km

Ascent (total) 1675 ft / 510 m

Time 6 - 7 Hours

Sunset time 18:25

Map Explorer OL1 - The Peak District - Dark Peak Area - East Sheet

Start Grid Ref SK103925


Hello everyone,
Most unusually we’ve had some exceptionally steady weather this past week, and it looks set to continue. At least to Tuesday!
Having pored over the map for the Castleton area, I decided to do a walk I last did in 2008 but with a different middle section this time.
I’m crossing over the hilltop instead of around it into Edale; hopefully it won’t be too wet up there.
My walk requires the coach to pass through Glossop and the Snake Pass; I’ve not seen Peters walk so I hope that we don’t clash regarding walk starting points.
Today’s walk starts literally in the middle of nowhere!
We take our leave of the bus high on the A57 Snake pass road. The start is below the main road alongside Lady Clough, which we follow for about 4km/2.5 miles.
We leave the woodlands behind and cross the stream to the path along the hill. Then ascending via Gate Side Clough (290m/950 ft) to start contouring along the top of the hillside. When we reach a point above Blackden Edge we turn due south hopefully passing the trigpoint on the way to the opposite side of the hilltops.
Having arrived next to ‘Ringing Roger’ we plunge downhill to Grindsbrook Booth & Edale the starting point of the famous ‘Pennine Way’ Leaving Edale we cross the valley floor via the railway line then the River Noe before commencing the ascent to Hollins Cross on the ridge above.
The latter stages of our day now take us toward Winnats Pass via Mam farm & Little Mam Tor. On reaching the Blue John Cavern we turn downhill for the final stage of the day, passing the Treak Cliff Cavern then the Speedwell Cavern before finishing the day in Castleton.
Perhaps if time permits we can have a quick look at the Peak Cavern (The Devils Arse) before we finish our day in the local hostelries. The coach will be found in the main car park adjacent to the Information Centre.
Today’s walk is fairly strenuous with two main ascents over the day. The last one being quite near the end of the walk
Fingers crossed for a good day, albeit a cloudy one!
See you tomorrow
Regards,
  John & Linda

06/03/2016 - MARSDEN

A Group Walk for the 6th March 2016

MARSDEN

Leader - John Adams

Distance 13.3 miles / 21.4 km

Ascent (total) 2723ft / 830m

Time 6.5 - 7 Hours

Sunset time 18:00

Map Explorer OL21 - The South Pennines - South Sheet

Start Grid Ref: SD929119


Hello everyone,
Having just watched the forecast for Sunday I was pleasantly surprised to see they’ve given a DRY day and possibly some SUNSHINE!!!!
Well let’s not get too excited just yet, but it would be nice wouldn’t it?
I see that Peter is unable to be out with us, sadly having to work! That said it’s great to see that David has very kindly offered to lead in his stead, thank you David.
As to what I’ve got planned for you lucky(?) people, read on:-
The walk commences at the M62 Junction 21.
After quickly jumping off the coach, we cross the motorway link road to a quiet side road which takes us slightly uphill to cross over the M62 to Dig Gate farm and Garside farm. The route climbs to join the ‘Rochdale Way’ (only a little climb), we follow the Rochdale Way past the radio mast then down into the valley bottom. After crossing the A663 and railway we climb back out of the valley through Top O the Hill farm then round the side of the hill toward Ogden reservoir. Crossing the A640 puts us on the path through the woods above the dam of Ogden reservoir.
We follow numerous paths firstly across Longden End Brook then around the back of Nicholas Pike, which will bring us back to the ‘Rochdale Way/Station to Station walk’ at the end of Piethorne Reservoir. The rest of today’s walk route now follows the ‘Station to Station Walk into Marsden over the moor tops.
As we arrive in Marsden we’ll see the Standege tunnels (one canal the other rail) The canal has no tow path, and it took 17 years to dig! An empty boat took 1.5 hours to pass through with two men ‘legging’, seemingly a fully loaded boat could take up to 4 hours!! The horses were taken over the top to await the emergence of some very leg weary canal men. Nowadays they just use the engine.
For those of you who have been members for at least 4 years you may remember this walk from our previous visit in May 2013. Let’s hope that newer members who elect to walk with us will enjoy the experience.
See you Sunday Regards,
  John & Linda

21/02/2016 - CONISTON

A Group Walk for the 21st February 2016

CONISTON via TORVER

Leader - John Adams

Distance 11.25 miles / 18 km

Ascent (total) 1250 ft / 380 m

Time 6.5 Hours

Sunset time 17:33

Map Explorer OL7 The English Lakes - South Eastern Area

Start Grid Ref: SD329843


Hello everyone,
As you will all be very aware, the forecast is rubbish! So like Peter I've deferred the harder walk I had planned for another time! Instead I'll retrace my steps of January 2011 as you'll read more about below.
We should be out of the worst of the weather most of the route, except when crossing above Coniston Water that is. Fingers crossed the weather will play nice for this part of the day!
The walk commences at the River Rusland on the A590. Disembarking from the coach near the bridge over the Rusland, we head northwards walking through Ashes Intake Woodland in the direction of Bouth. Just before Bouth we turn, past Old Hall farm through Dockney Parrock Woodland almost to the church tower of Colton, but same as before we swing away before it to cross fields in to Oxen Park. Leaving behind the Hamlet of Oxen Park we ascend Spy Hill passing by Abbot Park into Park End Wood and on to Stock farm.
Crossing Bletherbarrow Lane (lovely names don't you think?) we go through part of Arklid Great Wood then past High Bethecar farm. Now we cross the flank of Bethecar Moor with extensive views across Coniston Water and the fells beyond. Descending quickly across the fellside we drop down to a track which takes us toward Low Parkamoor.
From here we commence a 250 ft ascent up to the high point called 'The Park' then enter into part of the extensive Grizedale Forest. From the forest we have a choice of two routes down the hillside, one past Lawson Park and the back of Brantwood then Low & High Bank ground, the other route takes us downhill to Town Head where the two routes rejoin. Lastly we walk around the Lake head & alongside the road into Coniston.
We'll find the coach at the School as usual.
This is a mid level walk with some ascents, however it is not a difficult walk and there are some lovely views to be seen of Coniston Water and the fells beyond.
(Weather permitting of course!)
Pity about the forecast, and it was such a nice day last Sunday too!
My group will be leaving the coach early, at least 40 minutes before Coniston.
See you tomorrow. Regards,
  John & Linda

24/02/2016 - INGLETON

A Group Walk for the 24th January 2016

Ingleton via Clapham

Leader - John Adams

Distance 12.2 miles /19.5 km

Ascent (total) 750m/2460 ft

Time 7 Hour

Sunset time 16:38

Map OL2 Yorkshire Dales (west sheet)

Start Grid Ref: SD745691


Hello everyone,
Doesn't look like we'll have the snow that Fylde had to contend with last week does it!
Instead we're likely to get some of that wet stuff (for a change!)
It seems that both A & B walks start the same, at least to the summit of Ingleborough.
THEN THIS......I've opted for some off piste exploring across Twistleton Scars on the return leg of my jaunt this Sunday.
With the distinct possibility of a bit of wall climbing thrown in, (Although I don't expect any real difficulties)
I wonder what Les or Dave has planned??
So this is my planned route, quite long for the time of year
We leave the coach in the village of Clapham, after the loo's we cross the stream and go up to the top of the village. Depending on if there's someone to collect the entrance fee or not, we'll either go along Clapdale drive or via the farm track until they meet in the valley below Ingleborough Cave.
Passing over the bridge next to the cave entrance we walk through the quite impressive Trow Gill leaving via the easy scramble at the far end. The path is easy to follow as we make our way toward Ingleborough; we'll have a little detour over to Gaping Gill to see how much of the wet stuff its gulping down. Then we have the main ascent of the day (310m/1017ft) to the summit of Ingleborough (today's highest point 723m/2372ft)
Unlike the 'B' group we turn away from the route down past Crinna Bottom, instead we descend via the steep steps to Humphrey Bottom and make for Chapel Le Dale via Souther Scales farm. Having past through Chapel Le Dale (a quick look at the church perhaps) we take the track up the hill.
(At this point I plan to leave the comfort of a path or track to traverse Twistleton Scars, there is a very strong likelihood that we'll need to climb some walls, possibly 3 or more!!) We leave the track below Scales cottage and cross the small fields onto Twistleton Scars, a wide ledge across the side of the hill. Having negotiated the unmarked Scars we'll arrive at Twistleton Scar End, where we'll descend past Twistleton Hall & Beezeys farms on the way down to the stepping stones across the River Doe. Having crossed the Doe (assuming the stepping stones aren't underwater!) we cross the soggy fields up the road (B6255). Upon reaching the first cottage we follow the track past it down to the riverbank which brings us into our destination of Ingleton. The coach should be parked on the old railway station adjacent to the big viaduct.
Today's walk is a moderate one with one main ascent of 310m/1017ft about a third of the walk in. Be aware that I plan to walk off piste for a least 4km/2.5miles with walls to climb over!! We'll have at least three cut off points should the weather not play nicely.
It has to be pointed out that although limestone country makes for mainly drier conditions underfoot; the limestone itself can be very slippery when wet.
So fingers crossed for a least a dry day.
Regards,
  John & Linda

10/01/2016 - GARSTANG

A Group Walk for the 10th January 2016

GARSTANG

Leader - John Adams

Distance 10 miles / 16.2 km

Ascent (total) 905 t / 275 m

Time 5 Hours

Sunset time 16:14

Map OL41 Forest of Bowland (west sheet)

Start Grid Ref: SD511409


Hello everyone,
Linda and I would like to wish each and every one of you a happy New Year. Apart from those of you who've already ventured out with Fylde last week, this is our first walk of the year.
The walk isn't a particularly hard or long one (long enough for the time of year though)
It will be made more strenuous by the fact that we'll be trudging through soggy areas throughout the day. We'll finish our walk at the Garstang Club; the coach will be there so we can change footwear etc before going in.
Fingers crossed for at least a dry day!
We leave the coach on the A6 at the roundabout entrance to Barton Grange garden centre.
Walking a short distance along the A6 brings us to the Land Rover garage; here we walk through the garage grounds onto the footpath to the west coast main railway line.
The trains pass through here around the 100mph mark so have a very good look before you cross, If you miss seeing it, you certainly won't hear it!
We find ourselves on the side of the river Brock; we'll be following the course of the Brock for about 6km/4 miles. We pass Brock Side, Walmsley bridge, Brock Bottom and Brock Mill until we reach the bottom of Snape Rake Lane.
Crossing the footbridge over the river we start our main ascent today (108m/355ft) towards the top of Delph lane. This is the highest point today at 212m/695ft, if the weather is clear you'll have great views.
When we arrive at Delph wood we take the footpaths towards the church in the trees of distant Church wood. Passing through the church grounds we take the path into the woodlands, where we come across the river Calder.
The path traces the bank of the river to deliver us into the northern end of Calder Vale, we walk down the road through the village crossing over the Calder river. We then leave Calder Vale at its southern end still following the side of the river Calder.
The path leaves the riverbank to ascend about 50 m/160ft over the hill to Sullom Side farm to deposit us on Stricklands lane. Turning northwards along the lane the next footpath on the left takes us down through Luca's farm then past Lower House farm.
We continue downhill crossing over Parkhead lane then past Bailton's farm over the M6 & railway line. Following the faint path to the bridge over the canal then crossing three fields we land on Dimples lane.
Turning left we walk to the next corner and take Calder house lane up to the main road (B6430) its but a short distance off to the left to the entrance road into the Garstang club where we'll be having our meal until time to be returned home.
Today's walk is an easy one with only one ascent of 108m/355ft at the half way point.
However, I would expect OODLINGS of mud today!

We plan to run the football card after the walks in the room reserved for us, Linda has suggested the winner will receive their meal for free, an excellent idea we thought.
Although we will have the membership cards with us we do not expect everyone to have brought sufficient funds with them to cover fare, meal & drinks etc.
We can always collect it on the following trips.
See you Sunday!!
Regards,
  John & Linda


2015

13/12/2015 - KENDAL

A Group Walk for the 13th December 2015

KENDAL

Leader - John Adams

Distance 11.8 miles / 19 km

Ascent (total) 1090 ft / 332 m

Time 5.8 Hours

Sunset time 15:52

Map OL7 The English Lakes South Eastern Area

Start Grid Ref: SD529792


Hello everyone,
Just watched our Diane on the BBC North-West weather forecast and it looks set for at least a dry day, albeit somewhat cloudy.
Redline rang me to ascertain if we were venturing out this weekend, as the forecast seemed like a good one (no rain) we confirmed we would be out.
We’re still taking any orders for the Christmas meal on the 10 January next year.
So if you’re not out before then and would like to be included please e mail me here ( wyreramblers@talktalk.net ) and we’ll get you a place and meal arranged.
Here’s what I’ve got planned for you lucky people this Sunday.
We leave the coach on the A6070 at Holme Park farm, we take the footpath uphill until we reach the faint path on the left.
The faint path ascends steadily until we reach the top, close to Farleton Knott summit.
If it should be clear you’ll have a grandstand view of the M6 far below.
Next we commence our descent but we don’t go off the end of the fell, instead we descend the eastern flank making for Puddlemire Lane.
Crossing the lane on to the track to Aikbank farm we follow the path through the farm across to Nook Bridge.
Crossing the bridge we walk along Dovehouses lane to the canal, where we take to the towpath heading north.
We keep to the towpath until we reach bridge No 167, beyond Crooklands, here we leave the canal via the bridge then uphill slightly to pass through Carter House & Old Hall farms.
Our route takes us steadily northwards via Stubbs farm to Row End in the village of Summerlands.
Turning north-westerly we make for another little village called Sedgwick crossing various fields and lanes on the way.
It’s from Sedgwick that we rejoin what was once the canal, sadly long since filled in, however we follow its course moving northwards once again.
The ghost canal parallels the river Kent off to our left (the source of grief for many people in Kendal lately).
We have a nice easy finish to our day as we track the lost canal into the Heart of Kendal, once there it is a matter of finding a dry pub (underfoot that is!!) until it’s time to be returned home.

Today's walk is an easy one with only one ascent of 200m/660ft at the start of the day. However I would expect copious amounts of mud today!
So we'll see you Sunday
Regards,
  John & Linda

29/11/2015 - BOWNESS

A Group Walk for the 29th November 2015

BOWNESS via STAVELEY

Leader - John Adams

Distance 10.5 miles /16.8 km

Ascent (total) 461m/1512 ft

Time 6 Hours

Sunset time 15:59

Map OL7 The English Lakes South Eastern Area

Start Grid Ref: SD501886


Hello everyone,
No need for me to point out the atrocious weather we have in prospect for tomorrow!!
Like Peter & Les I’ve debated as to a route which would, perhaps, mitigate some of the weathers worse efforts to spoil our day.
So I’ve decided to start out near Sizergh heading North westerly then swing round to the north east making for Staveley.
That way we’ll have a nice dry place to wait for the coach. Eagle & Child or Brewery?

We leave the coach on the A591 at the lay-by just beyond Sizergh Castle.
Taking the track up to Nether Wells farm, then on to Holeslack farm we eventually bring up on Brigsteer Rd.
Our route now takes up along the first part of Scout Scar to the cairn high above Barrowfield farm.
The path now leads us steeply down, passing through Barrowfield farm into Barrowfield Lot (woodland) and on to Garth Row lane.
We quickly cross the fields to Tullythwaite house on Thorns lane, the tarmac takes us on to Chapel Bridge. At Chapel Bridge we take the footpath near the bridge across to ‘The Broom’ (a cottage).
After walking through ‘The Broom’ then crossing another lane we continue uphill past Mountjoy wood across a quite wide expanse of open ground to Low Fold farm.
The path continues on past Low Fold on its way to High House, just before High House we turn right down a track to Brow Head.
Turning right on the lane we take the next track on our left at Milldam, we follow this winding track to Spigot House.
Taking to the path uphill to ‘The Howe’ we cross over the B5284 at ‘Sunnybrow’ to continue along the path past Boxtree farm to Yew tree farm.
Taking the northerly path out of the farm we cross various fields to the lane which is on the ‘Dales Way’
We stay on the ‘Way’ from here; the route will bring us into Staveley where we’ll await the coach on its return journey.

Today's walk is a moderate one with at least four ascents, none of which are over 300ft.
But over the day they add up to 1300 ft!
It may be an idea to bring along a change of clothing to leave on the coach, just in case the weather gets past your waterproofs!
So we’ll see those brave (foolhardy?) souls who are out tomorrow.

See you tomorrow.
Regards,
  John & Linda

01/11/2015 - BROUGHTON

A Group Walk for the 1st November 2015

BROUGHTON in FURNESS via Torver

Leader - John Adams

Distance 10.6 miles / 17 km or 10 miles / 16.3 km

Ascent (total) 2956 ft / 904 m or 640 m / 2100 ft

Time 7 Hours or 5.5 Hour

Sunset time 16:40

Map OL6 The English Lakes South Western Area

Start Grid Ref: NY252916


Hello everyone,
I see Peter has been called into work at late notice this Sunday! Must be a bit annoying I would have thought so late in the day!!
Like Peter I'm wondering if some willing member is prepared to offer their services as leader for the day. Now's your chance to practice your navigation skills!
They needn't worry; they'll get lots of help and encouragement from the rest of the group.
Notice the much earlier Sunset time.
I suggest we leave Broughton at 17:00hrs. This should give us sufficient time to complete our walks
So what do I have planned for you lucky people?
The walk commences on the A593 at Hole Beck, some 4.25km/2.6miles south of Torver.
We start the day with a 250m/820ft ascent from the main road up Cat Bank to the quiet Hummer lane.
We leave the lane almost immediately as we take to the forestry track down into the pinewoods.
After meandering along various paths we find ourselves on the tarmac through Stephenson Ground.
When we reach Broadslack Beck we take the decision -
do we ascend to the summit of Caw (529m/1736ft) an ascent of 269m/880ft then descend to Long Mire valley high point.
or continue up the Long Mire valley to the highest point.

Either way from the Long Mire valley we next ascend to the summit of Fox Haw (385m/163ft).
After Fox Haw we'll pass Stainton ground disused quarries on our way to the lane below Stickle Pike(375m/1230ft), our next point of call.
On our ascent, we'll pass the attractive Stickle Tarn perched on the hillside below the summit.
Whilst on the Pike summit we'll be able to see our final fell of the day, 'Great Stickle' (305m/1001ft) south from where we're stood.
Making use of the higher ground we work our way round to Great Stickle, having taken your photos we'll commence our last descent.
We pick our way down past Little Stickle to the path across to Pickthall Ground farm, then along the lane past Wood House.
We leave the tarmac at Hartley Ground farm as the path passes through Hawthwaite How & Hagg to the A593.
The final leg passes through West Park into the village of Broughton in Furness, the coach should be waiting for us on Station Rd.

The walk today is fairly strenuous.
We'll have 'numerous' ups & downs as we traverse the Broughton Fells.
We have a good turnout this Sunday; all we need now is for the weather to play nice!
My walk does allow for the group to split and rejoin after Caw, so anyone not wishing to climb Caw is able to avoid doing so.
This means they will do the shorter/lower route, whilst still being included on the A walk.

See you tomorrow.
Regards,
  John & Linda

18/10/2015 - AMBLESIDE

A Group Walk for the 18th October 2015

AMBLESIDE

Leader - John Adams

Distance 11.8 miles / 19 km

Ascent (total) 3113 ft / 949 m

Time 7 Hours

Sunset time 18:10

Maps OL5-OL7 The English Lakes South Eastern - North Eastern Areas

Start Grid Ref: NY373040


Hello everyone,
I'm a little late posting out the walk this time! We've been down near London and only just returned home, hence the delay.
At least the weather looks set to be dry although somewhat cloudy.
So, what delights await you this Sunday?
We did this walk last on 27/02/2011
The walk commences from the coach park near the river in Ambleside.
We set out at the North end of Ambleside taking the A591 until we reach Rothay Park.
Having enjoyed the pleasant stroll through the park track we commence our ascent at its far end.
The first uphill is via a Steep ascent to Nab Scar then over Lords Crag towards Heron Pike. (2008ft/612m)
Continuing along the ridge we see ahead of us Great Rigg (2513 ft/766m) our next port of call.
Still upwardly mobile, the highest point of the day beckons us on, Fairfield (2864ft/873m).
This notorious summit has a richly deserved reputation for sending folks off in the wrong direction in bad weather.
Assuming all goes well, we should find ourselves at the next summit, namely Hart Crag (2697ft/822m)
The wide path leads us onward (and downward) to the broad summit of Dove Crag (2598ft/792m).
Ignoring the path of to our left (Bakestones Moss) we follow the ridgeline (downhill all the way) passing over High Pike (2152ft/656m) then Low Pike (1667ft/508 m)
Once past High & Low Brock Crags we'll take the usual path straight on through Nook End farm.
All that remains is to meander down the quiet roads into the bustle that is Ambleside.

The walk today is strenuous, although having attained the summit of Fairfield 'most' of the return route is fairly undemanding. The exception being High & Low Pikes! Where it can be a little tricky over the rocks
I hope this isn't a repeat of the Fylde's route last weekend! I believe they were doing the Fairfield round, hopefully the other way round. See you tomorrow then
Regards,
  John & Linda

04/10/2015 - TEBAY

A Group Walk for the 4th October 2015

TEBAY via SEDBURGH

Leader - John Adams

Distance 9.5 miles / 15.3 km

Ascent (total) 2620 ft / 798 m

Time 6.5 Hours

Sunset time 18:42

Map OL19 The Howgill Fells

Start Grid Ref: SD698970


Hello everyone,
We've been watching the forecasts avidly, thinking to ourselves it'll no doubt break before this Sunday!
Surprise, surprise it looks like we may have quite a good day, although somewhat cloudy.
I'm doing a slight variant on a route last undertaken in April 2008.
Most of it is on good paths; however there is some rougher ground to cover in our explorations.

The walk commences at the Cross Keys on the A683.
Leaving the coach we set off for the imposing sight of Cautley Spout waterfalls at the valley head (a mere 820 ft\250m ascent).
After the steep ascent we arrive at the Calf (today's highest point 2218 ft\676m) to survey the Howgills stretching Northwards before us.
Leaving the Calf we pass over Bush Howe, Breaks Head, Stowgill Brow, Wind Scarth, Bleagill Head & Weathercalf Moss to arrive on Simon's Seat (1926 ft\587m).
Taking the ridge leading Northwest over Middleton brings us to a Trig Point at its far end, from here we descend into the valley over 650 ft below. Note the old stone bridge over Langdale Beck off to the right.
We continue on around Uldale End (bit of a steep climb here!) to find the path which winds round the far end of Weather Hill.
Then passing above Waskew Head farm we make use of its track into our destination of Tebay.

The walk today is a 'moderately strenuous ' one.
It starts with the STEEP ascent alongside Cautley Spout to the Calf.
Be advised, there are parts of today's walk negotiating fells with no paths shown!

So we’ll see you Sunday
Regards,
  John & Linda

06/09/2015 - GRASSINGTON

A Group Walk for the 6th September 2015

GRASSINGTON

Leader - John Adams

Distance 14 miles / 22.5 km

Ascent (total) 1200 ft / 365 m

Time 6.5 Hours

Sunset time 19:51

Map OL2 - Yorkshire Dales - Southern & Western Areas

Start Grid Ref: SE003637


Hello everyone,
Like Peter I’ve been umming and ahhing as to which walk to do. We have the bonus of what promises to be quite a good day weather wise.
I looked at going along the edge of the moor from Embsay coming off above Rhylstone then on to Grassington or walking up along the river from Bolton Abbey to Grassington.
In the end I settled on a circular walk which takes in most of the attractive parts of the area around Grassington.
So better late than never,

After leaving the coach at the car park (where you'll also find the loo's) we head down the narrow walled path to the bridge over the picturesque Linton falls, a fine spot for taking some pictures.
We take to the tarmac briefly before crossing the fields to Threshfield, passing its attractive hostelry before returning to the fields. Finding ourselves on Skirethorns Lane we follow it round to take the track through Wood Nook Caravan Park.
Our path climbs slowly but steadily as we pass through the woodlands and Height House then on to Height Laithe.
We then head along the bridleway in a northerly direction taking us toward Kilnsey, but just before Kilnsey we take the path downhill through Bow Bridge farm on to the B6160.
We leave the B6160 almost immediately to cross the River Wharfe via Conistone Bridge into Conistone village, where we'll seek out the start of Conistone Dib. (Formerly a very narrow stream bed carved deeply through the limestone)
The 'Dib' leads us uphill steadily until with a short scramble out at the top puts us on the 'Dales Way' (A very enjoyable 75 mile walk from Ilkley to Windermere, best done in the springtime). Having alighted on the 'Way' we follow its course south heading toward Grassington, however, we branch off downhill to enter the confines of Bastow wood. (Anyone who wishes can follow the 'Way straight back into the upper reaches of Grassington)
In Bastow wood we'll follow some of the numerous paths which wind their way downhill to deposit us on the bank of the River Wharfe.
We'll follow the river passing alongside Ghaistrill's Strid (look out for freshwater crayfish along here) to the road bridge into Grassington. A short walk brings us to the village itself, and the coach.

Today's walk is longish, but fairly easy, with only one main ascent.(146m/480ft) up the Dib. Although there are other ascents over the day, they are considerably easier.
So we’ll see you tomorrow
Don't forget the AGM Monday 7:30 at the Fleetwood Cricket Club, Broadwater.
  • When the walks for the forthcoming year are decided.
  • Where we'll have our Christmas meal will be decided.
  • Plus any other topics related to the running of the club.
Regards,
  John & Linda

06/03/2015 - BRAITHWAITE

A Group Walk for the 23rd August 2015

BRAITHWAITE

Leader - John Adams

Distance 10.3 miles/16.5 km

Ascent (total) 3658 ft/ 1115m

Time 7-7.5 Hours

Sunset time 20:24

Map OL4 The English Lakes -North Western Area

Start Grid Ref: NY236236


Hello everyone,
Like Peter I’ve been following the forecasts carefully. It now seems likely that we may get the main part of the day dry as the rain is shoved away to the northwest. So it’ll be windy instead!! See the forecast at the bottom.
Fingers crossed that the dry spell lasts long enough to complete our days walking. The walk I’ve planned does have some escape routes if the weather decides to play silly beggars.

After leaving the coach at the lay-by, we’ll walk into Braithwaite where you’ll find the loos available.
Suitably sorted we’ll carry on through the village following the road up the hill until we reach the car parking area on the left. Our path is situated at the right hand corner, this will take us up towards the forestry where we’ll find the track we’re looking for.
We’ll follow various forest roads/tracks around the hillside (via Hospital plantation) these will deposit us at the start of a very obscure path. Although not shown on the map the path will take us via Black Crag & Hobcarton End onto the summit of Grisedale Pike (2595 ft/791m) the second highest point of the day.
Leaving Grizedale Pike we head down into Coledale Hause before we then commence the second main ascent of the day as we take the path up & round to the summit of Crag Hill (2752 ft/839m the highest point in today’s walk)
With the main of the climbing for today now behind us we descend via the Scar to the summit of Sail (2536 ft/773m). Still continuing the downhill trend we pass the hause below Scar Crags round towards Outerside.
Our path back down to Braithwaite is now clear to see as we cross Barrow Door then High Coledale to find ourselves back in the village where we started the day.
Today’s walk is strenuous, with two main ascents. (473m/1550ft & 245m/800ft) The descent of 747m/2450ft is continuous over 6km/3.75miles from the summit of Crag Hill into Braithwaite.
So we’ll see you on Sunday
Regards,
  John & Linda

We hope to see you at the AGM on Monday September 7th Fleetwood Cricket club 7:30pm

Your chance to help choose next years walks! Bring your suggestions along.
09/08/2015 - BORROWDALE

A Group High Walk for the 9th August 2015

BORROWDALE via M6

Leader - John Adams

Distance 10.2 miles/16.3 km

Ascent (total) 3160 ft/ 965m

Time 6-7 Hours

Sunset time 20:54

Map OL4 The English Lakes -North Western Area

Start Grid Ref: NY245137


Hello everyone,
As seems now to be the norm for our Sundays, it looks like yet another poor day’s weather in prospect. Of course today is a brilliant day!
So what to do when we keep getting mucked about?
I’ve put a walk together (high level wouldn’t you know) which may need drastically changing upon arrival at Borrowdale/Seatoller.
So with that in mind here’s said offering below ...


We start the day at the lane leading into Seathwaite, after we’ve walked almost a mile we leave the lane at Seathwaite bridge to follow the stream.
As we draw opposite Seathwaite we take the ‘very steep’ path up alongside Sour Milk Gill. An ascent of 245m/800ft!
We have a brief lull in our ascent as we traverse along Gillercombe valley floor. At it’s end we climb around the end of Base Brown (Wainwright ranked 115) to Blackmoor Pols a further 200m/650ft.
From here we should be able to see our high point of the day ’Great Gable’ 899m/2949ft (Wainwright ranked 7)
But first we have to ascend onto Green Gable (Wainwright ranked 37) yet another 200m/650ft before we cross Windy Gap to tackle that last bit.
The final ascent 150m/500ft to Gables summit is scrappy, bits of scrambling in parts and lots of rocks everywhere!
After we’ve read the summit plaque we’ll focus our minds on the next task, getting down! We’ll go off south east to Sty Head.
After descending from the summit of Gable we make for Sprinkling Tarn and another rarely visited summit, Seathwaite Fell (632m/2073ft) (Wainwright ranked 130)
We continue by returning past Sprinkling Tarn again then downhill to Styhead Tarn.
From the tarn we follow the course of Styhead Gill passing the amazing Taylorgill Force waterfall on our steep descent toward the valley floor far below.
On reaching the valley floor all that remains is to walk back along the FLAT valley bottom to Seatoller where the coach is waiting.
The walk today is shortish but arduous, with a STEEP ascent up Sour Milk Gill then off to Great Gable! Not forgetting the STEEP descent past Taylor Gill Force
It’s quite a few years since we last visited Gables summit, and if we do go for it, it’s likely to be pretty dismal, although that said would you want to slog uphill with the sun toasting you all the way?? We’ll see you brave souls who are venturing out on Sunday.
Regards
  John & Linda
26/07/2015 - OGWEN

A Group High Level Walk for the 26th July 2015

OGWEN

Leader - John Adams

Distance 5.5 miles/9 km

Ascent (total) 3182 ft/ 970m

Time 6.5-7 Hours

Sunset time 21:19

Map OL17 Snowdonia & Conway Valley Areas

Start Grid Ref: SH664603


The walk commences from just below Tryfan on the shore of Llyn Ogwen (305m/1000ft) on the A5. We take the path over the wall which places us at the start of the severe ascent to the summit of Tryfan (915m/3002ft) a climb of 2000 ft! Lots of scrambling to had on the way up too! Having rested a little while to recover our breath.
Perhaps those of you who fancy; having a go of jumping between Adam & Eve rock pillars before we descend, to Bwlch Tryfan 185m/607 ft below. Again we ascend, this time 264m/866 ft to the summit of Glyder Fach (994 m/3261ft) and the ‘Castle in the Winds’ You’ll be pleased to know that the next part of the walk is fairly easy?
We head for the highest point of the day (999m/3277ft) the summit of Glyder Fawr, visiting the huge ‘Tilt Stone’ on the way. Next comes the 289m/948ft descent to Llyn y Cwm, from here we descend the ‘Devils Kitchen’ a further 311m/1020ft knee numbing descent!! We’ll finish off with a look in the YHA to see if there’s any teas available and then back along Llyn Ogwen on the A5 to the coach.
The walk today is short but severe, with a difficult ascent up Tryfan then off to the Glyders! Not forgetting the descent through the Devils Kitchen.

A Group Low Level Walk for the 26th July 2015

OGWEN to Betws-y-Coed

Leader - John Adams

Distance 11.5 miles/18 km

Ascent (total) 1400 ft/ 425m

Time 6 Hours

Sunset time 21:19

Map OL17 Snowdonia & Conway Valley Areas

Start Grid Ref: SH691602


The walk commences on the A5 before we arrive at Llyn Ogwen. On leaving the coach we take the footpath which heads uphill towards the Llyn Colwlyd Reservoir. When get to the top of the rise we leave the path behind us as we make for the gap between the crags of Craig Wen & Moel Ddefaid. N.B. no path here, but easy nonetheless. (We then have to descend very carefully across a very steep bit of ground) We carefully pick our way across to the track & path above Llyn Crafnant Reservoir which we descend to via ‘Hendre’ then we walk along its shoreline to the far end. Walking around the back of Mynydd Deutyn hill we once again walk along another Llyn ( this one is called Llyn Geirionydd) to the path below the dam at Tan y llyn & then the lane. From the lane we turn off through the woods heading for Llanrhychwyn after which we follow various forestry trails passing Llyn Parc As we make for our destination of Betws y Coed, where we’ll hopefully find the coach at the Station parking area
The walk today is not too strenuous but there is a stretch of the walk not on any paths (about 1.2 miles) over a Col and steeply down to join the next path along the route.
We’ll see you in the morning at Four Lane Ends 08:00
Regards
  John & Linda
12/07/2015 - CHURCH STRETTON

Alternative WALK for the 12th July 2015

CHURCH STRETTON

Leader - Les Holt

Distance 8 miles/12.8 km

Ascent (total) 2005 ft/ 611m

Time 5 Hours

Sunset time 21:37

Map Explorer 217 The Long Mynd

Start Grid Ref: SO455935


Starting in the town we head northwest through the Carding Mill Valley which becomes Motts Road then joins 'The Portway', an ancient track that runs the length of The Long Mynd. Changing direction at this point southwesterly we reach Pole Bank which at 516m is the high point of the walk.
For 2km we continue along the Portway/Jack Myton Way until reaching the track that heads southeasterly over Yapsel Bank to Minton. The return to Church Stretton involves passing through Little Stretton and the woods beside the B5477. The approximate length is 14km (8 miles) but there are options to add or subtract a little.
28/06/2015 - LANGHOLME

A Group WALK for the 28th June 2015

LANGHOLME

Leader - John Adams

Distance 12.5 miles/20.4 km

Ascent (total) 2005 ft/ 611m

Time 6 Hours

Sunset time 21:45

Maps Explorer 323 & 324 - Eskdale & Castle O’er Forest - Liddesdale & Kershope Forest

Start Grid Ref: NY389763


Hello everyone,
Well as usual we are being toyed with by the weather! A great day forecast for Saturday, and as usual a fairly dismal outlook for Sunday. Although I am a little early with my posting, I’m still weather watching, as I’m sure Peter will be too! So it’s with fingers crossed I’m repeating the walk from 3 years ago, this gives me the opportunity to shorten it in the event of the weather turning nasty. So for those of you don’t remember it, or have not been to Langholm before, read on!
The walk today commences at Canonbie.
On leaving the coach the day starts off with the leisurely walk along the River Esk after first passing through Canonbie. Once past the sawmill we leave the riverside to follow Byre Burn past the delightfully named ‘Fairy Loup waterfall’ until we reach a lane.

We follow the tarmac to Clayburn and the B6318 until the track to Outer Woodhead, this meandering track wanders past Orchard, The Hill to Howgillcleugh when it becomes a path into the Taras Water valley . (the same valley Peters walk is traversing)

We cross a surprising suspension bridge over Taras Water, then make our way to the quiet lane slightly above the Burn. We follow the lane, soon to become track past Cronksbank & Peterburn to Middlemoss, just after Middlemoss we take to a path around the hill into the small valley where three streams come together.

We now have an ascent of 100m/330ft to yet another lane, this takes us to the rather strange ’Hugh MacDiarmid’ memorial’ About a local man named Christopher Grieve, MacDiarmid was his pen name, and he is considered to be one of Scotland's most important 20th century poets!

The final ascent today (80m/265ft) brings to yet another memorial, the Malcolm memorial Obelisk.

The final leg of the day returns us to that lane before we descend alongside the wall to Far Whitsheils Cleuch plantation. We locate the forestry track out of the trees to Ewes Water, the track brings us to the A7 where we cross to the other side. A short stroll brings us to another bridge back over Ewes Water into the car park to find the coach and toilets!

Today’s walk is fairly strenuous, we have two main climbs today. The first around 330ft/100m up to the lane below Whita Hill. The second ascent is 265ft/80m up to the summit of Whita Hill. We do however have a nice easy start and the finish is not too bad either!
Sadly not a very good turnout this time, usual reasons presumably; holidays etc.
See you Sunday,
Regards
  John & Linda
14/06/2015 - BUTTERMERE

A Group WALK for the 14th June 2015

BUTTERMERE

Leader - John Adams

Distance 7.5 miles/11.5 km

Ascent (total) 2690 ft/ 820m

Time 6 Hours

Sunset time 21:42

Map OL4 - The English Lakes - North Western Area

Start Grid Ref: NY174169


Hello everyone,
DON’T FORGET, FOUR LANE ENDS 08:00 EVERYBODY!
Well, like Peter I too have been watching the forecasts closely! The promised rain seems to be taking itself away to the south (hopefully)
We may start the day with some low cloud but it’s supposed to lift as the day goes on. So with that in mind I’ve planned the following walk, fingers crossed they’ve got it right!!

The walk commences from Buttermere village.
We set off along the south-eastern shore of Buttermere to the path leading up into Scarth gap.
Unlike Peter’s group going south east, we turn north west.
Firstly to Seat (561m/1840ft) where we’ll have a brief pause before tackling the next ascent onto High Crag (741m/2431ft) this is a very steep section!
Having arrived at High Crag we have put the major climbs behind us, so we follow the path along the ridge heading to High Stile (807m/2648ft).
Ahead of us now is the final summit, namely Red Pike 751m/2464ft).
We now have a choice as to the route we descend.
To descend to the lakeside via Dodd and Bleaberry Tarn or continue out to Scale Force waterfall then return via the lakeside to Buttermere (adds a further 2km/1.25miles) but with a much gentler descent!

Today's walk is both easy and strenuous, with an easy lakeside start and finish.
However, the ascent up to High Crag is severe.
The ridge walk gives amazing views across the lakes!

Its some years since we went up on to this ridge, the views to be had are amazing, both down Buttermere and very much further afield.
The ascent is pretty tough but once behind you the rest of the walk is well worth the effort. So we’ll see you tomorrow.
Regards
  John & Linda
31/05/2015 - MOLD

A Group WALK for the 31st May 2015

MOLD (Loggerheads)

Leader - John Adams

Distance 12 miles/19 km

Ascent (total) 2430ft/742m

Time 6.5 Hours

Sunset time 21:29

Map Explorer 265 Clwydian Range

Start Grid Ref: SJ199626


Hello everyone,
As you know this is a new area for the Wyre Ramblers group. Just watched the BBC & Local forecasts, and as you would expect its looking a bit inclement!! Perhaps the weather will prove them wrong; their record for accuracy is questionable at best. My offering is somewhat similar to Peters well planned route, albeit a little extended. The majority of the route is along the Clwydian Way so hopefully should be well signposted. Sadly we have quite a low turnout, only 26 booked on. It may be due to the misconception that this will take a long time on the coach. It has to be pointed out that it is little different than the trip time to Buttermere, probably less due to the fact most all of the drive is on motorways.
The walk starts from the Loggerheads Country Park, we’ll exit the park left on to the A494 ascending slightly to find our first footpath (on part of the Clwydian Way). We follow the ‘way’ to below Maeshafn where we branch off into the Big Covert woodland, which brings us to the top of a quiet lane. We follow this lane all the way down to the valley bottom back to the A494. Now begins the first ascent of the day, having crossed the A494 Nr Iwerddon we climb steadily via numerous fields until we arrive at the site of the hill fort of Foel Fenlii (511m/1676ft) The next part of the route is fairly steeply downhill to the lane at Bwlch Penbarra, sadly we have now to regain that lost height as we trudge uphill again to the highest point today (9554m/1818ft) Moel Famau. Well of course its downhill from here, again following the Clwydian way into the little hamlet of Cilcain (a quick one in the White Horse Hotel perhaps?) We leave Cilcain down towards the Nant Gain stream, and then follow it downstream to where it joins the river Alun. Having crossed over to the opposite side of the river Alun, we stay with the Clwydian way along the valley side all the way back Loggerheads our starting point of earlier today.
Today’s walk is moderate, and should present no serious difficulties. Some parts of the route may be muddy especially in the woodland.
So there you are two walks to choose from, plenty of seats yet to be taken. For those of you booked we’ll see you Sunday Regards
  John & Linda
17/05/2015 - KESWICK

A Group WALK for the 17th May 2015

KESWICK

Leader - John Adams

Distance 13.7 miles/22 km

Ascent (total) 300 ft/ 100m

Time 6.5 Hours

Sunset time 21:06

Map OL5 - The English Lakes - North Eastern Area

Start Grid Ref: NY579127


Hello everyone,
A special thank you to Janet for taking over the booking etc for us, whilst we jetted off to foreign climes.
Thanks Janet
Well, my original plan for this Sunday was to go off and tackle Sharp Edge etc, this was of course based on the assumption that the weather had ceased playing silly buggers!
And of course wouldn’t you know it; we have what promises to be a wet one. Sharp Edge, wet; with a strong westerly? I don’t think so!!
So based on the miserable forecast, I’ve decided to traverse the Lowther valley from Shap to the Reghed centre instead of trudging around the fells.
As my walks go this is a real easy walk! But it is a long one.
No doubt for the purists amongst you this is not a day fell walking, but it is a very enjoyable route none the less.
Also in the past it has to be said that we have walked in sunshine whilst Keswick etc has enjoyed the rain!!
The walk starts from the motorway junction for Shap ( J39 )
Leaving the coach we cross the motorway bridge then left on to the little lane , we take the path near the top of the rise to cross over a couple of fields.
Re-crossing the M6, we descend across the fields into the Village of Shap.
We now follow the main road (A6) to the far end of Shap village, (passing the public loo’s on the way).
From the end of the Village we head towards the Hamlet of Rosgill, leaving Rosgill we now follow the River Lowther to cross over at Bampton Grange. (Usually we lunch here next to the church wall).
After lunch we continue on the West side of the River until we arrive at a footbridge, once more we re-cross the River taking the lane to pass through Whale.
We now have a pleasant stroll along to the Village of Askham (where we take our last look at the River Lowther).
There was a lovely local pub here, but sadly last time we visited it was closed. So like our previous visit we will take our cuppa on the local green.
Now it’s onto the last leg of the walk, as we make our way via path and road toward the Villages of Tirril & Sockbridge.
From Sockbridge we cross the River Eamont then follow the path westwards to the main road (A592), then we turn north to arrive at the RHEGED centre.
We mustn’t get too comfortable here because we’ll need to walk up to the lay-by on the other side of the A66 to catch our ride home.

Although this is a long walk it has virtually no ascents and is a lovely walk along the Lowther Valley.
So perhaps the weather will be kinder to us on our next trip to Mold (I’ve not been there before, must get a map!)
See you Sunday,
Regards
  John & Linda
19/04/2015 - LANGDALES

A Group WALK for the 19th April 2015

LANGDALES

Leader - John Adams

Distance 8 miles/12 km

Ascent (total) 3110 ft/ 950m

Time 6 Hours

Sunset time 20:20

Map OL6 - The English Lakes - South Western Area

Start Grid Ref: NY294063


Hello everyone,
Looks like yet another dry day in prospect! I wonder how long it will last.
We have a really excellent turnout this Sunday, currently standing at 51 booked on! Good job we’ve got a 53 seater.
Due to the coach being so well subscribed, could we ask you to place your rucsacs in the hold please, unless you’re happy sit with it on your knee of course?
So what delights have we got for you this time?
The walk commences at New Dungeon Ghyll car park. We start the day climbing, as we ascend the steep path alongside Stickle Ghyll up to Stickle Tarn. Once you have got your breath back, we’ll walk anti-clockwise round Stickle Tarn until we reach the path which takes us to the foot of ‘Jacks Rake’ Having negotiated the easy scramble of Jacks Rake up to the summit of Pavey Ark (700m/2297 ft) we’ll have a wander across to the next summit of Harrison Stickle ( 736m/2415 ft) the highest of the Pikes. From Harrison we’ll be able to see our next objective, Loft Crag (a mere 670m/2198 ft) way below us. Having stood on Loft Crag we turn our attention to the distinctive outline of ‘Pike O Stickle’ which has a nice little bit of hands on to reach it’s summit ( 709m/2326 ft). Well that’s all of the Pikes collected, so we’ll set off to Thunacar Knott then on to High Raise. Partly retracing our steps we make for the distinctive shape of Sergeant Man. Leaving Sergeant Man we cross over Blea Rigg, (off to the right you can see Stickle Tarn from earlier in the day.) Now, to try a different route down! Leaving Blea Rigg we cross over to the top of Whitegill Crag. There dropping away near the summit is our way down, the narrow confines of Whitegill ravine, previously only ever ascended, today we’ll enjoy?? descending it. All 300m/985ft! Having negotiated our down the ravine we then make our way to the bar at the Dungeon Ghyll then the coach.
Today’s walk is strenuous, we have to ascend (260m/855ft) with no footpath to guide us for a distance of 3 km/ 1.9 miles.
A path is shown on the map after this point to the summit but I don’t recall there being one at all!
The descent (415m/1362ft over 3km/1.9miles) at the far end of the ridge is STEEP & slippery, so caution is needed.
The latter stages of the walk into Kirkby Lonsdale are easy.
At first glance the shortness of the walk may give you the idea that today’s venture will be an easy one!
So be warned there’s ascent and lots of it, seven tops in all!
Oh and don’t forget the scramble down the ravine, just to round off a perfect day!
Regards
  John & Linda
05/04/2015 - KIRKBY LONSDALE

A Group WALK for the 5th April 2015

KIRKBY LONSDALE VIA SEDBERGH

Leader - John Adams

Distance 12.4 miles/19.9 km

Ascent (total) 2385 ft/ 727m

Main Ascent 1660 ft/ 506m

Time 7 Hours

Sunset time 19:54

Map OL2 - Yorkshire Dales - Western Areas and OL19 - Howgill Fells

Start Grid Ref: SD647917


Hello everyone,
Could we be so fortunate as to have yet another dry day? Seems too good to be true!
Poor Fylde got a rubbish day last Sunday, the weather must have been awful!
So fingers crossed, we’ll tramp off up to the high spots above the Lune valley, hopefully the views round about should make the effort worthwhile.
We last completed this walk in October 2011, so perhaps there will be one or two of you who not know this part of the world.
Here’s what you can look forward to???
We take our leave of the coach at the junction of the A684 & the A683 on the outskirts of Sedbergh.
We take the path immediately at the junction crossing two fields to ‘Birks’ on the River Rawthey.
The footbridge takes us over the Rawthey then along its bank a short distance to Abbotts Holme Bridge over the River Dee.
After a very short distance on tarmac, we leave the comfort of any footpath for a while; as we start to climb steadily looking for the wall which will act as our guide all the way to Calf Top (609m/1998 ft).
Hopefully weather permitting, we should have some great views down into Dent village as well as the narrow valley of Barbondale far below us; not forgetting the wide Lune valley and beyond.
From the highest point of the day we now have a long descent ahead of us, and some of it is steep!
Our descent will bring us to the pretty village of Barbon, the final stages of the walk will pass over fields through Underfell, Whelprig, Fell Garth, to Hole House.
At Hole House we turn to the right to join Wandales lane, taking the 3rd right brings us into the tiny hamlet of Bees Nest.
We pass through Bees Nest to the A683 which we leave almost immediately on to Laitha lane.
We then walk along Laitha lane passing through the caravan park which brings us directly to where the coach is parked near Devil’s Bridge.
Today’s walk is strenuous, we have to ascend (260m/855ft) with no footpath to guide us for a distance of 3 km/ 1.9 miles.
A path is shown on the map after this point to the summit but I don’t recall there being one at all!
The descent (415m/1362ft over 3km/1.9miles) at the far end of the ridge is STEEP & slippery, so caution is needed.
The latter stages of the walk into Kirkby Lonsdale are easy.
We have a good turnout yet again this weekend with 43 booked on; however that can change either way.
So we’ll see you on Sunday.
Regards
  John & Linda
22/02/2015 - DUFTON

A Group WALK for the 22nd March 2015

DUFTON VIA APPLEBY

Leader - John Adams

Distance 12.7 miles/20.4 km

Ascent (total) 2000 ft/ 610m

Main Ascent 1710 ft/ 520m

Time 6.5 Hours

Sunset time 18:28

Map OL19 The Howgill Fells & Upper Eden Valley

Start Grid Ref: NY689250


Hello everyone,
Did any of you manage to see the eclipse? Linda and I were very fortunate in that there was a thinning of the clouds, sufficient to allow us to see it in the last few minutes up to and just past maximum shadow.
So off to Dufton again, will we have a dry one? It looks like we may be lucky!
I’m doing a very similar route as last year, but with a different finish.

The walk commences in Dufton. After visiting the loos we walk round the corner to find the track which is the start of our day. We start up the track passing Pusgill House on our long 1700ft/520m ascent to the hills above us. Having passed Dufton Pike and the old mine on our way up, we finally arrive at the edge of Great Rundale Tarn perched high on the fells.
Looking slightly off to the right we’ll spot the trig point (692m/2270ft) above Blackstone Edge. Because the ground may be boggy we’ll keep along the top of the ‘Edge’ until we reach the mouth of High Cup Nick. Now; unlike on our previous visits, we’ll descend into the bottom of the valley and walk down its length alongside High Cupgill Beck.
We’ll exit the valley via Harbour Flatt farm, then we cross the lane onto the path opposite towards Brackenthwaite. Leaving Brackenthwaite we pass through the southern end of Flakebridge wood then along another track until we reach the start of the tarmac. Taking the path off to the left we cross two fields and cross Frith beck through ‘Stank wood’ to join ‘Stank lane’ (sets the imagination going those names do!) Stank lane brings us to a very quiet lane taking us under the busy A66, then down into Appleby.
After having satisfied our thirsts we’ll have a short walk up the B6542 for about 1km. When we arrive at the bridge under the A66 we’ll wait there for the coach on its return journey.
Today’s walk has a long ascent, 1700 ft/520m of it, over a distance of (6km/3.75miles) We’ll be off any real paths (faint path here) for approx 5km/3miles above Blackstone Edge. The descent is steep on from the top of the Nick, however we have an easy finish over the final 7km/4.4miles Today’s walk is moderate/hard.
Strangely, although Dufton seems to generate a lot of interest we’ve only got 37 people booked on!!
See you Sunday!
Regards
  John & Linda
08/03/2015 - CONISTON

A Group WALK for the 8th March 2015

CONISTON VIA TORVER

Leader - John Adams

Distance 8 miles/12.6 km

Ascent (total) 2923 ft/891m

Time 5.5 Hours

Sunset time 18:02

Map Explorer OL6 The English Lakes - South Western Area

Start Grid Ref: SD284942


Hello everyone
Will we get a dry day? Well possibly half of it anyway!
Looking at the mountain weather forecast below, perhaps!

The walk commences at Torver itself, from the village we set off across Low Torver Park then High Torver Park to find ourselves overlooking the boggy expanse of Bull Haw Moss.
At about the 800 ft/240m level on the other side of the moss, we leave the comfort of the well worn path in a South Easterly direction under the lee of High Pike Haw, from here we ascend the flank of White Maiden (at 1995 ft/608m) the first of today's summits.
We now have a lovely stroll along Walna Scar to begin our next ascent (only 260ft/80m) to the summit of Brown Pike. Then it’s up again (275 ft/84m) this time to Buck Pike summit (at 2441 ft/744m) the last summit along this ridge is of course Dow Crag a mere 125 ft/38m ascent to the top (at 2553ft/778 m). Descending for (425 ft/130m) we cross Goat Hause to begin the ascent (360 ft/109m) to the Old Man summit the highest point of the day. (at 2635 ft/803m)

Leaving the summit in a south-easterly direction we work our way down the side of the fell to reach the large quarry workings. We leave the quarry via the track down to the Walna Scar road, however we quickly desert the rough road and take the faint path down to the wall. Crossing the wall we follow the field walls heading towards Heathwaite farm, from here we take the tarmac track downhill all the way into Coniston!
This is a moderate/hard walk, with only one main ascent, although we do have a fine ridge walk round towards the Old Man.
So there you have it, fingers crossed.
I did have planned an11mile 3900 ft walk but Linda persuaded me to save it for another time!
We have 49 booked on, and so I have asked for a 53 seater just in case we have someone coming along last minute.
So we’ll see you Sunday
Regards
  John & Linda
22/03/2015 - HORTON-IN-RIBBLESDALE

A Group WALK for the 22nd February 2015

HORTON-IN-RIBBLESDALE

Leader - John Adams

Distance 9.3 miles / 15 km

Ascent (total) 1621 ft / 495 m

Time 5.5 Hours

Sunset time 17:32

Maps OL41 - Forest of Bowland - Eastern Area
OL2 - Yorkshire Dales - Southern & Western Areas

Start Grid Ref: SD808647


Hello everyone
As Peter has mentioned I’ve been watching the forecasts very closely this last few days. This will explain my very late posting of the walk.
As most all of you are by now aware forecast for tomorrow is pretty (?) dire, do I detect a trend here!
I originally planned to go over Whernside, needless to say that’s shelved for another day.
So taking into account the prevailing weather conditions I’ve decided on a moderately easy walk staying quite low level, and not too long.
I’ll need to coach to go to Horton via Settle to drop us at the start of our walk.
We will hopefully have the worst of the weather at our backs for most of the day, apart from the last 4km/2.5 miles, which is downhill anyway.

We start today on the B6480 near Giggleswick. Leaving the coach we immediately commence the day with an ascent of around 100m/330ft to above the quarry.
At the top we leave the path we’re to cross over to another path away to the right slightly below us.
Having acquired the path from above we follow it all the way into Feizor, where we turn uphill (60m/197ft) following the track past Feizor woods.
Once we’re over we make our way toward the little hamlet of Wharfe where we seek out the walled track leading to Crummack.
On passing over Austwick Beck clapper bridge yet again we start to climb, at Crummack we turn off to the left still ascending until we meet another track.
Finally the route levels off as we look out for the point where we join Sulber Nick just beyond Thieves Moss.
This final part of the day sees us following the course of the Nick to above Horton.
All that then remains is to take the path down to the road, and then into the village where the coach will be parked.
I dare say the local hostelry will be waiting for our custom.
Today's walk is moderate with two main ascents, (140m/460ft)~(200m/656ft)
So bring along a change of footwear/socks, for those holes which your boot is mysteriously drawn into, and perhaps if you have them ski goggles (in case of snow blizzard conditions).
See you tomorrow
Regards,
  John & Linda
08/02/2015 - CARTMEL

A Group WALK for the 8th February 2015

CARTMEL

Leader - John Adams

Distance 13 miles / 21 km

Ascent (total) 2297 ft / 680 m

Time 7.0 Hours

Sunset time 17:08

Map Outdoor Leisure OL7 - The English Lakes - South Eastern Area

Start Grid Ref: SD472852


Hello everyone,
I wonder if this lovely weather will hold until Sunday? Not likely is it!
So because the walks have been very quickly done the last few times out, I've decided on a little bit longer walk for Sunday.
I think I've managed to locate a parking spot in Cartmel, its in front of Cartmel Priory School, they're like hens teeth in the village. (Hope the driver has got his satnav)
The best way into Cartmel would be via Grange and Flookburgh on the B5277 then to Cartmel from Cark.

We start today at the bus stop on the A590 near Sampool Bridge, from here we cross over the busy dual carriageway to take the footpath opposite.
We soon leave the roar of the traffic behind as we head toward the imposing southern end of Whitbarrow below White Scar.
We walk around the foot of the fell (east) to Rawsons, from here we start our first ascent of the day.
We follow the footpath in northerly direction through extensive woodlands until we meet a footpath crossing the one we’re on, we take the path off to the left going up hill. (Naturally!)
As we clear the woodland we’ll see the summit off to the left (Lord Seat 215m/705ft) hopefully we’ll have great views from the top.
Now comes the descent, which is a little on the steep side down to Witherslack Hall school grounds.
After crossing the grounds to a lane, we return to the woods heading for Witherslack village, but not quite reaching it as we turn away near the church into the fields.
We cross over another lane then into more woods to arrive at a single track lane which will deliver us to Nichols wood at its far end.
On emerging from the woods we’re confronted by a footbridge over the river Winster which puts us in the fields opposite.
We negotiate our way on to a track which leads us on to ‘back o th fell road’ and the foot of the next ascent today.
We follow the path/track uphill to the summit Tower (174m/571ft) again good views will be had from here?
So downhill again and back to the busy A590 which have to cross once more.
We take the lane the narrow lane uphill (again!) until the footpath which will bring us to the summit of Hampsfell (today's highest point 220m722ft) and the oddly named ‘Hospice’ lookout tower.
We'll have good views over Cartmel below us and the fells beyond, hopefully!
So another steepish descent then an easy stroll into Cartmel.
Our coach should be waiting for us in front of the big school near headless cross (SD 781384).

Today's walk is moderate with three main ascents, (210m/689ft) -- (179m/558ft) -- (127m/417ft)
So we'll see you Sunday
We’ll have the new membership cards with us if you wish to renew for 2015.
Regards,
  John & Linda
25/01/2015 - ARNSIDE

A Group WALK for the 25th January 2015

ARNSIDE

Leader - John Adams

Distance 9.3 miles / 15 km

Ascent (total) 886 ft/ 270 m

Time 5.0 Hours

Sunset time 16:40

Map Outdoor Leisure OL 7 - The English Lakes - Southern Eastern Area

Start Grid Ref: SD508720


Hello everyone, Well here we are returned from our skiing holiday, seems like we missed a bit of a damp day on the 11th! I was planning on going over Farleton fell but it appears that the Fylde went that way on the 18th. So I've decided on a coastal theme for my walk, this makes for an easy days walking, apart from the two ascents of course. The weather could go either way on the day with a south-westerly airflow, warmer but usually wetter!
We start out from the A6 roundabout from J35 off the M6, opposite Pine lakes entrance. We cross the fields (real mucky here!) toward the village of Warton passing under the main west coast railway. As we near the houses we turn left to enter the village on Back lane, we make a couple of turns in the village to find a small car park on Crag lane. At the rear of the car park we’ll follow a permissive path which winds its way upwards, ultimately; arriving at the summit of Warton Crag (535ft/163m) today’s highest point. Having enjoyed the extensive views we follow the path away from the summit through the woodlands bringing us to a track called Occupation rd. We turn left along the track but after only a couple of hundred metres we leave it along an obscure path past a place called the Belt. Our route slowly works its way downhill to reach Crag Foot at the mouth of the Leighton Moss nature reserve. The route takes us across the Moss and the railway line to begin our second climb of the day over Heald Brow then down into Silverdale Green. Passing through the village, we look for the footpath which takes us out to Red Rake and its cave on the seashore. Returning to the road we cross the edge of the caravan park to Far Arnside, this leads us on to the coastal path. This final leg of the walk takes around the headland to New Barnes, then an easy stroll into Arnside. Our coach will be waiting for us near the end of the seafront.
Today's walk is an easy one with two main ascents, (150m/500ft)--(60m/197ft)
See you Sunday
Regards,
  John & Linda

2014

14/12/2014 - FORTON

A Group WALK for the 14th December 2014

LANCASTER to FORTON

Leader - John Adams

Distance 11.6 miles / 18.6 km

Ascent 330ft / 100 m (total)

Time 5 Hours - Sunset time 15:52

Map - OL41 Forest of Bowland West sheet

Start Grid Ref: SD493641


Hello everyone
Well we come to the end of yet another year, one which started wet (weeks of em!) and sadly it looks like we’ll finish on the same note. This Sunday I've decided to give Ambleside and its treasures a miss, we've traversed all of the available paths & byways numerous times. So for a complete change I'm going to do a walk along the Lancaster canal back to the New Holly. Well best have a look at it, see what you think!
We start the day on the outskirts of Lancaster, at the Holiday Inn bus stop on the A683 Caton Rd. We pass the side of the Hotel arriving at the ‘Millennium Way’ (formerly the old railway to Glasson) Turning left we walk alongside the river Lune on the ‘Way’ back into Lancaster city centre.
We quickly depart the centre via Moor Lane up to the Lancaster canal, this will be our guide for the next 13.5km / 8.5miles as we walk along the towpath. Although the walk is a long one for this time of year it presents no difficulties apart from muddy towpaths.
When we reach the No75 canal bridge of Ratcliffe Wharf Lane we depart the towpath, taking to the tarmac. This final leg of today's walk is only 1.1km/0.7mile along the quiet lane to the A6, once across the A6 we arrive at the New Holly. All that remains is to wait for the rest of the coach to arrive! Might have a drink while we wait, perhaps?

This walk today is easy! No ascents of note However, it’s a long one for the time of year.
Linda & I would like to extend our very best wishes to you all for the forthcoming festivities. We look forward to meeting you all next year to enjoy even more adventures on them thar hills.
Regards,
John & Linda

Merry Christmas & a Happy New Year

30/11/2014 - HAWKSHEAD

A Group WALK for the 30th November 2014

Hawkshead via Pooley Bridge

Leader - John Adams

Distance 10.4 miles / 16.7 km

Ascent 1978ft / 603 m (total)

Time 5.5 Hours - Sunset time 15:57

Map - OL7 The English Lakes South-eastern Area

Start Grid Ref: SD373897


Hello everyone,
Well it looks like yet another dry one, we could get used to this! I would suggest we leave Hawkshead at 16:00hrs as the roads are particularly narrow back to Pooley Bridge, the driver can then make use of the last light of the day. I've decided to do battle with some of Grizedale meandering forest tracks, in the hope of arriving where we wish to be. So with that in mind this is what is intended, read on.
See you Sunday.
Regards,
John & Linda

We start the day outside the YMCA on the Hawkshead road. Right opposite the YMCA entrance is our path leading uphill for 140m/460ft! To the top of Stott Park Heights. Having passed over Stott Park we make our way to High Dam a very picturesque tarn in the Woodlands. We walk almost all the way round to the far side of the tarn on the path which leads us downhill to the hamlet of Crosslands. After Crosslands we pass St Pauls church in Rusland then over Stony Hazel and its woods to Force Forge farm & Mill. Turning right on the lane we take to a forest track (one of many to come!) which we follow up a narrow valley to pass an unnamed tarn. We join yet another track which takes us northerly along the edge of the woods with the village of Satterthwaite off to our right across the fields. You’ve probably guessed by now that we’re deep into Grizedale forest with its numerous & bewildering forest tracks. Continuing northerly along yet more tracks; we pass Grizedale (again off to the right) until we reach the junction of two tracks & Grizedale Beck. Here we depart the tracks (for a while only) as we follow the path round Guinea Hill passing yet another smaller unnamed tarn. On leaving the tarn the ground begins its long descent to Hawkshead, sure enough not long after the tarn we rejoin another forest track which takes right to the edge of Low Park Wood. The final leg today is to continue downhill passing the Vicarage into the village of Hawkshead. The coach will be found in the main car park, toilets here too!

This walk today is fairly easy! With three main ascents of note Firstly 140m/460ft, the second ascent around 150m/490ft the last 146m/480ft But will he get us lost in Grizedale?
16/11/2014 - PENDLE HILL

A Group WALK for the 16th November 2014

Pendle hill via Barley

Leader - John Adams

Distance 9.5 miles / 15 km

Ascent 1837ft / 560 m (total)

Time 5.5 Hours - Sunset time 16:13

Maps Explorer 21 South Pennines

Start Grid Ref: SD827488


Hello everyone Well, this time I’m late delivering my walk! Seems like we may have a dry day tomorrow (fingers crossed) As you’ll notice I’m NOT going on to Pendle hill this time for a change. Instead I’ve elected to do a cross country walk to Barley from Gisburn. We will be doing some ascent of course! (No surprise there then I hear you say) but not much in the way of ‘real’ ascent. We should have opportunities for some fairly good pictures of Pendle hill and its surrounding landscape. See you tomorrow then
Regards,
John & Linda
We start the day at Gisburn on the A59, meanwhile, the coach continues on its way down the A682 toward Barley. After a short stroll along the main street we leave Gisburn and head off across the fields to the corner of Coal Pit lane. (Once the old road to Gisburn from Barrowford/Colne) This is also the start of today’s first ascent (227m/745ft over 3.5km/2miles) We follow the old road to the end of the tarmac, and then continue on along the track up the hill. Our destination being Weets Hill (397m/1302ft) from here we’ll be able to see Pendle hill some 4 miles away. We return to the track where we regain the tarmac next to the radio mast. Shortly afterwards we leave the old road and follow the path down to the A682 and the Moorcock Inn (time for a quick one?) Crossing the A682 we follow the course of Admergill Water stream to Lower Admergill farm, here we commence the second of today's two ascents. (184m/604ft over 2km/1.25miles) Our ascent takes us up to up to Wheathead Height, (182m/597ft) again we’ll have Pendle Hill on view, only 2.5 miles away now! The final part of our day sees us walking downhill through three farms and passing the Outdoor Centre to arrive at the car park in Barley. Didn’t someone say that our coach would be parked round here somewhere?
This walk today is fairly easy! With two main ascents of note First over 220m/740ft, the second ascent around 180m/600ft






B Walks

2020

04/07/2021 - THE ROACHES

B WALK for 4th July 2021

The ROACHES {nr. Leek)

Leader Peter Rossall

Distance 8 miles / 13km

Ascent 1115ft / 340 m

Time 5¼ hours

Sunset Time 21:36

Maps OL24- The Peak District - The White Peak Area

Start Grid Ref SJ994604


One day I must look at doing a different route when we come to this area, but for today I’m going to repeat one that we’ve done before. It has a bit of everything – good and bad – by having some ups and downs (you’d expect nothing less), although they’re not the hardest we ever undertake, and sadly a little bit too much tarmac to be trodden although we’ll look to leave that as often as possible. That said, the weather may be our biggest obstacle this weekend as its threatening to be a little ‘interesting’ with the possibility of a bit of sunshine, warmth and maybe some lively showers ... but they may also avoid us.
We begin our walk from the car park at Tittesworth Water (Reservoir) where a Visitor Centre and public conveniences are available. Heading back to the road we turn right to make our way to “Whitty Lane” which we’ll follow to Upper Hulme where we meet the minor road that runs beneath The Roaches. We’ll ascend to Hen Cloud first before losing the height we’ve just gained to pass by the Don Whillans Hut [1] (or "Rock Hall" as it’s also known) before climbing onto the Roaches ridge a little later.
Once the ridge is attained, easy walking ensues – possibly with lots of ‘tourists’ – as we pass Doxey Pool [2] and hopefully get a glimpse (and maybe some pictures) of rock climbers scrambling up the rocks that form The Roaches. Continuing on we’ll pass the trig point (at 1656ft/505mtrs, our highest point today) before descending past the Bearstone Rock to reacquaint ourselves with the minor road we left by Hen Cloud.
All downhill from here, beginning with a stretch of road walking before taking to paths that pass by Roach Side Farm and Rose Cottage as we head back towards Tittesworth Water. As we reach Meerbrook, we’ll pass the Lazy Trout pub and, because we’re only half a mile away from where the coach is, we’ll stop here for refreshments.
[1] Over 30 years after his death, Don Whillans remains one of Britains foremost climbers and mountaineers. A contemporary of Joe Brown and Sir Chris Bonnington, the Don Whillans (memorial) hut is wonderfully set in amongst the rocks and can be hired by British Mountaineering Club (BMC) members. We'll walk by it, although to my knowledge, we're not allowed to get too close.
[2] Doxey Pool is a small pond, measuring about 15 by 10 metres (49 by 33 ft) close to the top path of The Roaches. Legend has it that this pool is inhabited by a mermaid called Jenny Greenteeth, known as the blue nymph. The legend says that she fell in the pool on a foggy day whilst walking along the top of the Roaches, and ever since has been enticing unsuspecting victims down to the pool and to their watery grave.
06/06/2021 - TEBAY

B WALK for 6th June 2021

SHAP/TEBAY [Borrowdale, but not the famous one]

Leader Peter Rossall

Distance 8 miles / 13km

Ascent 997ft / 304 m

Time 5¼ hours

Sunset Time 21:40

Maps OL7 - The English Lakes - South Eastern Area & OL19 Howgill Fells and Upper Eden Valley

Start Grid Ref NY553035


Another repeat of a previously done walk today, although unlike our walk a fortnight ago, this one was last done 9 years ago. My map indicates no actual marked path for the ridge part of our route but as I recall from our previous venture, we had no great problems in navigating along the ridge as we ‘ticked off’ the various rises in terrain. I do remember the descent from the final hill being very steep however.
We’ll leave the coach by the layby on the A6 just above Huck’s Bridge. Taking great care we’ll cross the road and walk the short distance back up the hill (using the grass verge) to follow a track snaking down to Borrow Beck and the stepping stones that will help us cross it before we commence our ascent onto the ridge above us via the Breasthigh Road bridleway, passing by the Thunder Stone which sounds terrific but is actually a little underwhelming.
This ascent is fairly constant, and pretty steep, although it lasts for just short of a mile so it is over and done with before you know it ... and as it flattens out we look for a path which is not indicated on the map but which should (hopefully) be visible on the ground. We head off in a south easterly direction over relatively easy terrain that rises and falls fairly gently as we pass over a number of ‘lumps’ along the ridge. Dennison Hill [1476ft / 450m], Whinash [1545ft / 471m], Winterscleugh [1522ft / 464m], Roundthwaite Common [1427ft / 435m], and Belt Howe [1338ft / 408].
Our route turns easterly here and our next ‘top’ is Casterfell Hill [1204 / 367m] before we reach the ridge’s end at Jeffrey’s Mount [1240ft / 378m]. From here we should be presented with super views of the Lune gorge, which as well as the river Lune also encompasses the West Coast main line railway, the M6 motorway and the A685 road before the land rises once again to offer us the wonderfully rounded Howgill Fells.
Leaving Jeffrey’s Mount due south and extremely steeply, we arrive at the A685 to cross Borrow Beck once again before using the minor road to pass under the motorway and rail-line as we head to Salterwath Bridge where we cross the Lune and turn onto the riverside path towards Tebay, before another small section of road brings us into Tebay where the Cross Keys pub awaits our patronage.
23/05/2021 - GLENRIDDING

B WALK for 23rd May 2021

GLENRIDDING

Leader Peter Rossall

Distance 9.25 miles / 15km

Ascent 1234ft / 376 m

Time 6 hours

Sunset Time 21:24

Map Explorer OL5 - The English Lakes - North Eastern Area

Start Grid Ref NY386169


Hi all,
Sorry its late, I’ve been weather watching hoping for some good news. Sadly, it’s looking like it won't match todays sunshine. Here’s what I have planned for tomorrow for the ‘B’ group.
Firstly, apologies for repeating a walk that we last did 9 months ago. That wasn’t what I had planned for this year's visit to this beautiful area, although the forecasted weather – with the possibility of rain and the probability of relatively low cloud - left me with little option other than to limit the height that we reach on any walk this weekend. This walk tops out at just under 500mtrs/1600ft and despite having been done so recently, it was enjoyed greatly last year by all those who did it so hopefully, in spite of whatever weather we get, we’ll have another enjoyable day.
Beginning from the car park in Glenridding where toilet facilities exist, we’ll head north along the A592, leaving it at the earliest opportunity to follow the lakeside path, complete with its small but plentiful ups and downs. We re-cross the road and via a good compacted footpath arrive at the car park from where lots of people begin their trek to Aira Force. We’ll follow the masses and whereas last year we chose to forego the set of steps that take you down to view the falls from below, I think the rain that has fallen recently makes it worth our while to do so this time around.
As our route follows Aira Beck upstream we’ll also view the falls from up above them (as we did last year) before continuing upwards until we depart the wooded area before turning right just before a wall to begin our short, yet relatively steep, climb to the aptly named Airy Crag, the summit of Gowbarrow Fell.
Our descent from here is clearly visible – or should be! - and relatively easy, bringing us down to the path known as ‘the Balcony route’. The path has a few ups and downs, although once again, none of those are particularly savage. What it does give us are fantastic views over Ullswater as it returns us to the Aira Force car park once again from where we’ll follow our easy return to Glenridding.
If the anticipated rain does join us for the day, at least our end of walk refreshments should be able to be enjoyed inside rather than outside like our two previous walk endings had to.
25/04/2021 - BRAITHWAITE

B WALK for 25th April 2021

BRAITHWAITE via M6

Leader Peter Rossall

Distance 8.2 miles / 13.5km

Ascent 1076ft / 328 m

Time 5 hours

Sunset Time 20:35

Map Explorer OL4 - The English Lakes - North Western Area

Start Grid Ref NY264236


Hi everybody,
great to be back and to see you all.
What’ve you been up to for the last decade? – it hasn’t been that long, it just felt like it, still, everything’s rosy in the garden now ain’t it? ...
I figured that my little band of warriors may prefer something gentle rather than strenuous for a reintroduction to the fells – and yes, I’m aware that lots of you will have actually used the time that we’ve had on our hands sensibly and maintained, or even improved, your level of fitness, so much so that when I came and reccied this walk last week, I was certainly wishing I’d done the same. My original plan involved starting and finishing in Braithwaite but that ran to 9½ miles which, for an opener, I thought was a bit too far, so I’ve reduced it slightly by finishing in Keswick instead.
Starting from where the coach will be parked up in the minor road just off the A66 by the Braithwaite turn off, we’ll head off along the minor road to Newlands Beck Bridge before taking to a footpath on the left that takes us off the road as we have more than enough tarmac to tread on this walk as it is. Our little detour is only short, but it does afford fantastic views of Skiddaw, and we’re soon reacquainted with the tarmac, and it’s the fast moving A66 which we have to cross, with great care, before taking the road into Portinscale.
Now starts a trek through Keswick’s suburbs as we take a circuitous route to meet the newly refurbished Keswick to Threlkeld Railway Trail – a trail that we’ve used many times previously, but large portions of it have been out of use since December 2015 when Storm Desmond washed great swathes of it away. An £8m restoration was finally completed and the full walk reopened last December, complete with the Bobbin Mill tunnel being brought ‘back to life’ – it was infilled with concrete 50 years ago when the rail line was closed to traffic – and it’s a splendid ‘new’ addition to the trail. Expect it to be busy with families, dog walkers, serious walkers (like us!) and cyclists.
One of the (many) problems caused by storm Desmond was that two iron railway bridges that crossed the river, and had stood in place for 150 years, were washed away. They’ve both been substituted with bright and shiny new replacements and when we reach the second new bridge we’ll be taking our leave of the trail and starting our ascent onto Latrigg.
A steep climb up a minor road brings us to the path that ascends (more gently) up the eastern ridge of Latrig and this bit may make us realise how much we’ve let ourselves go. That said, we’re not in a race and getting there’s the thing, not how quickly. As you’re ascending, have a look behind you and think yourself lucky that we’re not climbing Blencathra via Blease fell ... Summit reached and the views enjoyed, it’s all downhill from here as we make for Keswick – not 100% sure what we’ll find there in the form of establishments that we can use – but, hopefully it won’t ruin our first day out for far too long.
25/10/2020 - KESWICK

B WALK for the 25th October 2020

KESWICK

Leader Peter Rossall

Distance ~9 miles / ~14.5km

Ascent ~1180 ft / ~360 m

Sunset Time 16:49

Map Explorer OL4 - The English Lakes - North Western Area

Start Grid Ref NY264236


A 9 mile circular walk passing through Portinscale as we head up and over Catbells. Returning via the lower path along Catbells' eastern side with (hopefully) wonderful views all day long. Just in case the weather is very poor (strong winds and showers are predicted), I also have a lower level alternative in mind.
11/10/2020 - HAYFIELD

B WALK for the 11th October 2020

HAYFIELD

Leader Peter Rossall

Distance 7.75 miles / 12.5km

Ascent ~690 ft / ~210 m

Sunset Time 18:19

Map Explorer OL1 - The Peak District - Dark Peak Area

Start Grid Ref SK037868


A circular walk of 7.75 miles that is relatively gentle and easy, albeit that it begins with a stiff climb straight away onto Ollersett Moor. It may be a little boggy in parts, particularly after this weeks rain, although there are lots of very easy sections to it as well. The highlight is a rather splendid gorge that doubtless lots of you will have been to before, that said, previous visitor to it or not, its still a fascinating little spot. We'll be back in time for tea and cakes, and maybe a pint of amber nectar if we can get in any pubs. Make the most of it because, without wishing to be a doom-monger, it may just be our last opportunity this year.
Certainly hope that's not the case.
30/8/2020 - GLENRIDDING

B WALK for the 30th August 2020

GLENRIDDING

Leader Peter Rossall

Distance ~9 miles / ~15 km

Ascent ~1050 ft / ~320 m

Sunset Time 20:06

Map Explorer OL5 The English Lakes - North Eastern Area

Start Grid Ref NY384169


I've not done one of these for a while!.....
I was looking for a gentle restart (that's for me rather than you as I'm a bit out of condition) but nothing leapt of the page at me. I thought about doing the Ullswater Way from Glenridding to Pooley Bridge along the eastern side of Ullswater but, because its about 11 miles I thought better of it. I even considered doing (for a third time) the western side of this path (because its lovely) but in the end I opted for a compromise that will see us start and finish in Glenridding with an easy walk to Aira Force. (Yeah I know, we've been here a few times) but we'll then tread some new ground by following Aira Beck upstream before climbing to the summit of Gowbarrow Fell where I'm led to believe that great views are available. Down to the balcony path for more spectacular views before retracing our steps alongside Ullswater back to Glenridding. Around 9 miles in total, with a few ups and downs but, the weathers threatening to behave and, for anyone who is looking for something a little more energetic, I'm sure that some of our fellow travellers will be heading for Hell....vellyn.
2/2/2020 - CLITHEROE

B WALKs for the 2nd February 2020

Leader Les Holt


(1) BARLEY TO CLITHEROE via PENDLE HILL

Distance ~8 miles / ~13 km

Sunset Time 16:52

Map OL41 Forest of Bowland

Start Grid Ref SD821406


Starting at Barley Car Park we take the ‘Pendle Way’ to the summit of Pendle Hill up a stepped path.
This is a steep ascent of 330m. From the summit a descent is made northerly to Downham. The route to Clitheroe via Worsaw End and Worston is quite leisurely.


(2) SAWLEY TO CLITHEROE

Distance ~8 miles / ~13 km

Start Grid Ref SD776465


Beginning in Sawley where there are the remains of a Cistercian Abbey we head south to the village of Downham, a well known TV and Film location. There is an ascent of 90m. From Downham a straight forward meander back to Clitheroe via Worsaw End, Mearley Hall and Pendleton.
About 8 miles in total, but short-cuts are available for those who wish to diverge.
19/1/2020 - AMBLESIDE

B WALK for the 19th January 2020

AMBLESIDE

Leader Graham Page

Distance 8 miles / 13 km

Ascent (total) 740ft / 225m

Time 5 hours

Sunset Time 16:24

Map OL7 - The English Lakes (south eastern area)

Start Grid Ref NY374042


There's only one way to start, and that's to echo all the good wishes I know Peter has received and wish him well. He knows we will all look forward to his return as soon as he feels fit and able. He will be missed, big time.
In his absence the route planned is hopefully a safe bet - not because of being over cautious two weeks on, but because it seems from my quick check of the last few 'B' walks from Ambleside, that the ever popular circular stroll around Rydal Water and Grasmere, including the Rydal caves, Loughrigg Terrace and returning on the 'coffin route', has not been done for a while at least.
Large parts of it certainly have, as part of other walks, with good reason too, as lovely views abound. So, fingers crossed, if the weather is smiling, we can't go wrong - except the walk set out below would be nicer if Peter were here too!
Rydal water circular from Ambleside
From the car park we take the narrow country lane alongside the River Rothay towards Pelter Bridge. We then make a short ascent through woodlands - below Loughrigg Fell, and above Rydal Water - which takes us to the Loughrigg quarries. Here, the 'big cave' used to boast it could house the whole population of Ambleside. It has not shrunk, but presumably as Ambleside has expanded, that might not be quite as true today.
The walk then continues on to Loughrigg Terrace, with its delightful views over Grasmere, before doubling back along the shoreline path to White Moss. Crossing the main A592, we climb through more woodland and turn back towards Ambleside along the 'coffin route' to Rydal Hall where, even in January, we could linger a little while to view 'The Grot' (a summerhouse designed for viewing the waterfall), and the formal gardens (designed by Mawson).
All that then remains, is to stroll through Rydal Park back into Ambleside, its waiting pubs and the coach.
22/12/2019 - KENDAL

B WALK for the 5th January 2020

YEALAND CONYERS or WARTON

Leader Peter Rossall

Distance ~7 miles / ~11.2 km

Ascent (total) ?

Time ?

Sunset Time 16:03

Map OL7 - The English Lakes (south eastern area)

Start Grid Ref ?


Hi all,
"Happy New Year" to you all.
Right, that's the BS out of the way, now for the (semi) serious stuff. In the fortnight since we last trod the fells I've been relatively busy and have not really had time to concentrate on what I wish to do this Sunday.
The fact that we're in an area that I don't know just adds to my confused state as I'm not 100% certain where we will actually be finishing - which could cause a problem or two! - so, with that in mind, I've based my route on us finishing in Yealand Conyers where we could conregate at the New Inn before heading off for our Xmas lunch.
Alternatively, we could finish in the village of Warton - that's Warton of Crag fame as opposed to Military Aircraft fame - where the Malt Shovel Inn or the George Washington are both on Main Street and would doubtless be delighted with our custom - with either finish point seeing us having had a leisurely walk on part of the Lancashire Coastal Way before ascending the aforementioned Warton Crag, with a distance of around 7 miles, so not overly long but enough to build up an appetite.
As for a start point, I was looking at beginning from the A6 towards the northern end of Bolton le Sands, this would entail us leaving the M6 at junction 34 (Lancaster) and following the newish A683 northern Lancaster bypass to reach the A6.
If John has other plans for a starting or finishing point, I'm happy to make whatever alterations are required to fit in with his plans.
See you on Sunday,
Pete.

2019

22/12/2019 - KENDAL

B WALK for the 22nd December 2019

CUNSWICK and SCOUT SCARS from KENDAL

Leader Peter Rossall

Distance 6½ miles / 11 km

Ascent (total) 800ft / 244m

Time 4 to 4½ hours

Sunset Time 15:49

Map OL7 - The English Lakes (south eastern area)

Start Grid Ref SD517928


Hi all,
Our final day out of the year and it looks like we'll have decentish weather. A fairly easy stroll, one that we've done previously, although not for a while. Not sure how many will forego the delights of Xmas shopping for a day in the great outdoors but, for those of you who are, here's what I've got planned as a B walk.
Useless fact number one - I first lead this walk at the end of my first full year of leading the 'B' group exactly ten years and two days ago ... and I bet it hasn't changed all that much since.
Useless fact number two - We enjoyed that walk with a light covering of snow on the ground and a number of snow showers during the day, weather and conditions that I don't expect to be repeated this time around.
We begin our walk from the car park in Kendal. Leaving the town, we pass the Town Hall as we make our way via Beast Banks and Serpentine Road into Serpentine Woods which eventually brings us to Kettlewell Crag and sees us crossing the manuicured links of Kendal Golf Club, via the public footpath of course. Soon we'll reach and cross the footbridge over the busy A591 road, a road that we use extensively during any 12 month period.
Continuing uphill, we arrive at the cairn at the northern end of Cunswick Scar. From here we head due south on a path that, whilst not flat, would certainly be considered that by the locals. After some easy walking a radio mast comes into view on our right and we'll make for this, meeting and crossing the Underbarrow Road before climbing (again gently) onto Scout Scar where we'll arrive at the aptly named "Mushroom" shelter.
Basically that's all the climbing done for this year as all we have left for 2019 is the descent back into Kendal, via a path that takes us across what was once Kendal's Racecourse before we join the Brigsteer Road, which leads us back across the A591 and directly into Kendal.

Finally, thanks to you all for putting up with me throughout the year, I've had a blast and luckily not missed all that many outings this year. That said, please may I publicly thank Les Holt and Graham Page for either standing in when I was absent, or for giving you a further variation to the usual 'A' and 'B' walks. Much appreciated by everybody fella's, "Cheers". Have a great festive break and we'll do it all again in the next decade.
8/12/2019 - KIRKBY LONSDALE

B WALK for the 8th December 2019

KIRKBY LONSDALE

Leader Peter Rossall

Distance 8½ miles / 14 km

Ascent (total) 820ft / 250m

Time 5 hours

Sunset Time 15:47

Maps OL7 - The English Lakes (south eastern area) and OL2 Yorkshire Dales (south & west areas)

Start Grid Ref SD534825


Hi everyone,
I'm working over the next couple of days so I thought I'd get my route sorted fairly early for a change. A walk that we've done previously, though not for a good few years.
A bit early yet to be 100% certain but, when I checked earlier today, the forecast for Sunday is not overly promising with sunshine and showers predicted, all backed up by a very strong breeze (30 to 40mph). Hopefully the next couple of days see that wind arrive earlier (lets say Saturday) or after we've departed on Sunday.
That said, our destination of Kirkby Lonsdale has much appeal to it with cafes and pubs aplenty, its own brewery and ... a Christmas Market to interest those who like that type of thing.
See you on Sunday, whatever the weather.
Pete.
Another walk today that we've done previously, although it was four and a half years ago when we last did it and, because of the shorter daylight hours available at this time of year, I've made a slight alteration to the start point which has reduced the overall walk length by a couple of miles.
Pulling off the M6 at junction 36 we'll depart from our coach here and make our way very carefully eastwards via the A590 for 200 hundred yards to the next roundabout where we'll turn south to follow the A6070 for a short stretch before turning onto the minor road of Dovehouse Lane. All this tarmac treading eventually brings us to the Lancaster canal where we can join the towpath. We follow the canal for about half a mile before leaving it to encounter a wee bit more tarmac. As the road turns sharp right by Townend Farm, we turn left to head uphill across a field before beginning a steady ascent that sees us finish atop Farleton Fell.
Lots of limestone pavement (similar to that at Malham Cove) around here and we’ll head south across Holmepark Fell to meet the aptly named Limestone Link which we’ll follow around Hutton Roof Crags to end up back on more tarmac as we arrive at the village of Hutton Roof. Thankfully were not on the tarmac for long before we negotiate a number of fields and meadows as we head inexorably to our final destination of Kirkby Lonsdale.
24/11/2019 - STAVELEY

B WALK for the 24th November 2019

WINDERMERE to STAVELEY

Leader Peter Rossall

Distance 7½ miles / 12 km *1

Ascent (total) 1,581ft / 482m *2

Time 4½ to 5 hours

Sunset Time 16:47

Map OL7 - The English Lakes (south eastern area)

Start Grid Ref SD413987


Hi all,
You already know what I'm planning for this Sunday, but here it is a more condensed form. Weather looking OK ish (up to now) ...
Pete.
Those of you who receive my e-mails will be aware that I've opted to do the same walk that we did last December, which proved quite popular, but with an alternative starting point, due in no small circumstance to the fact that although I don't have an aversion to using the same route a second time, I'm not keen on using it within 12 months of its last appearance. That said, those sharp eyed ones amongst you will note that this alternative sees us scaling the dizzy heights of Orrest Head, even though we only climbed that TWENTY EIGHT DAYS AGO (what were you saying about not repeating yourself Pete?) ... In my defence, we'll be climbing it via a different route to the last time and for no other reason than it adds a bit of mileage to what would otherwise be a rather short walk. The walk has three little ascents although there's nothing that gets the heart racing too fast, and it ends in Staveley which for reasons that I can't quite explain - although I have my suspicions why - is becoming an annual event for Wyre Ramblers.
For the second time in a month we'll alight from the coach close to the Tourist Information Centre in Windermere, with the possibility to make use of the loos in Booths before heading up to Orrest Head via the usual route, as opposed to the convoluted one we took last time. Views enjoyed, we'll leave our wee summit to the tourists whilst we get on with doing some proper rambling. We'll make our way towards and across the A591 road to cross open meadow towards the Droomer housing estate. This involves crossing the Railway line, something that we've done on numerous occasions in the past, generally when we've been on our way to Bowness and a meeting with the Ferryman ... although the less said about that, the better.
We're not heading to the lake this time and instead we'll leave the path to head uphill to School Knott which, just like Orrest Head, is a tiny bump that affords 360 degree views. Down below us to the south east is an attractive small tarn, un-named on the OS map but often called School Knott Tarn because of the proximity of the two. We'll leave the summit and pass by the tarn's north western edge before reaching the Dales Way long distance path where our alternative beginning to last years walk finishes.
Doubtless you'll all remember every last bit of last years route - when I reccied it earlier this week I didn't - and, as is usual for walking in the Lake District, you're either heading uphill or downhill with very little flat, although the ups and downs are very gentle, save for one section of walking along a minor road where we'll head very steeply downhill before turning sharp left to be met be a 'wall' that goes back uphill, again very steeply. The bonus is that once we've scaled this bit of road, we then get to go steeply downhill again (Oh yippee!).
After that its a doddle with the sanctuary of Staveley and either Wilf's Cafe or the Hawkshead Brewery and Beer Hall (or both if your so inclined) to enjoy before we head back home.
27/10/2019 - AMBLESIDE

B WALK for the 27th October 2019

AMBLESIDE

Leader Peter Rossall

Distance 6½ miles / 10½ km *1

Ascent (total) 1,581ft / 482m *2

Time 4½ to 5 hours

Sunset Time 16:47

Map OL7 = The English Lakes (south eastern area)

Start Grid Ref SD413987


Hi all,
As the clocks go back this week, meaning that it'll be dark by quarter to five, I initially thought we'd have a rummage around on Loughriggs broad acres ... then I remembered that we did that last year. My second thought were to repeat a walk that we did a few years ago when we did an Ambleside 'horseshoe' ... the usual one is the Fairfield Horsehoe, but that is very definitely 'A' group territory, so instead I was contemplating doing a walk that went up the Scandale Valley and onto Red Screes before returning to Ambleside via Snarker Pike. Alas, my conservatism got the better of me once again and I considered that my second choice may be a little too daunting for some of my clan, particularly given the shorter daylight hours.
So then, I finally plumped for an old favourite, a shortish, relatively easy walk that has the option of an up-and-over add on for anyone who's feeling sprightly. It also includes the opportunity for us to try out the new bridge that has finally replaced the previous double footbridges that crossed Trout Beck after those original ones were washed away during the devasting floods of December 2015.
They may be some snow visible on the higher fells although snow shouldn't be (famous last words!) a problem for ourselves.
Here's what I have planned.
See you on Sunday.
Pete.
Ambleside, a place often visited by us, and one that regularly used to be our final walk of the year as it was an area that allowed us to enjoy a relatively short walk before we went off to enjoy our Xmas lunch at any number of different locations. A combination of events - another alternative establishment tried, and it would seem that its proved fairly popular as we've returned to it for three (or is it four?) years on the trot - added to the fact that through the popularity of our new destination, our Xmas lunches got rearranged and have now taken place after our first walk of the year rather than the last. What this meant (for me) was that my usual 'short and easy' Xmas walk had been shelved for a few years, although we did do it two years ago in December '17, but with one slight diversion, caused by an often crossed bridge still not having been repaired since it was washed away in the floods of 2015. It has now been replaced with a shiny new bridge so, allowing for the fact that we've got shorter daylight hours from this Sunday, I'm delighted to take us all to see - and cross - this new bridge. I know its hardly the height of excitement but simple things like this please me!
Leaving the coach close to the Tourist Information Centre in Windermere, we’ll possibly make use of the loos in Booths before heading up to Orrest Head, a summit that, despite its lack of height, is a wonderful vantage point for a very early 'morning coffee break’. Leaving the summit we'll follow our usual route towards Troutbeck - lots of you will have done this route on so many occasions previously that you'll be able to do it with your eyes closed but don't do that, because you'll be missing some splendid views. Now for the days highlight - Really Pete? - where we drop down to cross Trout Beck via the new bridge ("Whoopee") ... before we climb up the other side of the valley and eventually onto Robin Lane.
Shortly we'll arrive at a point where we have decision to make. Do we climb to Wansfell Pike - adding a little distance and 750ft of ascent - or continue on the lower route that we've often taken past High Skelghyll Farm and Jenkin Crag to end shortly afterwards in Ambleside?. In our group we may have a combination of people who'd prefer the high or low option and, for those that wish to take the lower option, the navigation is simple - basically just keep following your nose and you'll end up in Ambleside. For any who'd prefer the higher option, the worst aspect is the descent off Wansfell Pike which is both rocky and steep.
Despite only being a relatively short walk, it has enough about it to get the pulse racing at times, and the views are usually pretty fine. On the plus side, the weather is promising to behave this Sunday and of course, the reason for our shorter daylight hours is because the clocks go back and we get an extra hour in bed on Saturday evening.
13/10/2019 - APPLEBY

B Walk for 13th October 2019

APPLEBY in Westmorland

Leader Peter Rossall

Distance 8 miles / 13 km

Ascent (total) 800 ft/ 244m

Time 5 hours

Sunset Time 18:16

Map OL19 – Howgill Fells & Upper Eden Valley

Start Grid Ref NY684203


Hi all,
I've had a look at the forecast for Sunday and all I can say is ... its still fairly early so it may change. Its saying that in and around Appleby in Westmorland that there's an 80% chance of rain between 7am (which won't bother us) and 1pm (which may). That said, looking on the bright side, it means there's a 20% chance that it won't be raining ... and the rain is only predicted to be light rain, and there's no appreciable wind expected so it sounds like a champion day to me. If we do get any rain, it may just make my walk a little muddy!, talking of which, here's what I've got planned.
A new area for me to walk in today and so, with some help from the internet, I've arranged an easy, albeit relatively muddy, walk that sees us follow two rivers - well, one river and one beck to be exact - although inspite of the mud, because I've been and tried it out last weekend, I can assure you that it has much to commend it.
The coach will drop us off outside the Tourist Information Centre on the main street (Boroughgate) where free toilets are available close by. From there we'll head uphill to High Cross where Appleby Castle stands. We may be able to walk into (and hopefully through) the grounds although they were closed to the public last weekend. Castle visited or not, we'll end up one way or another down Castle Bank where a ford across the river Eden is situated. Thankfully a substantial bridge is also available and we'll cross the river by it, basically just to see a bit of sculpture, the Primrose Stone.
Sculpture viewed, and maybe picture(s) taken, we'll head back across the bridge to follow the riverside path to Ormside. There may be areas where the path becomes a little bit muddy ... but its nothing that we can't negotiate. Shortly before reaching Great Ormside we'll find ourselves going under a railway bridge carrying the famous Settle to Carlisle line. A stretch of road walking sees us pass under the railway again before we reach a crossroads where you can buy some Duck Eggs, honest! (£2 a box).
We continue straight on at the crossroads before taking a footpath across a couple of soggy fields brings us to another minor road. Just around the corner is where we meet Rutter Force, a wonderful waterfall situated on Hoff Beck. We'll follow Hoff Beck back towards Appleby, crossing it twice via footbridges, before meeting a road at the hamlet of Hoff. Here is a country pub - The New Inn at Hoff - in the traditions of real country pubs and, if everyone is happy to 'waste' half an hour or so here they'll find no argument from me. One small aspect is that we'll probably be asked to remove our muddy boots before entering, but that's no problem is it?
Having sated our thirst, we'll leave the pub by continuing to follow Hoff Beck - with a few more muddy bits to look forward to - before we arrive at Bandley Bridge, where we'll cross the beck and head through Rachel's Wood, climbing gently as we do to arrive on high ground to the south west of Appleby that should, weather permitting, offer us a fantastic view of High Cup directly ahead, one of Britains special places. A look to the left may also offer us a wonderful view of Blencathra. All that's left is to head through a housing estate to follow a paved riverside path (so no mud) that returns us to the Tourist Info Centre from where you're free to enjoy the delights that Appleby has to offer.
29/9/2019 - BRAITHWAITE

B Walk for 29th September 2019

BRAITHWAITE

Leader Peter Rossall

Distance 6.5 miles / 10.6 km

Ascent 1683 ft/ 513m

Time 4.5

Sunset Time 18:54

Map OL4 The Englsh Lakes (North Western Area)

Start Grid Ref NY237236


G'day all,
Some of you who viewed my little note (ahem!) on our facebook page may be aware that I went to the Lake District on Tuesday to reconnoitre a walk for this Sunday. This was because I'd toyed with the idea (a month ago when we were in the same area) of tackling Causey Pike although I've opted not to do that this time around.
That said, the opportunity for one of our other leaders to take a group up and across Causey Pike and Scar Crags is very definitely a possibility without impinging on my plans.
The weather forecast for Sunday does not make attractive viewing currently although, on the plus side, all of the various weather websites that I use are saying that they have low confidence in relation to the timings they're issuing so, just like me last Tuesday when the forecast was dire, it may not be as bad as promised. It appears that we will get some rain, although it'll be light rain (so that's OK then eh!) and it'll be quite warm which means that we'll be putting raincoats on and getting too flaming hot.
Anyway, here's what I'm doing. See you all on Sunday,
Pete.
Four weeks ago when our 'B' group walked from Braithwaite to Buttermere via Ard Crags, some of you may remember me suggesting that when we returned to this area (in a month) that Causey Pike could be an option for that day. We've done it before and I've thought long and hard in the intervening period about the abilities of everyone who usually walk with the 'B' group and decided that *Causey Pike would be a little too difficult for some of them. So. what to do instead was my next challenge. I decided on the hill that sits next door to Causey, is lower than its senior neighbour, although only by a paltry 240ft, and rather self indulgently, is a hill I've never done before so that also influenced my thinking. Hopefully that will be the case for a few of us as ticking off another Wainwright is always a worthy effort.
Having parked the coach on the minor road just off the A66 we'll head through Braithwaite, passing the Village shop to begin climbing immediately. A small detour through a wooded area brings us back to the minor road that passes some pleasant cottages before passing through a gate and onto a farm track. Soon we reach the ruins of High Coledale, partly hidden within a clump of trees.
Our view ahead shows Barrow on the left, Stile End directly ahead and Outerside to the right. Between Barrow and Stile End is Barrow Door with Causey Pike directly behind it. We have three options here - the route I propose to take sees us take the lower path to the right of Stile End, however, if any of our more energetic types wish to head over Stile End they can do this by heading directly for its summit, or alternatively, they can head to Barrow Door and then up and over Stile End. Whichever route is chosen, they all end at Low Moss which sits directly below Outerside, our high point for the day.
Once we reach Low Moss our route through the heather is easily identified. A short sharp pull up sees us reach one of those infamous false Lakeland summits, although the actual summit is very close and the gradient has eased dramatically. The summit offers views of the giants that make up the Coledale Round and the Force Crag mine, now owned by the National Trust and no longer in use although, because its a Site of Special Scientific Interest, its opened for visits a few times a year, the last one for this year being LAST SUNDAY. Still as it is almost 900ft below us we'd hardly be looking to visit it today.
All the hard work done for the day, all that remains is to continue across Outerside's summit as we make our way down to High Moss where we join the Stonycroft Gill path. This path is broad and offers us an easy descent down into the Newlands valley. Again, if any of our number are still feeling energetic, options are available to shoot off this path to conquer Stile End (again) or Barrow (probably the better option because of the views it affords) or, like me, you can remain on this easy path until it reaches the road where, once again, a further three options are possible. Option 1 (which is definitely the least interesting) is to follow the road all the way back to Braithwaite. Option 2 gives the possibility of leaving the road to head (gently uphill) over the lower slopes of Barrow or, Option 3 sees us leave the road to pass by Uzzicar Farm (with fantastic views of Catbells and Maiden Moor) before following the riverside path that follows Newlands Beck back into Braithwaite.
*Despite my reluctence to offer Causey Pike as a suitable 'B' walk today, the possibility for quite a few of our stronger walkers to undertake the challenge of that fine hill is very definitely available, and its do-able as we've done it twice previously as a 'B' walk. Anyone fancy taking it on and leading a small group across it?
15/9/2019 - ULVERSTON

B Walk for 15th September 2019

ULVERSTON

Leader Les Holt

Distance 8 miles / 12.8 km

Ascent ?

Time ?

Sunset Time 19:27

Map OL6 The Englsh Lakes (South Western Area)

Start Grid Ref SD288782


Hi all,
We have a slight change for you all this weekend, and I don't just mean because we're going to an area that, to the best of my memorty, we haven't visited since March 2005, no, the reason for the slight change is because John Adams is unavailable as he and Linda are away this weekend.
Thankfully, Graham Page - who proposed a visit to Ulverston at last Septembers AGM was already planning to lead the 'B' walk. and I was delighted to let him do so, not just because it would afford me a 'day off', more because the walks that Graham has led over the last couple of years have been thoroughly enjoyed by all who joined him on those walks.
At our recent AGM, Graham informed me that he had a walk arranged for the 'B' group, although its fair to say that by 'B' group standards it was fairly lengthy, Graham assured me that it was relatively easy and would be managable by the majority of those who generally walk with the 'B' group.
I wondered if I could possibly use some of the route arranged by Graham whilst also managing to 'lop off' a couple of miles ... however, a Knight in Shining Armour arrived (in the shape of Les Holt) as he had a walk of 8 miles that would be very suitable for those in the 'B' group who don't wish to add a further few miles to their day.
Obviously I'm assuming - something that perhaps I shouldn't do - that Les will be happy to take out the 'B' party as he's done it before and, just like Graham, always with much appreciation from his 'followers', and that Graham won't have a problem with myself promoting his walk to the senior outing of the day.
As for me, I'm undecided as to what to do. I do quite fancy Graham's walk - although 11 miles might wreck me! - and Les' walk sounds very pleasant, and interesting, so I may be making a decision on the day. That said, one thing that we should all enjoy is the fact that Sunday's weather is looking good.
Pete
Starting from Ulverston town centre, we make our way towards the disused Ulverston Canal, one of the shortest canals in the country.
Having reached the great expanse of the Leven estuary we next head for Conishead Priory, which since 1976 has been the site of a Buddhist Community.
The building(s) are quite spectacular apparently.
Onto Barsea before heading inland to pass by Urswick Tarn prior to making our way back to Ulverston where The Laurel & Hardy Museum - I'm sure you're all aware of this but, just in case, Stan Laurel was born in Ulverston - may be worth a visit.
1/9/2019 - BUTTERMERE

B Walk for the 1st September 2019

BUTTERMERE

Leader Peter Rossall

Distance 8 miles / 13 km

Ascent (total) 1841ft / 561m

Time 5¾ hours

Sunset Time 20:05

Map OL4 The English Lakes, North-western area

Start Grid Ref NY233236


Hi all,
I'm relatively early this week, although that may lead to conflicting information being presented. The walk I'm looking to do has been done before, just not by me, which is why I'm so keen to do it this weekend.
Sadly the weather - or at least the predicted weather - is doing its best to put off my attempt to 'conquer' Ard Crags (at last). Why, despite whatever time of year we come to Buttermere, is the weather so poor? ... even allowing for the fact that last year when we were here it was blisteringly hot (and it's been very pleasant on other visits as well) so, maybe I'm over egging the pudding relating to bad weather in this location!
Anyway, here's what I'm looking to do.
See you on Sunday, with a start time of 8am at Four Lane Ends (hopefully Redline are aware of that as they seem to have 'cocked-up' on quite a few of our single pick-ups recently).
Pete.
I'm being a little self indulgent once again in order to undertake, and complete, a walk that I personally have attempted to do on two occasions although I've been prevented from doing so both times. Hopefully the weather doesn't intervene, that being one of the reasons for one of my previous missed opportunities.
We'll leave the coach by the bus stop in Braithwaite village before following Newlands Beck for the next couple of miles to Stair where we head uphill to join the Newlands pass road which we'll follow until we reach the disused quarry, now a car park, where we'll leave the road to follow Rigg Beck gradually uphill.
We follow Rigg Beck for a short while before finding a point suitable for crossing it as our next port-of-call is the big lump ahead and slightly to our left. That is Ard Crags and before you ask "Is it a ‘ard climb ?", I dunno ‘cause I’ve never done it ... but it looks fairly steep to me. Not to worry, one foot in front of the other, take your time, stop for a breather and have a look around (as I’m sure the views will be spectacular) and soon we’ll be on the top and frolicking along the ridge as we lose 260ft of height before ascending a further 180ft towards the next high point of Knott Rigg.
That’s it, climbing done for the day so its all downhill from here. Once we reach the road's summit at Newlands Hause, the road becomes our companion (well actually the grass verge by the side of this relatively busy thoroughfare) as it heads steeply, and very steeply in places, directly down to the village of Buttermere and the delights of the Cafe, or either of Buttermere's two pubs - the Fish or Bridge Hotel and of course, our transport home.
NB: Upon viewing on Thursday evening the predicted weather for Sunday, its not looking too promising currently, with showers and gusty winds predicted for Sunday, surely I can't be denied a third time can I? ... If the weather does make a ridge walk unsuitable, or if any of our party decide that they'd rather not tackle the steep climb of Ard Crags, an alternative valley route is available, and navigationally its very easy to follow and, its easier, but still involves climbing around 1000ft.
18/8/2019 - HAWORTH

B Walk for the 18th August 2019

HAWORTH

Leader Peter Rossall

Distance* 8 miles / 13 km

Ascent (total) 882ft / 269m

Time 5 hours

Sunset Time 20:31

Map OL21 The South Pennines

Start Grid Ref SE016338


Hi all,
with apologies for its lateness.
Only a short and a relatively easy walk this weekend but it has it plus points as well. The weather is threatening to become a little showery in the afternoon, and to be backed by a stiffish breeze but, and here's one of the plus points, it'll be at our backs (which is always a god-send).
As for the other plus point, have a look at what I've got planned ...
See you all tomorrow.
Howarth, lovely place, but one that's not visited often by our group. Indeed in my not far short of sixteen years with the club we've only been here four times and, on the last one of those in 2012, I was absent due to those dreaded work commitments. Thankfully I've not had to suffer those this weekend. So what have I got for you?. Well, its a walk with a difference ... insofar as it includes a ride on a steam train (woo woo) on a preserved railway line, something that we also enjoyed not a million miles away from here last September.

Having dropped our 'A' party in Hebden Bridge, we'll begin our walk from the A6033 just south, and high above, the village of Oxenhope. Via a combination of paths and tarmac/pavements we'll head through the eastern side of Oxenhope to pick up the Worth Way, a route that runs from Keighley to Oxenhope and back and covers a distance of 11 miles when done as a circular walk. We'll be following it along the eastern side of the valley all the way to Keighley.
Its route uses a combination of paths, tracks and some tarmac as it swoops and rises along the valley side, eventually dumping us in Keighley where we've got a date with a steam train ... A twenty minute journey takes us to Howarth station where we'll depart and make our way through this lovely town. Plenty to see and do here and, hopefully, enough time to enjoy a leisurely walk around or, alternatively, relax in any of the available cafes and pubs.
With regards to the train journey, trains runs from Keighley to Oxenhope every 45 minutes. I'm assuming that we'll reach Keighley in time to catch the train due to depart at 15.00 although, if we're earlier, or later, that wouldn't cause us any undue problems other than increasing or reducing the time we'd have in Howarth itself. The fare for a single journey from Keighley to Howarth is £6
IF WE'VE HAD A GREAT DAY - and why wouldn't we? - YOUR THANKS SHOULD BE DIRECTED TOWARDS LES HOLT, FOR IT WAS HE WHO PLANTED THE SEED IN ME FOR INCLUDING A STEAM TRAIN RIDE WITHIN OUR DAY. "Cheers Les".
4/8/2019 - KESWICK

B Walk for the 4th August 2019

KESWICK

Leader Peter Rossall

Distance* 6½ miles / 10½ km

Ascent (total) 1752ft / 534m

Time 6½ hours

Sunset Time 21:08

Map OL4 The English Lakes – North Western Area

Start Grid Ref NY265236


Hi all,
with apologies for the lateness of the following info. I've had a week off work and part of my week involved going to Keswick to look at a walk that I wanted to do. Just as well that I did as part of the route is currently unavailable to us.
What that means is that we've lost about three miles, and a second climb, so, in an attempt to add a little more mileage, I've given an alternative option. If any of you wish to forego the additional bit but are reticent about finding your way back to Keswick, don't worry, as the navigation is simple from where the extra bit starts seeing as how you are already on the outskirts of the town anyway and road signs provide a back up just in case.
Weather wise it looks like we may get some light rain, although there's also a chance that we may get away scot free. Either way, the temperature is set to be pleasantly warm.
See you tomorrow,
Pete.
Today’s walk was meant to be longer than the six and a half miles indicated, sadly its had to be truncated because the route I was hoping to take that would see us include a second climb - of Latrigg - is presently unavailable. Whilst I admit that the distance is most definitely not suitable for a 'B' walk, I've looked at how we may add a little bit more and, by retracing some (easier sections) of our route, it is possible to add a further mile and a half. See below for further details.
Starting from the car park in Keswick - Booths supermarket opens at 9:30 on Sundays and has free toilet facilities - we’ll leave the car park and head over the Headlands towards Hope Park, turning right to pass by the northern end of Derwent Water where the boats are launched from. Continuing on we'll soon arrive at Friar's Crag, a wonderful viewpoint where we'll spend a few minutes to appreciate those views. We continue very easily along the lakeside, passing through a wooded area before turning left at a junction as we reach a clearing. A short stretch of walking adjacent to the Borrowdale road brings us to Great Wood Car Park and here's where the fun starts!
Passing through the car park we pick up the path marked for Ashness Bridge. Due to tree felling work that is currently being done, we're diverted from this path almost immediately although we'll rejoin it in a wee while. Shortly after rejoining the path we arrive at a footbridge over Cat Gill which is signposted for Ashness Bridge / Walla Crag however, despite Walla Crag being our ultimate destination, we do not cross the bridge, instead taking the stepped path to the left indicated by a fingerpost that says CAT GILL STEEP CLIMB....and it is.
Take your time, keep left (to avoid falling in the Gill and its various waterfalls) and eventually we'll emerge from the trees with our climb almost completed. I say almost because there's another quarter mile to reach the summit but, all of your efforts are worth it for the views, and we'll stop here for lunch as well.
All downhill from here as we head to Rakefoot before traipsing across various fields, cross the A591 road, and a few more fields to end at Castlerigg Stone Circle. This is the point where my original plan falters and so we have two options (see below).
*The easiest and most direct route is to follow the road back into Keswick, easy but boring. However, we can add a further one and a half miles which are also easy, but far less boring, with a mixture of road and field paths (some used earlier) to arrive back in Keswick anywhere between 30 and 45 minutes later than the shorter route would see us back.
21/7/2019 - EDALE

B WALK for the 21st July 2019

EDALE

Leader Peter Rossall

Distance 7½ miles / 12 km

Ascent (total) 1105ft / 337m

Time 5 hours

Sunset Time 21:20

Map OL1 The Peak District – Dark Peak area

Start Grid Ref SK120833


Hi all,
A relatively easy 'B' walk this weekend, although the possibility exists for alternativly lead walks to do something a little more strenuous.
Todays walk sees us in an area that I love, albeit that just as when we visit Malham, the highlights of each area tend to draw us in leading to us treading over ground that we've previously covered and, once again this year the same applies, although I've tried to alter our route sufficiently to give us a different start and finish.
We leave the coach on the Sheffield Road immediately below Rushup Edge just before the coach turns left to head through Mam Nick. A short stretch of road walking follows before we find a path that we'll take, passing by Windy Knoll, crossing another road before following a track that eventually reaches the Limestone Way. Here we'll turn north east and head steadily downhill through the lovely Cave Dale to arrive in Castleton where toilet facilities are available in the town's car park.
Heading out of the car parks rear entrance will bring us to Mill Bridge where we turn left and head up the Hollowford Road. This bit of tarmac rises at a steady gradient and is the beginning of a 475ft ascent. As we leave the road, the steepness increases considerably although on the plus side, the stiff incline takes us quickly to Hollins Cross, a major junction on the great Ridge due to it being the ridge's lowest point.
Straight across the ridge would take us directly to our destination of Edale but that's not for us, instead we'll turn left and head up (along a motorway of a path) to Mam Tor, adding a further 130ft of ascent. Great views in all directions are available from here. All that's left is to descend steeply off Mam Tor down to the road at Mam Nick - close to where we started this walk - turning right at the Nick to follow the path down past Greenlands and Hardenclough Farm into Edale where the coach will be.
A cafe is situated by the railway bridge, whereas passing under the bridge brings you to the Ramblers Inn. A quarter mile further up the road is the Nags Head, with inbetween the two pubs the National Park visitor Centre. We should have plenty of time to chill out.
7/7/2019 - BORROWDALE

B WALK for the 7th July 2019

BORROWDALE

Leader Peter Rossall

Distance 7 miles / 11.25 km

Ascent (total) 938 ft / 286 m

Time 5½ hours

Sunset Time 21:47

Map The English Lakes OL4 – north western area

Start Grid Ref NY264189


Hi all,
Sorry its a bit late, but here's what I'm planning to do tomorrow. Not sure how many are out but the weather is predicted to be OK so, if you're not booked on, there's no England womens team to watch in the World Cup Final, the Wimbledon Final and the Cricket World Cup finals are a week away and the Tour de France is still only in its infancy and the garden can wait for another day surely. See ya tomorrow,
Pete.
I thought long and hard about what to do today - actually I generally do that anyway - before finally deciding that we'd visit a fell that we were due to visit last year but which, because of the very warm weather on the day we were last here, we chose to save it for another day. Not a particularly long walk and, with a little too much tarmac pounding involved, although I've tried to add enough interest to make for an enjoyable day.
We start today’s walk as we reach the southern end of Derwent Water on the B5289 just by the Lodore Hotel, from where we'll make our way to the Chinese Bridge that crosses the River Derwent. Unlike previous occasions, we're not crossing it today, choosing to follow the river for a short while instead before the path guides us back to the B5289. A short stretch of walking on the narrow footpath that accompanies this road ensues before we take a bridleway on the left that takes us around Grange Crags and into Cummacatta Wood.
Providing I don't lose my way - always a possibility when I'm surrounded by trees - we'll end up in the car park that serves the Bowder Stone, an extremely large rock that is quite a sight (if you've never seen it before), with a stepped *ladder that enables us all to visit its 'summit'. Shortly after visiting the stone the path continuies southwards and returns us back to the road and we have around a mile to walk along this stretch to Rosthwaite (where toilet facilities exist) before we cross the river Derwent once again and turn back on ourselves to head towards Castle Crag. This was the lovely little fell that we chose to forego last year and, irrespective of whether you've been here previously or not, you're in for a treat as the views are tremendous.
We partly retrace our route from Castle Crag's summit before turning southwards onto the Bridleway (part of the Cumbria Way) that runs along its western flank and we keep to this for the next couple of miles prior to turning left and heading, very steeply, downhill to the hamlet of Seatoller and, a further quarter mile on, our final destination of Glaramara House where refreshments, and our coach, will be.
*I was informed earlier this week that the old wooden ladder has been replaced by a shiny new aluminium one, so there's no excuse for anyone not reaching the top, although as always, its not compulsory to do so.
23/6/2019 - CONWY

B WALK for the 23rd June 2019

CONWY (Conway)

Leader Peter Rossall

Distance 7¾ miles / 12¼ km

Ascent (total) 1,207ft / 368 m

Time 5½ hours

Sunset Time 21:47

Map OL17 – Snowdon & Conwy Valley

Start Grid Ref SH782774


Morning all,
I'm on holiday presently and that allowed me to have a very enjoyable day in Conwy (Conway) on Tuesday having a look around to see what we could do for a walk this weekend. As described in my walk description, I've opted to do a repeat of the walk that we did two years ago but with a few little tweaks, the most significant one being that we'll do it in the opposite direction, which, in my humble opinion, makes it even better than it already was.
As its Wales I don't expect the coach to be full so, if anyone doesn't fancy a walk but fancies a cheap day out, this area is very nice and Conway is a lovely town to visit. If you know of any non-walking friends who may fancy a cheap awayday, there would probably be room for them.
Weather is looking good for the weekend. Here's what I've got.
Pete.
Conwy, a lovely place, only visited once before by our club and thoroughly enjoyed by everyone. Although our previous visit was only two years ago, I've decided to repeat the walk we did last time, but with a slight difference, seeing as how I've been and reccied it and done it in the reverse direction and, hindsight being the wonderful thing that it is, I actually think that its better done that way.
Starting from the coach park in the shadow of Conwy Castle where (free) toilet facilities exist, we'll make our way under the railway line before passing the Railway Station and heading fairly steeply uphill as we pass through the town walls and leave the town via the Sychnant Pass road. Thankfully we're soon able to leave the pavements and head across some field paths, though not for long as a bit more road walking is necessary.
Finally we reach the stage where we have a bit of fell walking and you'll be pleased to know that its uphill, and very steeply, although the steep bit doesn't last for that long and it does lead us to a nice flattish area where we can enjoy an elevenses stop if you fancy?. More climbing follows, but far less steeply than we'd encountered previously and brings us to what I propose to be our lunch spot (weather permitting) by Llyn y Wrach, a very small lake.
Lunch taken, we'll climb gently away from the lake to join the North Wales Path and, having passed through a gate, we'll begin to get wonderful views out to Puffin Island and the eastern tip of Anglesey. Downhill to cross the road close to the summit of the Sychnant Pass we now begin our second ascent of the day, although this one is nowhere near as steep or long as the first. What is does do is give us fabulous views over Conwy Bay and towards Llandudno and the Great Orme and, it also sees us topping out on Conwy Mountain which is something that we didn't do last time.
Almost all downhill from here and, by looking to our right, or inland, you'll see all of those grand buildings that we passed earlier on in the day when we were traipsing along the tarmac. We arrive at a stile which marks the end of the mountain and the beginning of the town and whilst its possible to take a more direct route back to the town, the preferred option is to use a footbridge to cross the railway line and then the coastal path which brings us to the Quayside where the Smallest House in Great Britain, and the Liverpool Arms pub, sit virtually side by side. Ice creams are also readily available and the town itself has plenty of other charms with a number of pubs, cafes and chip shops awaiting our custom. If any of you still have the energy, the town walls are always worth investigating. As for the coach park, that's five minutes away and easy to find.
Todays walk is relatively short and not overly strenuous, although it does have its moments that will get the blood flowing and the pulse racing. That said, there are lots of possible cut off points and easier options available, particularly on Conwy Mountain as that hill has a multitude of pathways, all of which are easily followed.
9/6/2019 - GLENRIDDING

B WALK for the 9th June 2019

GLENRIDDING to POOLEY BRIDGE via AIRA FORCE

Leader Peter Rossall

Distance 9.25 miles / 15 km

Ascent (total) 1,568 ft / 478 m

Time 5½ to 6 hours

Sunset Time 21:45

Map Explorer OL5 - The English Lakes - North Eastern Area

Start Grid Ref NY386172


Hi all,
Delighted to say that I've escaped the dreaded required-at-work scenario so the next problem was deciding what to do in an area that offers plenty of scope. I plumped for a repeat of a (very popular) walk that we did three years ago. Based on the forecasted conditions (breezy and with possible showers, thankfully they're expected to lessen as the day progresses) I decided we'd do a relatively low level walk, albeit that it does have quite a few highlights and nice views.
The Lake District is expected to receive quite a bit of rain on Saturday so the waterfall we'll be visiting should look fairly spectacular, let's hope so.
As well as this walk and whatever John has planned, the possibility for alternative walks to be available is always an option for this location. Here's what I'll be doing.
See ya Sunday,
Pete.
Glenridding via the Kirkstone Pass offers so many options that I'm at a loss as to know what would prove a favourite for everyone, so, picking from my back-catalogue of walks in this area, I've chosen to repeat one that was done as recently as three years ago, simply because on that day it proved incredibly popular. Whether you've done it before or not, hopefully I've made a good decision.
Having enjoyed the views as we ride over the Kirkstone Pass and parked up at Glenridding, we'll avail ourselves of the amenities - which basically means the public toilets - before setting off for a leisurely walk along the shoreline of Ullswater for about a mile and a half before we head uphill to view the wonderful Aira Force waterfall. The forecast is for quite a bit of rain around the Lake District on Saturday so, providing its not late and thereby soaking us on Sunday, it should make Aira Force look pretty spectacular.
Weather permitting, a morning stop would seem logical as this will allow various photo opportunities prior to us heading away from the falls and gently uphill, with views across and along Ullswater becoming enhanced as we get higher. Down below us should be Lyulphs Tower, supposedly visited often by William Wordsworth, with this area being recognised as the inspiration for arguably his best known *poem.
Continuing along the ‘balcony’ footpath of Gowbarrow Fell we pass through Swinburn’s Wood and below Priest’s Crag before arriving at the quaint little village of Bennethead. Once through the village we take to field paths again, passing close by Maiden Castle (not much of a castle actually!), before being deposited in a caravan park!. A couple of fields sees us back to the main A592 road just by the turn off to Pooley Bridge and, half a mile later, we finish in Pooley Bridge itself where we should have ample time to enjoy some light refreshments before being picked up by our coach ready for the return home.
*Wordsworth poem, I’m sure you all know it.
"I wandered lonely as a cloud,
That floats on high o’er vales and hills,
When all at once I saw a crowd,
A host of golden daffodils,
Beside the lake, beneath the trees,
Fluttering and dancing in the breeze".
12/5/2019 - CALDBECK

B WALK for the 12th May 2019

CALDBECK

Leader Peter Rossall

Distance 8 miles / 12.75 km

Ascent (total) 1,568 ft / 478 m

Time 5½ hours

Sunset Time 21:06

Map Explorer OL5 - The English Lakes - North Eastern Area

Start Grid Ref NY357379


Hello everyone,
I'm happy to report that this Sunday I've managed to secure the day off work so, whether that's good news for you all or not is for others to decide, however, on a personal and very selfish note, I'm bloody delighted. The weather looks OK for Sunday with NO RAIN, a gentle breeze and fantastic views guaranteed ... that's what the forecast indicates so don't shout at me if it throws it down whilst blowing a howling gale and we can't see our hands in front of our faces (it won't be like that, honest). I looked at doing a low level walk because, unlike you lot I'm out of practice, but I opted in the end (mainly because of the good weather forecast) to head uphill instead. Here's what we've got.
See ya on Sunday,
Pete.
So happy to be back with you all after my work enforced absences and, for a starter, I'd like to say a big "Thank you" to all of you for your patience, and particularly to those who stepped in during my absence to undertake leader duties on my behalf. The pictures that I saw and the general feedback that I got indicated that our stand-in leaders had done a fabulous job. I hope you all enjoyed the responsibility because I'm not in a position to say that I'll never be unavailable again. Thanks once again. As for today, I've decided that we'll use the same route that we did in 2016, a route that includes climbing High Pike, which is no monster hill, but one that still gives us good views. PS: Don't go too fast for me because I may be a bit out of practice.
Leaving the coach at Wood House between Millhouse and Hesket Newmarket, we’ll make our way gently uphill via a number of fields to Calebreck from where we’ll follow the bridleway that uses the Carrock Beck valley to ascend all the way to High Pike’s summit (2,158ft / 658m) with tremendous views north to the Solway Firth and south to Skiddaw.
Because he lives in Caldbeck, there's always a possibility that we'll bump into Britain’s most famous mountaineer - Sir Chris Bonnington - although irrespective of whether we do or not, its basically all downhill from here, using the well trodden Cumbria Way to finish in Caldbeck from where we’ll have ample time to sample the delights of either The Old Smithy Tearoom or The Oddfellows pub.
There's also the opportunity for anyone who'd prefer to enjoy the delights of the celebrated Old Crown pub in Hesket Newmarket to veer off in that direction and, because our coach will be coming through the village, you won't have to walk back to Caldbeck.
28/4/2019 - KETTLEWELL

B WALK for the 28th April 2019

Hi all,
As some of you may already be aware, once again I've got to work this Sunday [Grrrrr] but, Les Holt has forwarded a couple of options that he'd arranged as possible walks suitable for the 'B' group.
Both walks look good. Obviously Les can only lead one - and I suspect that he already has a preference for the one he fancies - so, what that means is that if anyone wishes to do the alternative one, the chance is there.
Have a great day, the weather is not predicted to be as good as it was last weekend but still not bad. Sincerely hope that I can rejoin you all next time out (I feel like I keep repeating myself by saying that) as I'm missing you all far more than you miss me.
Here's what les has to offer.
Pete.
Option 1

KETTLEWELL circular

From Kettlewell a path on the western side of the river Wharfe, which is in fact 'the Dales Way', passing by Starbotton on the opposite side of the valley and leads to the bridge that crosses the Wharfe just outside the village of Buckden.
From here we leave the Dales Way and, via a short stretch of road walking, begin our return by using the bridleway that runs from Redmire to Firth Fell (607m/1991ft). Upon reaching the trig point we'll follow the walls over Old Cote Moor Top in a south easterly direction until we reach a further bridleway on our left which heads downhill towards Starbotton.
Half way down, we veer off to the right to follow another bridleway that will return us directly back to Kettlewell.
Overall length - 10 miles, with 400m/131ft of ascent.

Start Grid Ref SD969723


Option 2

GRASSINGTON to KETTLEWELL

Leaving the coach at the convenient crossroads at Threshfield, the walk heads east towards Grassington, complete with a short detour that takes us to Linton and its waterfall. Passing through Grassington we then follow 'the Dales Way', passing various remains of ancient settlements as we head northwards over limestone escarpments towards Kettlewell, a place that has a good choice of refreshments.
Overall length - approximately 8 miles, with 150m/492ft of ascent.   

Start Grid Ref SD988633

31/3/2019 - ASKHAM

B WALK for the 31st March 2019

ASKHAM, NEAR PENRITH

Leader Graham Page

Distance 10 miles / 16 km

Ascent (total) 1450ft / 440m

Time 6 hours

Sunset Time 19:44

Map OL5 The English Lakes (North-eastern area)

Start Grid Ref: NY516239


Hi All,
Please find attached the planned B walk for next Sunday, posted a little earlier than usual, which may help some decide on their Mothers Day priorities.
Hopefully the weather will be ok, in which case it is an area for good wide and distant views.
Regards,
Graham
This week's destination, Askham, is on the very fringe of the Lake District National Park. It's a very picturesque Cumbrian rather than Lakeland village, blessed with two large village greens, two nice pubs, and a garden cafe - and often overlooked as the hoardes of visitors whizz past on the M6 (only 5 miles away) en route to the 'real' lakes.
It may not offer the mountainous terrain of much of the Lakes, but has its own distinctive character, with wide views, interest, and antiquities, and one of the far eastern fells still just in reach. The walk is long for B Group, but the paths are good and friendly, with time for Askham to be enjoyed afterwards.
Departing Askham, we enter the Lowther Estate, crossing the River Lowther, and walk through woods and along the riverbank to the hamlet of Whale. Another path across fields takes us to the attractive village of Helton.
Climbing about 300ft on a narrow country lane then gives access to the easy turf paths of Moor Divock, which long before ramblers came along, found popularity with the Romans and ancient Britons before them, as evidenced by the many cairns, burial mounds and circles. The start of the Roman "High Street" is encountered, and a circle of standing stones at 'the cockpit'.
We then continue climbing more steeply northwards to the summit of Arthurs Pike (1,747 ft), with lovely views over Ullswater, before doing an about-turn, back to 'the cockpit'. This time we head south along High Street towards Heughscar Hill (1,231 ft), and can climb its additional 200 ft if we want, for a final view over Ullswater - but may well decide we have done enough without it. All that then remains is to descend an attractive limestone embankment, with views to Lowther Castle and the Pennines beyond, down into Askham, where the coach, pubs, and cafe await.   
17/3/2019 - HAWKSHEAD

B WALK for the 17th March 2019

HAWKSHEAD

Leader To be confirmed ...

Distance 6½ miles / 10¾ km

Ascent (total) Approx 866ft / 264m

Time 5 hours

Sunset Time 18:19

Map OL5 The English Lakes - south eastern area

Start Grid Ref: SD369940


Morning all,
Sorry its late but, as those who read the stuff that I put on our facebook page will be aware, I'm unavailable due to work commitments tomorrow. My plan for this Sunday was to do the walk detailed below which, although its a very easy walk, was basically a "Thank you" for the harder walk that we did last time out.
Due to asll the wet weather that we've had recently, and because the walk I'd planned doesn't reach any great heights, I have a suspicion that the feeling that the ground underfoot may be a little bit muddy. That said, the weather for tomorrow is looking better than it is today.
Obviously because I won't be with you, we'll require someone to lead a suitable walk for the 'B' group. I thank in advance whichever of you good folk step forward to guide in my absence with the proviso that the walk I'd planned DOES NOT HAVE TO BE FOLLOWED just because I'd taken time to do it.
I'll send a copy of the walk I'd planned and a map with the coach tomorrow. Have a great St. Paddy's day.
Pete
After the more strenuous than usual walk that we enjoyed a fortnight ago, I'd decided that a nice easy walk was the order of the day for today ... then I discovered that I'd be unable to enjoy it as I have to work. What that means of course is that one of you good folk will be requested to lead our party in my absence and, as is always the case when this happens, whoever chooses to take the reins is given full licence to choose a completely different route if they so wish. Have a great day.
Our walk begins from Eel House which is about three quarters of a mile south of Esthwaite Water on the minor road that runs from Newby Bridge to Hawkshead along the western side of Windermere. Taking the minor road that crosses Cunsey Beck via Eel House Bridge, we continue along the road for a third of a mile until a path on our right is reached. Follow this uphill through Garnett Wood and eventually you'll leave the woods to follow paths across fields to reach another road at Town End, complete with its prominent church. Turn left and walk along this road for a short stretch of road before finding a path on the left which heads in the direction of Near Sawrey. Again another short stretch of road walking ensues taking us to the village of Near Sawrey.
Turn right into Stones Lane and follow this until you leave the tarmac and join a green lane. This bridleway rises gradually as it climbs onto Claife Heights, passing by Moss Eccles Tarn and Wise Een Tarn - a picture of which adorns Wyre Ramblers' website page - along the way. Eventually we reach the main bridleway between Hawkshead and Belle Grange (on the shore of Windermere lake) where we turn left. This route would take anyone directly back to Hawkshead but, owing to the short distance that we'll be doing today, I suggest that a detour to visit the tiny hill that is Latterbarrow would be well worth the effort involved. For such a small hill, Latterbarrow really does offer wonderful views.
Descending westwards off Latterbarrow brings you to a minor road where we'll turn left, then right after a short while into Loanthwaite Lane. Follow this road as it turns 90 degrees left before arriving at a 90 degree right hand bend. TWO PATHS head left on this bend, IGNORE the first one and TAKE THE SECOND ONE as it crosses a couple of fields to drop you onto a track (Scar House Lane) where you turn left. After about 20 yards, a stile on the right is reached, cross this and follow the path over the meadow to the village of Hawkshead where you can enjoy all the facilities that this place has.   
3/3/2019 - CAUTLEY SPOUT and the CALF

B WALK for the 3rd March 2019

CAUTLEY SPOUT and the CALF

Leader Peter Rossall

Distance 8½ miles / 13¾ km

Ascent (total) Approx 1827ft / 557m

Time 6 hours

Sunset Time 17:50

Map OL19 - The Howgill Fells

Start Grid Ref: SD713978


Hi all,
Delighted to find out that I've got this Sunday free of work commitments, so you're stuck with me again! I've got an oft repeated walk for us to do, one that's a little tougher than our normal 'B' walks but no less enjoyable for that.
I'm a little uncertain as to what we'll get weather wise, there's the threat of some light rain (possibly sleet) and of it being anywhere between breezy and a howling gale (at the moment the forecast indicates that the windier conditions are expected over Saturday evening and early Sunday morning with the breeze abating during Sunday), let's hope that's the case.
Our walk includes one long, very steep climb, which may well be beyond the capabilities of some of our usual recruits, that said, anyone who wishes to start with us and then take a less severe route to Sedbergh via a well trodden, and easily followed, bridleway can do so.
Here's what I've got, see you all on Sunday,
Pete
Just over two and a half years since we last did this route - with todays walk meaning it will be the fifth time we've done it in 11 years of me leading the 'B' group - so its by some distance the most regularly undertaken route that we do, although I give no apologies for that as its a cracker of a walk. It includes climbing alongside Englands highest above ground waterfall – Cautley Spout - although, because it falls in five separate cascades, you may be aware that there are larger single drop waterfalls but none that fall over the distance that Cautley Spout does.
We’ve done it previously in various weather conditions, snow and ice on one occasion, scorchingly hot on another and, while I don't anticipate either of those conditions this weekend, we may have a little rain (or sleet/snow) and a stiffish breeze. All told it’s a relatively easy walk, although it does include one of the steeper climbs that we ever do.
We begin our walk at Rawthey Bridge on the A683, approximately 5½ miles north east of Sedbergh and start easily, following the footpath along the north west side of the River Rawthey before joining a bridleway that we follow to Narthwaite Farm. After crossing Backside Beck we contour around the lower slopes of Ben End which eventually brings the imposing Cautley Crag into view with, further right higher up the valley, the waterfall of Cautley Spout, our very steep climb. Anyone who thinks this ascent may be beyond them can cross the footbridge and follow the bridleway that leads to Sedbergh.
We follow Cautley Beck, gently increasing our height prior to arriving at the foot of the waterfall and the very steep bit! All told, we've got 500metres (1,640ft) to climb to reach the top. It starts out on a grassy path before becoming a rocky stepped path. As you’re ascending keep having a breather and, don’t forget to constantly look back as the views are tremendous and eventually, the top (of the waterfall) will be reached. The climbing isn’t quite over yet, although it does get far less severe as we pull up onto the Calf, which at 2,218ft (676mtrs) is the highest point of the Howgill Fells.
Leaving the Calf, we head south east initially, passing Calders, before turning south west and traversing Rowantree Grains, continuing across the shoulder of Arant Haw prior to heading left before we reach Winder (which rhymes with cinder), towards our final destination of Sedbergh.  
17/2/2019 - CONISTON

B WALK for the 17th February 2019

Ambleside to CONISTON

Leader To be decided

Distance 6 miles / 9.5 km

Ascent (total) Approx 892ft / 272m

Time 5 hours

Sunset Time 17:24

Map OL7 The English Lakes - south eastern area

Start Grid Ref: NY345035


Hi all,
Some of you may already be aware (via facebook) that I'm unavailable for this Sunday. I had worked out a short, but very pleasant, new route to one of my favourite small fells and I'd even been and reccied the walk (yesterday), so it came as quite a shock once I'd returned to find out that I was required at work* this Sunday.
Because I'll not be with you, the opportunity arises for A N Other to lead our band of 'B' walkers. As is always the case in a situation like this, whoever decides to lead can choose whatever option they'd prefer to do and very definitely don't have to slavishly follow what I had planned.
I've just had a look at the weather for Sunday and it looks nowhere near as nice as what I had yesterday, so that may well influence whatever walk is chosen.
Whatever you do, have a great day and I'll (hopefully) see you all in early March.
Pete
* In all fairness, I have lots of work colleagues with young families and, it being half term and all that, I half suspected that I may be required at work this weekend ... Grrrr.
Apologies for the fact that I can't be with you this weekend - once again - just be assured that I'm more cheesed off with the situation than you'll be. I've actually been and recconoitred the walk described here so the fact that I then find out that I'm unavailable to join you for it is a major blow. As I won't be with you, there is a possibility that whoever leads you this weekend chooses to do another route instead and I'm comfortable with that.
This walk begins from the village of Skelwith Bridge and climbs onto Black Fell and its rather grandiosely named summit - Black Crag!. No paths are indicated on Ordnance Survey maps from this direction but, having been and looked, paths do exist, although they become a little indistinct at times.
Once at the summit, our route wends its way towards Tarn Hows - which is lovely and a perennial favourite - before heading gently downhill into Coniston for refreshments and our return journey.  
3/2/2019 - INGLETON

B WALK for the 3rd February 2019

CLAPHAM to INGLETON via Ingleborough

Leader Peter Rossall

Distance 7½ miles / 12 km

Ascent (total) Approx 1991ft / 607m

Time 5½ hours

Sunset Time 16:54

Map OL2 Yorkshire Dales – Southern & Western area

Start Grid Ref: SD744693


Hi all,
Clapham, or Ingleton, can only mean one thing ... INGLEBOROUGH. A lovely hill, one that we've climbed many times, but its always a goody. I imagine that both the 'A' and 'B' groups will be doing the same walk (well to start with anyway...), although the 'A's will travel faster and probably find a different route of descent to us 'B' group strollers.
Following the weather that we've had this week, I expect us to find a wee bit of snow at some stage during the day. The current forecast for Sunday on Ingleborough is for a dry day with the possibility of further snow late on in the day. A bit of breeze (from the south) that shouldn't cause us any undue concerns, although it will help in creating a little wind-chill. As always, hats and gloves will be an essential part of your kit for this Sunday.
See you all on Sunday.
We're on a well trodden route this weekend, having done the exact same walk on both recent occasions that we used Clapham as a start point and Ingleton as a destination [2016 and 2014]. Don't worry about having done it previously because its a very satisfying walk.
We begin from the village of Clapham where toilets are available. We cross Clapham Beck via a quaint footbridge before turning right and heading upstream. As we reach the outskirts of the village, two options are available to us. One takes us via a bridleway to Clapdale Farm whereas the other takes Clapdale Drive and follows the Beck through Clapdale Wood. The latter choice incurs a charge for the use of this ‘private’ path ... (I’m not sure how much the toll is because, despite being prepared to pay [we're nothing if not honest], on the two previous occasions we've used it without being charged). Hopefully we get lucky a third time.
Whichever way we choose to take, both paths do rejoin one another once they’ve passed the wooded area. The next ‘landmark’ is the entrance to Ingleborough Cave. Ignoring the cave and heading ever upward, we turn left to reveal Trow Gill a boulder strewn limestone ravine that’s spectacular but easily climbed and, once through it, we’re onto open fellside and heading for Gaping Gill (another limestone wonder) where the waters of Fell Beck fall 340ft into the cavern (so don’t get too close to the edge as we don’t want anyone falling in!) before they see daylight again by the entrance to Ingleborough Cave. As we’ve still got another 1000ft to ascend, we're best to keep pressing on, first passing Little Ingleborough before topping out at 2375ft on Ingleborough itself.
In the right conditions the views from here are superb, however it can be a fairly unforgiving place in poor weather and can be blisteringly cold even in the summer so, be prepared with a few extra layers. After this weeks weather I fully expect us to find some snow up here.
All that’s left is to head west-south-west for a 3 mile descent via Crina Bottom and the bridleway of Fell Lane that will take us into Ingleton to enjoy a well earned rest and/or beverage or two.  
20/1/2019 - GRASMERE

B WALK for the 20th January 2019

GRASMERE

Leader Peter Rossall

Distance 6.2 miles / 10 km

Ascent (total) Approx 1601ft / 488m

Time 6 hours

Sunset Time 16:27

Map The English Lakes OL7 - south eastern area

Start Grid Ref: NY339073


Hi all,
apologies that its late but, as always, better late than never.
It appears that both the 'A' and 'B' groups are planning to ascend Steel Fell (which wasn't pre-planned, honest) although the 'A' groups walk will also tack on a few more miles, together with a few more ups and downs.
As for us 'B' walkers, we'll unusually be doing a walk that sees us use the same route for the outward and return journeys. This does give the opportunity for any of you who fancy making it a fuller walk (without joining the 'A' group) to go-your-own-way and include a return route via the Helm Crag ridge, thereby adding a further 3 miles and a few more ups and downs.
The weather forecast is for a breezy day (getting quite windy by the afternoon, which by then will hopefully be at our backs) and with the possibility of a little sleet and/or snow.
See ya on Sunday.
Pete.
Grasmere, often visited by us and, creature of habit that I tend to be, we usually end up doing variations of the same three walks whenever we're in this area. Time for a change me thinks, so, instead we're going to climb a hill that I've never previously done - Steel Fell (with apologies for me being a little self indulgent) - but, as a bonus its a Wainwright ... so for any of you who are chasing the dream of completing the full set, its another one you can tick off. As for me, I've only got around another 150 to do and I'll have done the full lot (I have to say that I'm not 'chasing the dream') ...
Whilst much of our walk today will be easy, it does include one long slog of a climb of around 1500ft which will slow us down a little. Also very unusually, we'll be retracing our route on our return, albeit that there is also an option for any of our quicker (or more enthusiastic) walkers to make a circular route by continuing across the summit to tack on the Calf Crag / Gibson Knott / Helm Crag ridge, thereby adding just under three miles and a little bit more ascent to the overall walk. The 'A' group are also climbing Steel Fell before heading off to add a few more lumps and bumps (as is there wont), so that's another option.
We begin todays walk from the main car park in Grasmere before walking through the village (where toilet facilities are available) as we head via a combination of paths and minor roads to Ghyll Foot where our ascent starts in earnest.
Steadily upwards across the ridge of Cotra Breast sees us finally arrive at Steel Fell's summit.
Nice innit? ...
All that's left (unless your feeling adventurous) is to turn round and retrace our steps back to Grasmere.  
6/1/2019 - CARTMEL

B WALK for the 6th January 2019

CARTMEL

Leader Peter Rossall

Distance 8 miles / 13 km

Ascent (total) Approx 654ft / 199m

Time 4.5 hours

Sunset Time 16:05

Map The English Lakes OL7 - south eastern area

Start Grid Ref: SD381785


Hiya Everybody,
Hope you've all had a great Xmas break and not 'pigged-out' too much. If you have, I have a gentle re-introduction to the delights of fell walking, although giving any of the 'heights' that we'll be scaling on this walk the distinction of calling them a fell would be rather over-egging the pudding.
Weather looks good, with light cloud, the odd sunny spell and a gentle breeze forecast, and its been fairly dry whilst we've been away so all in all we should have a relatively trouble free amble. Just enough to build up an appetite.
Here's what I've got.
Pete.
Happy New Year to one and all and, personally speaking, its great to be back. As today marks the first walk that some of us will have had for a month, I thought I'd go easy on you by having a relatively gentle walk. The fact that we've got an Xmas lunch to consume later as well also helped to sway my thoughts. That's the plus side, the downside is that this is an area that I don't know particularly well and, rather than copying a walk that we've done when we've visited this area previously, I've opted to head off in a new direction ... so there's plenty of scope for me to mess up ("Not for the first time" I hear you say), hopefully I'll return us in time for us to enjoy our dinner!
As said, our previous walks in this area have seen us do a linear walk, usually from Grange-over-Sands to Cartmel via Hampsfell Hospice but, because we've done that a number of times, I figured that a new route wouldn't be a bad thing. Only time will tell. We'll start from our usual parking spot opposite the School in Cartmel itself from where we'll walk through the village towards the Racecourse.
We'll follow bridleways, paths and the odd quiet road as we pass by such places as Long Scar, How Barrow and Ellerside, all of which are part of Bigland Scar and supposedly giving great views over the Leven estuary. A few (small) ups and downs follow as we pass by Speel Bank and Grassgarth before a short stretch of tarmac sees us finding our next path which we'll take towards Over Ridge.
Just over a mile left - providing my navigation has been correct! - a mile that sees us finish by crossing Cartmel Racecourse. Crossing a racecourse gives me the idea of offering an incentive to anyone who wishes to make a dash for the finish line ... just don't expect me to be one of 'em.
Now for dinner.  

2018

25/11/2018 - CHIPPING

B WALK for the 25th November 2018

CHIPPING

Leader Peter Rossall

Distance 8½ miles / 13½ km

Ascent (total) Approx 1,312ft / 400m

Time 5¾ hours

Sunset Time 15:59

Map OL41 Forest of Bowland and Ribblesdale

Start Grid Ref: SD622433


Hello everyone,
So then, the lovely Bowland Fells it is once again. Short journey time there and back means we'll be home in time for "Strictly", or "The Jungle" thingy, or X-Factor ... or maybe even something good like that Attenborough fella.
Weather is looking good, so hopefully we'll have another great day.
See you on Sunday.
Pete
As a club, we'd never been here until January of last year and, whilst some of our clan were initially a little underwhelmed by its inclusion as a destination, the good day that we had in these relatively small, but still very pleasant hills, must have meant that it ticked enough boxes to warrant a further visit so soon. As one of a few club stalwarts who kept pushing for this area to be included occasionally on our rota, I have to say that I'm delighted to be back here so quickly.
As described above, because last years trip here - well its 22 months ago, so near as damn it two years! - proved popular, I've taken the liberty of repeating the same route. We'll use the parking area by the Football Club where public toilet facilities are close by before heading to the hills. A short stretch of road walking brings us to a fingerpost guiding us into a field, a rather muddy field last last time, hopefully a little drier this time around. but we’ve been through worse.
Eventually we cross a minor road to take a track to Saddle End Farm from where we commence our climb onto Saddle Fell. A steady pull up leads us to the fence that takes us towards Fair Snape Fell where we'll find "Paddy's Pole", our 'high point' of the day. Turning for home, our next destination is Parlick before a steepish descent towards Fell Foot.
From here various options for our return to Chipping exist. We can use the road – long and laborious – or cross various fields as preferred (the fields were quite muddy when last here but, ever the optimist, they may be pleasantly dry now).  
11/11/2018 - AMBLESIDE

B WALK for the 11th November 2018

AMBLESIDE

Leader Peter Rossall

Distance 7½ miles / 12 km

Ascent (total) Approx 1,148ft / 350m

Time 4½-5 hours

Sunset Time 16:18

Map OL7 The English Lakes - south eastern area

Start Grid Ref: NY374041


Hi All,
So pleased to be out with you all again. Got a rough idea of what I wish to do, although because I fancy playing a great deal of the day by ear nothing is set in stone. Here's what I'm loosely proposing.
Pete
PS: Weather wise, things ain't looking too bad. Showers and possibly a little sunshine (at times).
I've decided we'll have an alternative routine to what we usually do when we use Ambleside as a finishing destination. Ambleside itself has lots of uplands around it and, whilst we've often done the same walk - Orrest Head to Ambleside via Troutbeck and Wansfell - this weekend I've decided that we'll have a mooch about on Loughrigg Fell, a fell that has a multitude of ways up, down and across it and, because of that, I propose to have a rough route mapped out although its a hill that lends itself to a little bit of off-the-cuff exploration, hence the reason why the mileage and height gain are approximated.
We'll leave the coach at our usual car park in Ambleside before walking along the pavement towards Clappersgate. Leaving the road here, we start climbing aiming for our first destination of the day, Lily Tarn. From here we'll play it by ear, although I've loosely figured that we'll make our way to Loughrigg Tarn, climb steeply onto Loughriggs summit, descend to the 'Terraces' before heading for the caves.
In spite of my 'planned' route, if at any time a chance occurs to "see where this path goes", we may well take that option. Whatever we do, I'm looking at us having an interesting 5 hour romp on and around one smallish hill.
Weather wise, sunshine and showers are expected so dress accordingly.  
28/10/2018 - CLITHEROE

B WALK for the 28th October 2018

CLITHEROE

Leader Peter Rossall

Distance 10½ miles / 17 km

Ascent (total) 1565ft / 477m

Time 5½-6 hours

Sunset Time 16:44

Map OL41 Forest of Bowland & Ribblesdale

Start Grid Ref: SD751398


Hi All,
After having lots of non-walking Sundays off work during the last three months, I've finally managed to get a walking Sunday off work this weekend. If you've missed me anywhere near as much as I've missed you, I'd be amazed, but pleasantly so. I'm very happy to be back with you, so happy that I've decided that we'll do a walk that could quite easily be classed as an 'A' walk, albeit that it would be considered an easy 'A' walk by our super fit types ...
Hope to see loads of you on Sunday.
Pete
PS: Don't forget, the forecast is for a good clear day, although it could be a bit chilly, so hats, gloves and maybe an extra layer would be worth bringing with you. Also, on the plus side, the clocks go back this Saturday/Sunday so we all get an extra hour in bed.
PPS: Apologies to John if he was planning to do this walk - a walk that I originally did with him many years ago when I was one of the (slower) 'super fit' types - with the proviso that John could take his 'A' walkers along this route at a far greater speed than us 'B' walkers travel.
First things first, I'm delighted to be back with you for the first time since Buttermere in late July, save for an excellent day around Ramsbottom when Les led us expertly. Secondly, many many thanks to all who've taken on the job of arranging and leading walks in my enforced absence, I can't thank you enough although, hopefully, the fact that your routes proved popular should be a source of great satisfaction for a job well done. For my return I've decided to re-do a walk that we last did as a joint 'A' and 'B' group - owing to John being unavailable on that day - in January 2013. It takes on the big hill - Pendle - and its length makes it very definitely an 'A' walk, albeit that its not the most strenuous that our 'A' walkers would ever do, so defintely one that us 'B' walk strollers can do (at our own pace). There's always the possibility that John being with us this weekend may well decide to do the same (or a very similar) walk in which case those in our club with 'Billy Whizz' tendencies can leave us for dust (and they will).
We alight from the coach on the A59 south east of Clitheroe opposite the minor road that leads to Pendleton. After passing through the village, we leave the tarmac as we head for Wymondhouses and the Nick of Pendle.
Ever upwards from here as we cross Apronfull Hill and Black Hill on our way to Ogden Clough, which we follow before one final ascent up to the summit of Pendle Hill (1827ft/557m) our high spot for the day. We leave the summit by initially heading due north on our way towards Pendle Road, passing to the east of the Hookcliffe plantation just prior to meeting the road.
After a short while we leave the road as we head to Barkerfield where we turn north-west towards Worsaw Hill (which we're not climbing), instead following Worston Brook westwards. This brings us to the village of Worston where we reacquaint ourselves with the A59. To save us having to cross this busy road a path goes under the road and is quickly followed by us crossing the A671 as we reach the outskirts of Clitheroe. Our coach should be located by the Railway Station. Hopefully if we've not dawdled too much, we'll have time to enjoy the local hostelries which are relatively close.  
16/9/2018 - ULDALE

B WALK for the 16th September 2018

ULDALE

Leader Graham Page

Distance 9 miles / 14.5 km

Ascent (total) 1,260ft / 384m

Time 5 hours

Sunset Time 19:27

Map OL4 The English Lakes (North western area)

Start Grid Ref: NY250370


Hi All,
Bit late this, but the weather now looks like it's picking up, with a forecast of constant deluge, now turned to what could be a mainly dry, as well as enjoyable day in the North Lakes.
Looking forward to Peter coming too, hopefully, after unavoidably missing a few times recently.
Regards,
Graham
For those that like to end up in a Lakeland destination with a range of facilities, this is not the best walk for you. Uldale is without a church, school, or a single shop - it is a hamlet, rather than a small village. There is one pub, but that doesn't open until 6.30pm. The population of the whole parish was 458 according to the last Census - but that also includes Snittlegarth and Bewaldeth, as well as the main village of Ireby. So Uldale doesn't amount to very much at all.
There are good things about Uldale though. For a start, Mark, the landlord of the Snooty Fox, which dates from 1624, has agreed we can park the coach and, just especially for us, will open the pub early on Sunday. Secondly, Mae's Gallery in the old school, which closed about ten years ago, is one of the nicest tearooms in the whole of the Lakes.
Finally, today's walk across the summits of three Northern Fells, set out below, is right on its doorstep. Weather permitting, the valley views, and excellent vistas across the Solway Firth to Scotland will command attention, as much as the fells themselves.
Starting from the Snooty Fox, we go past Mae's tearooms, and walk for about half a mile along a narrow lane to Stanthwaite Bridge. We continue across fields to the Chapelhouse reservoir, where we cross the bridge, and continue along a bridleway into Longlands. The main part of the outward walk then commences, as we follow the infant River Ellen and very gradually ascend around 600 ft along the ever-narrowing valley, until it reaches the strange, natural cutting, at the pass of Trusmadoor.
From here begins much the steepest ascent of the day (around 400 feet) alongside and above Burntod Gill to the circular wall shelter on Meal Fell (1,770 ft), the first of three main summits on our walk (with a meal on Meal the aim). A second still steep, but far from insurmountable ascent of 460 ft quickly follows to Great Sca Fell (2,131 ft). The reward for our efforts is then a leisurely traverse across the attractive subsidiary summit of Little Sca Fell and grassy hump of Lowthwaite Fell to our final summit of the day, Longlands Fell (1,580 ft).
From here all that is left is to stroll back down the grassy slopes to Longlands and onwards to Uldale, where the coach (and Snooty Fox) lie in wait.  
19/8/2018 - GLENRIDDING

B WALKS for the 19th August 2018


Good morning all,
as some of you who read my ramblings on our facebook page may already be aware, I was confident that I'd be back with you after missing out last time although, sadly, I discovered yesterday that I'm required to work again this Sunday.
What this means is that yet again I require one or more of you good folk to come forward and offer to lead a walk suitable for the 'B' group. So confident was I that I'd be with you that I'd already decided on two walks - one high level (which was to be my preferred choice) and one low level in case the weather was not good - and I've attached those below.as some of you who read my ramblings on our facebook page may already be aware, I was confident that I'd be back with you after missing out last time although, sadly, I discovered yesterday that I'm required to work again this Sunday. Obviously the fact that I'm not going to be with you means that whoever very kindly decides to lead the 'B' walk in my absence does not have to choose either of the options that I'd planned and has licence to do their own thing. The area has plenty of scope for suitable walks.
If anyone wishes to take-on-the-job but doesn't have a map, don't worry, as I'll send a copy of both of the walks that I had planned, together with a map, on the coach.
Sorry that I can't be with you again, hopefully next time (once the kids summer holidays, and with it my own work colleagues' holidays have finished) I'll be back with you.
Pete
Higher level option

GLENRIDDING via KIRKSTONE PASS

Leader Peter Rossall

Distance 8 miles / 12¾ km

Ascent (total) 1,260ft / 384m

Time 5½ hours

Sunset Time 20:36

Maps OL7 / OL5 (the English Lakes – south eastern / north eastern areas

Start Grid Ref: NY401081


Todays walk takes us onto the high fells but, and there’s always a but, the saving grace is that because we’re starting from the top of the Kirkstone Pass, the uphill bits are 1000ft less than the downhill bits, with the last half being a very easy walk through the valley.
Having alighted from the coach at the Kirkstone Pass Inn (at 1492 feet above sea level), we start climbing straight away, steeply at first to reach and cross St Raven’s Edge before the gradient eases, whilst still heading skywards, and we eventually reach John Bell's Banner where no banner awaits us. This is Caudale Moor - don't you just hate these fells that seemingly have two names? - and the last time we were here we headed off on the north west ridge towards Brothers Water. Today though we'll continue eastwards for a further mile to pass Stony Cove Pike before descending steeply to Threshthwaite Mouth.
A further stiff climb awaits anyone looking to reach Thornthwaite Crag and its fantastic beacon but, for us we're departing stage left down into Threshthwaite Cove. A long descent, that includes a couple of small rises, sees us follow Pasture Beck through the quaintly named past your bottom valley! ... Oh sorry, that should have read Pasture Bottom, silly me.
Eventually we reach the village of Hartsop and all that left is an easy walk along the well used valley path towards Side Farm where we turn to reach the A592 road. A half mile stretch of pavement walking follows bringing us to the end of, hopefully, another good days walking.


Lower level option

GLENRIDDING to POOLEY BRIDGE via AIRA FORCE

Leader Peter Rossall

Distance 9.25 miles / 15km

Ascent (total) 810ft / 247m

Time 5½ to 6 hours

Sunset Time 20:36

Map OL5 (the English Lakes – north eastern areas

Start Grid Ref: NY386172


This walk matches one that was last done a couple of years ago. It's not the walk that I have as my 1st choice for this weekend but, just in case we get a poor day weatherwise, it proved very popular two years ago and I feel that it would make a suitable substitute were it to be required.
Having enjoyed the ride over the Kirkstone Pass, we’ll commence our walk from Glenridding and enjoy a leisurely walk along the shoreline of Ullswater for about a mile and a half before we head uphill to view the wonderful Aira Force waterfall.
Weather permitting we’ll have a morning stop here (you’ll want to take pictures you see, so having a break makes perfect sense) before we head away from the falls and gently uphill, with views across and along Ullswater becoming enhanced as we get higher. Down below us should be Lyulphs Tower, supposedly visited often by William Wordsworth, with this area being recognised as the inspiration for probably his best known poem*.
Continuing along the ‘balcony’ footpath of Gowbarrow Fell we pass through Swinburn’s Wood and below Priest’s Crag before arriving at the quaint little village of Bennethead (passing through here with John’s ‘A’ group many years ago we encountered a red squirrel, so keep your eyes peeled).
Leaving the village we take to field paths again, passing close by Maiden Castle (not much of a castle actually!) before being deposited in a caravan park! A couple of fields sees us back to the main A592 road, the road that we started from, just by the turn off to Pooley Bridge and half a mile later we finish in Pooley Bridge itself, a place I’ve never been to, although I believe that it’s lovely.

*Wordsworth poem, I’m sure you all know it.
I wandered lonely as a cloud,
That floats on high o’er vales and hills,
When all at once I saw a crowd,
A host of golden daffodils,
Beside the lake, beneath the trees,
Fluttering and dancing in the breeze.
 
5/8/2018 - PEN-Y-GHENT

B WALK for the 5th August 2018

PEN-Y-GHENT

Leader Peter Rossall

Distance 6.5 miles / 10.5 km

Ascent (total) 1,656ft / 505 m

Time 5 hours

Sunset Time 21:04

Map OL2 Yorkshire Dales

Start Grid Ref: SD808725


Good afternoon everyone,
As those of you who have reference to the Wyre Ramblers facebook page may be aware, I'm unavailable this weekend due to work commitments, and a minor injury, although thankfully that's improving daily.
My non availability means that we require one of you good folk to step forward and offer to lead the 'B' group in my absence. This is a copy of the walk that I had planned to do, although if anyone wishes to do a different walk that is suitable for the 'B' group I, and I'm certain the rest-of-the-gang, would be more than happy to follow like sheep ... just like they always do!
Enjoy your day, whatever you do, and remember that I'll be missing you far more than you'll be missing me.
Pete.
PS: Just to add insult to injury (for me), the weather for this weekend is looking good for Pen-y-ghent. Warm and dry with sunny intervals. A gentle breeze and very good viewing conditions. Just what I needed to know (Grrr).
Sadly work commitments prevent me from joining you all today, hence the reason why your 'leader' has been described as "Whoever fancies it". In all fairness this walk is relatively easy to navigate and should not cause any great problems. Unlike our 'B' walk of a fortnight ago, it is suitable for everybody to undertake although, as is always the case, we all go uphill, or downhill, at different speeds, so show respect to all in the group by being aware of where everyone is at all times. Enjoy your day.
Starting from the car park in Horton where toilet facilities are available, we turn right to follow the road through the village, passing the Pen-y-ghent Cafe, the Golden Lion pub and St. Oswalds Church before crossing the beck of Douk Ghyll and following the minor road that leads to Brackenbottom. We leave the tarmac and follow a well defined and well maintained path as it heads gently uphill, with our ultimate goal of Pen-y-ghent directly ahead.
A number of wooden and stone stiles are negotiated as we head steadily uphill. Climbing over a twin stile, we join the Pennine Way where we turn sharply left. A short but quite steep stepped climb follows, complete with a couple of easy scrambles, with us eventually reaching the summit trig point where lunch can be enjoyed whilst you take in the wonderful views of Whernside (to the north west) and Ingleborough (west) with Fountains Fell to the south east of us.
From the trig point, we continue northerly over another twin stile before heading downhill along a rocky but well defined path, which we leave via a sharp left turn, leading us past Hunt Pot and, with a slight detour, the gaping chasm of Hull Pot, before following the ‘green lane’ of Holbeck Scar Lane back to Horton.

As this will be the third consecutive time that I've been prevented from enjoying this hill (twice by heavy snow, and this time by work commitments), I hope that you've had a wonderful walk on a hill that seems cursed where I'm concerned.   
22/7/2018 - BUTTERMERE

B WALK for the 22nd July 2018

BUTTERMERE

Leader Peter Rossall

Distance 7.75 miles / 12.5 km

Ascent (total) 1,791ft / 546m

Time 6 hours

Sunset Time 21:30

Map OL4 - The English Lakes - North-western area

Start Grid Ref: NY175170


Hi all,
apologies for the lateness of this info. Blame it on the golf!
It appears that tomorrow at least we'll not have to endure any of these very hot temperatures and wall-to-wall sunshine that we've had to deal with over our last six walks ... just think, the last time we saw any mud was when we went to Castleton in mid April. That said, the forecast for tomorrow is not bad, just not what we've become accustomed to recently.
The temperature wiill still be pleasantly warm, with a gentle breeze and the possibility of a little light drizzle - although we may get none - but with cloud cover rather than sunshine.
For the walk, we'll be doing Fleetwith Pike via the infamous Fleetwith Edge. We may, or more likely some of us may, also tack on Haystacks as well. We'll see how we're going for time.
Usual pick ups rather than a single pick up.
See you all tomorrow.
Pete.
Back to an old favourite of mine today, the wonderful but unrelenting slog that is Fleetwith Edge. It includes a little bit of mild scrambling and entails almost all of the 1,791ft height gain that we have to complete today. On the plus side, the walk to the base of the climb, together with the walk back to Buttermere village, is very picturesque ... and easy. Currently my plan is to use the eastern side of Buttermere (lake) to reach Gatesgarth prior to climbing to Fleetwith Pike via Fleetwith Edge. I plan to return to Gatesgarth via Warnscale Beck although there is an alternative that could see us include the climb onto Haystacks as well. Time constraints may prevent us doing that. The length of time taken for ALL THE GROUP to reach the summit may prove prohibitive to summit both fells, however, if any of our quicker walkers fancy doing both, I'd be quite happy to let them. Obviously, mountain etiquette dictates that those - if any - who choose to include Haystacks would leave word for the slower members of our pack - a pack that is likely to include myself as I lead from the back - of their plans, and numbers.
Having reached Buttermere sometime in the late morning we'll look to get moving fairly sharpish once the requisite toilet visits have been made. We'll pass through Syke Farm on our way to Buttermere's shoreline. A lovely walk ensues bringing us to the foot of Fleetwith Edge. Its fair to say that the knife edge facade inspires some and frightens others, although whichever emotion it induces, the appearance of it is quite magnificent.
Soon you'll be at the top and the views are superb, and certainly worthy of the effort required to get there. Lunch consumed, we'll head off through the quarries as we look to head back to base. The plan is to turn right into the depression between Fleetwith Pike and Haystacks - although if we've the time, and the inclination - we may decide to include Haystacks as well.
Either way, we'll end up back by Buttermere lake and I propose that we use the opposite shoreline from the one used earlier to see us back to our transport, although first we'll visit the cafe or either, or possibly both, of the pubs that the village has.
8/7/2018 - SNOWDON

B WALK for the 8th July 2018

SNOWDON

Leader Peter Rossall

Distance 8.75 miles / 14 km

Ascent (total) 3,074ft / 937m

Time 7 hours

Sunset Time 21:42

Map OL17 Snowdon / Yr Wyddfa

Start Grid Ref: SH647556


Hi all,
Snowdonia, a long trip and a place where we normally get anything from a dry, blustery day, to a very soggy one. This year it seems different ... even to the point where once we reach Snowdon's summit (which is usually very windy), the Mountain Weather Information Service forecasters are predicting that the summits in Snowdonia will 'suffer' no more than a wind that is variable - 5 to 10mph or less (I like that) - with the effect of the wind on walkers being negligible.
Looks like our only problem may be sunstroke once again ..., oh and a flaming big hill to climb ..., and no pub at the end ..., and a long journey ... what's not to like?.
Most of you are probably aware by now that John is taking on a walk that is shorter than what the 'B' group will be doing. That said, his walk is far more strenuous, exhilarating and a little bit scarier in parts than ours will be. Feel free to join him for a thoroughly enjoyable day that will have you beaming by the end of it.
For those who don't fancy knife edges, here's what I've got for you.
PS: Don't forget, single pick up at 8am at Four Lane Ends, and bring plenty of liquid because it could be a warm one.
Pete.
In my time as 'B' group leader - a spell that started in October 2008 - we've never reached a higher elevation than we will today. That said, on the two previous occasions when we've 'topped out' on Snowdon's summit, we've reached it by following the Pyg track from Pen-y-Pass, meaning a climb of just over 2,500ft.
Today I propose to take you up the Llanberis path, a path that loosely follows the route taken by the Mountain Railway, a railway that transports those less able than us to the highest point in either England or Wales. We're better than that - aren't we? - so there'll be no cheating by us as we're hardcore!
Like most things in life, the Llanberis path has good and bad aspects. On the minus side its the longest route - at 5 miles - to reach the summit. It also tends to be very busy, that said, for busy, wait until we reach the top. On the plus side, the views are supposed to be superb and, although its the longest ascent, its also acknowledged as the easiest!
Now then, so as to not to confuse anybody, 'easiest path' to Snowdon's summit does not mean easy ..., it just means easier than any of the others. You'll have 3,074ft to climb - almost 600ft more than by taking the Pyg track - so, you have been warned.
To ensure that you don't miss out on the Pyg track altogether, I plan to descend along that path, thereby finishing at Pen-y-pass where we'll reacquaint ourselves with our coach. The one major problem with this route is that where we finish does not have a pub, although there is a cafe and toilet facilities. A pub is available about a mile away, although that includes walking steeply down a busy road. Time constraints may mean that we don't have time for a 'jog to the pub', although if we really want a drink, maybe we can 'jog' the whole walk ... I can't see many agreeing to that.

Finally, with the promise of another wonderful day weatherwise, unlike some of the fells that we climb in the Lakes, or Derbyshire, or Yorkshire, Snowdon is a ‘proper’ mountain and warrants appropriate respect. Based on what's expected, we probably won't require gloves or hats, but ... they don't take up much room in your rucksacks and its always better to have them and not need them than the other way around. More pertinently, plenty of liquid may be more important to keep you hydrated.

24/6/2018 - BORROWDALE

B WALK for the 24th June 2018

BORROWDALE (via the M6)

Leader Peter Rossall

Distance 9.25 Miles / 15 km

Ascent (total) 2015ft / 614m

Time 6½ hours

Sunset Time 21:54

Map OL4 The English Lakes (north western area)

Start Grid Ref: NY263235


Evening all,
Once again it appears that we're going to be blessed with good weather, just as we've had in the Langdales, Ilkley, Ennerdale, The Roaches and now Borrowdale, when will it all end? ... probably next time in Snowdonia.
Although John and Linda won't be with us, John has booked the coach into the Glaramara Hotel and Outdoor Centre - our trips to Seatoller have been curtailed recently because of a lack of a place to finish, hopefully this place will serve us well. Anyone wishing to finish their day in Keswick, that facility is still available as we have to come back through the town on our way out, that said, obviously having booked the coach into the Glaramara, it wouldn't be good order for lots of us not to use its facilities.
Here's what I'm planning for the 'B' group, a walk that offers the chance to go over or around Catbells, and also the opportunity to opt to climb Castle Crag or to avoid it.
For those not on holiday, or watching England in the World Cup, here's what I've got for you.
Pete.
So then, Borrowdale, a lovely part of the Lake District but an area that we've not actually been to for the last two years ... a statement that's not strictly acurate as we've still been here, albeit that we've tended to start in Borrowdale and finish in Keswick owing to the better facilities - both parking and refreshments - that Keswick offers. This year we've pre-booked coach parking at the Glaramara Hotel and Outdoor Activity Centre close to Seatoller, although the possibility of finishing in Keswick still exists for anyone who'd prefer that. As for our 'B' walk, we'll be finishing where our coach will be.
We begin from the Booths car park in Keswick and follow our usual route across the wobbly bridge to Portinscale as we head for the foot of Catbells. Decision time here: I'd originally considered following the lower path (for the first time ever) that hogs the eastern flank of Catbells but then thought that you'd all be disappointed with that. The possibility remains for any of you to forego climbing up and across Skelghyll Bank and Catbells by using the lower path if preferred*.
Those of us who choose to attain some height will follow the usual (very busy) ridge path to Catbells' summit before turning left at Hause Gate to head back down into the valley. Once down in the valley we'll pick up the Cumbria Way close to Grange and we'll use this until we reach the river Derwent at Gowder Dub. Here we'll turn right to head up the bridleway that follows Broadslack Gill, eventually depositing us at the foot of the short, sharp, steep climb that sees us ascend to Castle Crag's summit. If you've never been here, it's well worth the effort.
Leaving Castle Crag, rather than heading back to the bridleway, we'll turn left and head down towards the river once more for a gentle end to our day as we follow the river southwards. Ignoring the bridge (and the stepping stones) that take you to Rosthwaite, we'll keep the river on our left and, shortly after passing by the Borrowdale Youth Hostel we'll get the opportunity to use the chain rope (a sort of low level Via Ferrata) to transfer across some rock slabs.
We eventually end up in the National Trust car park at Seatoller and another 400 yards of road walking takes us to the Glaramara where our coach will be.
* Todays walk has two distinct ascents - 1120ft/341m to Catbells' summit, and 650ft/199m from the river to Castle Crag. Taking the lower path around Catbells cuts your overall climbing by about 950ft.
10/6/2018 - THE ROACHES

B WALK for the 10th June 2018

THE ROACHES

Leader Peter Rossall

Distance 8 miles / 12.8 km

Ascent (total) 1115 ft/340m

Time 5½ hours

Sunset Time 21:33

Map OL24 The Peak District (White Peak area)

Start Grid Ref: SJ994604


Morning all,
Isn't this nice weather that we're experiencing lovely?, surely it can't carry on can it?, and, no doubt when it does finally break it'll coincide with one of our walking weekends! ... thankfully this weekend is not that day as the weather is set fair for warm temperatures and light winds for the area we'll be in on Sunday.
It's not an area that we visit regularly - this will be my fourth visit in 15 years with this club - but for those who've never been, it is very pleasant, and I'm sure that those who have visited previously would attest to that view.
We'll be on the very south western edge of the Peak District, an area of high ground and valleys that sits almost entirely in Derbyshire although the Roaches are actually just over the border in Staffordshire. Nice weather, nice area, you'll love it.
See ya on Sunday,
Pete
PS : Don't forget that we're on another single pick-up from Four Lane Ends, Thornton (free parking available behind the Thornton Little Theatre) at 8am, always providing that the coach driver is aware of that fact!.
Today I’m planning to mirror the walk we did four years ago. It includes a couple of relatively easy ascents together with a little bit too much ‘road work’, but I’ll be looking to leave the tarmac as often as possible on what will be one of our less strenuous walks of the year, although I sincerely hope that you find it no less interesting for that.

We begin our walk from the car park at Tittesworth Water (Reservoir) where a Visitor Centre and public conveniences are available. Heading back to the road we turn right to make our way to "Whitty Lane" which we’ll follow to Upper Hulme where we meet the minor road that runs beneath The Roaches.
Turning left we follow the road for a short distance prior to following the good path that takes us up onto Hen Cloud. To the north of us is the escarpment of The Roaches which we’ll be on shortly. Firstly though we have to lose height from Hen Cloud and, rather than heading directly onto 'The Roaches', I plan to take us via the Don Whillans Hut [1] (or "Rock Hall" as it’s also known) before climbing onto the Roaches ridge a little later.
Once the ridge is attained, easy walking ensues – possibly with lots of ‘tourists’ – as we pass Doxey Pool [2] and hopefully get a glimpse (and maybe some pictures) of rock climbers scrambling up the rocks that form The Roaches. Continuing on we’ll pass the trig point (at 1656ft/505mtrs, our highest point today) before descending past the Bearstone Rock to reacquaint ourselves with the minor road we left by Hen Cloud.
All downhill from here, beginning with a stretch of road walking before taking to paths that pass by Roach Side Farm and Rose Cottage as we head back towards Tittesworth Water. As we reach Meerbrook, we’ll pass the Lazy Trout pub and, because we’re only half a mile away from where the coach is, we’ll stop here for refreshments, the location of this pub being why I’d chosen to do the walk this way around.
[1] Over 30 years after his death, Don Whillans remains one of Britains foremost climbers and mountaineers. A contempory of Joe Brown and Sir Chris Bonnington, the Don Whillans (memorial) hut is wonderfully set in amongst the rocks and can be hired by British Mountaineering Club (BMC) members. We'll walk by it, although to my knowledge, we're not allowed to get too close.
[2] Doxey Pool is a small pond, measuring about 15 by 10 metres (49 by 33 ft) close to the top path of The Roaches. Legend has it that this pool is inhabited by a mermaid called Jenny Greenteeth, known as the blue nymph. The legend says that she fell in the pool on a foggy day whilst walking along the top of the Roaches, and ever since has been enticing unsuspecting victims down to the pool and to their watery grave.
27/5/2018 - ENNERDALE BRIDGE

B WALK for the 27th May 2018

ENNERDALE BRIDGE

Leader Peter Rossall

Distance 9¼ miles / 15 km

Ascent (total) Negligible (approx 100ft / 31m)

Time 5½ hours

Sunset Time 21:31

Map OL4 The English Lakes – north western area

Start Grid Ref: NY070159


Hi everyone,
A bank holiday weekend with good weather! ... which means that thanks should be given to those folk who attended our AGM in October last year and put forward the proposition that we visit Ennerdale again, even though our first trip here (last August) was a bit of a washout.
We've no John this week and I believe that Les Holt is to lead an 'A' walk. For the 'B' group I've decided that we'll have an easy day. The area lends itself to any of you who don't fancy what Les or me have to offer "doing your own thing".
Looking forward to a good day.
PS: Don't forget, we're on a single pick-up / drop-off from Four Lane Ends at Thornton at 8am. Parking is available in the free car park behind the Little Theatre.
See you tomorrow.
Pete
Ten months on from our clubs first ever visit to this part of the Lake District and we're back once again, hoping for a better day weather wise than we had in early August last year. Despite the fact that we had one of those appalling days that the Lake District can throw at you now and then - thankfully we don't suffer many that bad - the area proved very popular and, when during our AGM late last year it was proposed that we visit it again this year, it was voted for unamimously. Thankfully this year we've got good weather so we should see it in all its glory. As a 'B' group I'm intending to copy the walk we did last year, albeit that we'll go clockwise around Ennerdale Water which is the opposite of what we did last year. That means its a very undemanding walk physically, although there's scope for any individuals - or possibly all of us as a group - to add a few more ups and downs if we feel up to it. An easy walk in glorious surroundings, one to be enjoyed.
After a long trip to Ennerdale Bridge, we begin from the village taking the road heading due east to pass by Lily Hall before arriving at the weir at the western end of Ennerdale Water. Turning left here we'll folllow the lakeside path, passing beneath Bowness Knott as we head to the far end of the lake where we'll turn for home.
Following the southern shore of the lake, we'll include a little scramble as we cross Anglers Crag before we reacquaint ourselves with the road at the strangely named Grike, followed by a short walk down the road back to Ennerdale Bridge.
Wikipaedia tells me that in the census of 2011 Ennerdale Bridge had a population of 220 ... for those walkers of ours who prefer a Cafe to a pub I think I'm correct in saying that no Cafe exists, however, I'm sure that either of the two local pubs - the Fox & Hounds and the Shepherds Arms Hotel - will certainly sell teas and coffees, though whether they serve cakes as well I couldn't say.
13/5/2018 - ILKLEY

B WALK for the 13th May 2018

ILKLEY

Leader Peter Rossall

Distance 9 miles / 14.5 km

Ascent (total) 1063ft / 324m

Time 5 hours 30 mins

Sunset Time 21:00

Map 297 Lower Wharfedale & Washburn Valley

Start Grid Ref: SE115480


Evenin' all,
According to the forecast for Ilkley Moor on Sunday that I've just looked at, it appears that we'll get OK weather, not great, but not bad either. Whatever the weather has in store for us won't bother us because it never does, so here's what the 'B' group will be doing. See you all on Sunday,
Pete.
Mid May, so that can only mean one place ... Ilkley and/or Otley. OK, I'm aware that that's two places but, because they sit cheek-by-jowl with one another, they're almost joined at the hip. Having walked between the two towns previously, this year we'll be doing a circular walk centred on Ilkley only. This year also marks our third consecutive visit to this area, and all on the same weekend, having seemingly discarded it for the previous six years prior to our visit in 2016 so, it must have something to offer?, and it does. My problem was attempting to find a route that we had not used before whilst retaining those parts that make this area so pleasing and I think I've done that, although I'll let you be the judges. It's considerably easier than either of our two previous outings, both of which were bordering on 'A' standard walks. Hope you enjoy it.
Beginning from our usual coach parking spot overlooking the Riverside Gardens park, we'll head towards the bridge, which we'll pass under, before climbing the steps to the road to cross the river Wharfe. Once across the river we'll follow the route that we've often taken to bring us into Ilkley, passing by the Lido and Swimming Pool as we head into Coppy Wood, a favourite with everyone for the carpet of Bluebells that abound at this time of year.
Once out of the wood we reach a road and turn left to explore new territory in this often visited location. A combination of minor roads and bridleways brings us to High Austby Farm from where we begin our descent back down into the valley. A little more tarmac bashing is required as we pass through Nesfield on our way to the suspension bridge that we'll use to re-cross the Wharfe at Addingham.
We stick to the outer edges of the village before crossing carefully the very busy A65 road as we begin our ascent onto Rombalds Moor. Our target is The Millennium Way path and, once this is reached we turn left (eastwards) and traverse an airy, yet very level, path that takes us onto Ilkley Moor and sees us pass the Swastika Stone on our way towards White Wells (a place that we visited during our visit to Ilkley last year) before heading steeply downhill to finish our walk in Ilkley's fine town, a town centre that affords us umpteen refreshment possibilities.
29/4/2018 - LANGDALES

B WALK for the 29th April 2018

LANGDALES

Leader Peter Rossall

Distance 6½ miles / 10.25 km

Ascent (total) 2260ft / 689m

Time 5 hours 15 mins

Sunset Time 20:42

Map OL6 The English Lakes - South western area

Start Grid Ref: SE115480


Mornin' all,
Sunday's 'B' walk is gonna be a biggie! ..., well by 'B' standards it will be. Only short but quite tough. Weather is a little uncertain as its still a bit too early to say for definite what we'll get. There may be a little rain and/or snow although that may have turned up during Saturday night leaving Sunday better. Another 24 hours should help to clarify things.
As for the walk itself, below is what I'm proposing to do. That said, if the weather takes a turn for the worse, because its a circular walk the route can be reversed if that would be more suitable although as always, my general conservatism may lead me to cancel either of those options and opt for something more low level - probably Lingmoor, which is always a nice option - although hopefully I'll have no need for that.
See you on Sunday.
Pete.
Following our relatively tough walk - by 'B' group standards - in the Peak District last time out, we're straying into (almost) 'A' group territory once again today with a shorter, but more strenuous, walk that sees us tackle two of the Langdale Pikes. Dependent on what you read, or who you listen to, determines how many 'Pikes' there are - three is the popular number (Harrison Stickle, Loft Crag and Pike of Stickle) although some people also add Pavey Ark and Thorn Crag to the list. What this walk gives us is a strenuous climb to reach the high peaks followed by a couple of smaller ascents, and a bit of scrambling, before we 'head for home' via the long - but very flat - Mickleden. It may be more strenuous than we're used to but it'll be well worth the effort. Enjoy it.
We begin our walk from the car park by Stickle Barn where toilet facilities are available. Heading out of the car parks rear entrance we initially use the Stickle Ghyll path that were we to follow it would take us Stickle Tarn however, we'll turn left off this path and take the Cumbria Way before leaving it to head steeply, and unrelentingly uphill, for just shy of 2,000ft, passing by various waterfalls tumbling down Dungeon Ghyll. Eventually we'll reach out first target of Loft Crag.
A short traverse between Loft Crag and Pike o' Stickle sees us lose 130ft before climbing a further 200ft to the dome shaped summit of Pike o' Stickle, and here's where we include a little scrambling. Hopefully we've got good viewing conditions because the vista from here is pretty spectacular. Although it may have taken us quite some time and effort to get here, incredibly we've actually travelled less than 2 miles since we started.
Leaving the Pike, we cross Martcrag Moor to rejoin the Cumbria Way at the top of the Stake Pass and we'll turn left (south west) to follow the 'Way' steeply down into Mickleden via Stake Gill. Once the valley floor is reached, a very flat mile and a half folllows with the summits where you were earlier in the day towering above you on your left and, you've every right to feel pleased with yourselves as you view them.
The Old Dungeon Ghyll Hotel is passed - some of you may want, or even need, to go in - and who am I to stop anyone? ... and a further mile along the Cumbria Way brings us back to the car park from where we began.
15/4/2018 - CASTLETON

B WALK for the 15th April 2018

CASTLETON

Leader Peter Rossall

Distance 8½ miles / 13.75 km

Ascent (total) 1657ft / 505m

Time 5 hours 45 mins

Sunset Time 20:07

Map OL1 The Peak District – Dark Peak area

Start Grid Ref: SK149830


Good evening everyone,
Some of you may already be aware (via facebook) of what I've got planned for this weekend for the 'B' group. I've opted to forego completing the whole length of the 'Great Ridge' this time, not because it isn't great, but simply because we've done it a number of times previously. Instead I've tried to formulate a route that uses part of the ridge whilst utilising parts of the Edale/Castleton area that we've - or at least myself - have not previously used.
In order to do this, I studied my map to get what I considered to be a suitable route. Furthermore I actually took a trip to Edale during a day off this week to check its suitability. I'm glad I did because the route that I proposed to use to return us to Castleton from Hollins Cross proved to be very unsuitable so, because of that, we'll be using the same route for that part of the walk that we used to reach Hollins Cross earlier in the walk.
With regards to the weather, it's supposed to be OK. A little bit breezy but with the rain (forecasted for the evening) hopefully holding off until then. Those who've read my facebook posts will be aware that there's a little bit of mud to contend with but, that's what walking in the hills is all about ... isn't it?.
Hope to see lots of you on Sunday, here's a detailed description of what I've got.
Pete.
After yet another 'guest' leader last time out - thanks Graham for a great day - were back in an area that I know and love this week. Furthermore, it's an area that lends itself to one walk in particular, namely the Great Ridge, a fantastic high level traverse between Mam Tor and Lose Hill that is hard to ever become bored with. However, because we've done this ridge on various occasions, and in both directions, previously, I've tried to introduce a little variety into today's walk. Whether I've managed that is very much within the eye of the beholder ... hopefully you'll like what I've decided on.
We begin our walk from the car park in Castleton where toilet facilities are available. Heading out of the car parks rear entrance will bring us to Mill Bridge where we turn left and head up the Hollowford Road. This bit of tarmac rises at a steady gradient and is the beginning of a 475ft ascent. As we leave the road, the steepness increases considerably although on the plus side, the stiff incline takes us quickly to our first 'high point' of the day at Hollins Cross (the lowest point on the Great Ridge). Dependent on the weather, we may have an 'elevenses' stop here.
We'll be returning to this point later on, but for now we're due to lose all the height that we've gained as we descend into the Edale valley where we may well find a little bit of mud - err correction, we'll definitely find quite a lot of mud. Having negotiated some muddy areas (with ease), we'll eventually arrive by a road at Barber Booth. A minor road directly ahead leads us to our next ascent, an ascent that sees us rise 974ft, albeit that some steeper sections are mixed with lots of flat bits (well not flat, but not steep!) as we cross Rushup Edge, with Lord's Seat (at 540m / 1,771ft) being our highest point today.
Almost done, but first we lose 280ft of height, crossing the road at Mam Nick before climbing steeply for a further 200ft to reach the summit of Mam Tor. All that's left now is to follow the paved path down to Hollins Cross before following the path that we used earlier today to reaquaint ourselves with Castleton.
1/4/2018 - COCKERMOUTH

B WALK for the 1st April 2018

COCKERMOUTH

Leader Graham Page

Distance 10¾ miles / 17 km

Ascent (total) 1,500ft / 550m

Time 6 hours

Sunset Time 19:50

Map OL4 The English Lakes (north western area)

Start Grid Ref: NY199307


Mornin' everyone,
For anyone who's not read my post on our Wyre Ramblers facebook page earlier this week, this Sunday will be the third time on the trot that our 'B' walk in the Lake District will be lead by someone other than myself. The two previous occasions were due to my absence however, on this weekend, I'll be out with you and I'm delighted to hand over the responsibility for this weekends walk to Graham Page as we're in an area that he knows far better than I do.
Graham has forwarded me not just details of his walk - which looks very good - but also a little supplementary information relating to our destination town of Cockermouth ... I hope you all enjoy Graham's very detailed research and description although please can I request that you don't begin to expect this from me because its unlikely to happen!
I know that I don't have to say this but, just as you've done whenever John Thompson, Les Holt, David Wood, Steve Simpson or David Clegg have stepped in - often at short notice - to lead whenever John or myself have been unavailable, please give Graham the respect that he deserves for ensuring that we have an enjoyable day.
Here's what Graham has planned for the 'B' group.
See you all on Sunday,
Pete.
Today's walk begins at the Pheasant Inn alongside the only real "Lake" in the Lake District, Bassenthwaite, taking in the top of Sale Fell and the flank of Ling Fell, and descends on field paths to cross the A66. We then regain some height, and throw in a bit of forest walking, before emerging on to the top of Setmurthy Common. From here the grassy, undulating ridge crosses Watch Hill and descends into the historic old Cumberland town of Cockermouth.
Starting from the the A66 slip road by the Pheasant Inn, close to the far end Bassenthwaite Lake, we take the quiet lane immediately behind the Inn to warm up for our ascent, our main ascent of the day at 900 feet. We leave the lane to go up a grassy terrace, enjoying views back over the lake. Reaching a stone wall beside Wythop Wood, we turn right, to follow it to the top of Sale Fell.
Continuing directly down the opposite side of the fell, a short walk brings us to a second grass terrace across the side of Ling Fell. We than descend from Ling Fell down to Green Lonning and follow the bridleway alongside the beck to St. Cuthbert's Church, and across fields to cross the A66 at Lambfoot.
Next we regain some height via a narrow country lane, followed by a forest walk (which includes a last steep ascent) before suddenly opening out on top of Setmurthy Common. From here its a two mile traverse along a pleasant grass ridge, hopefully with good views across to the Solway Firth and back into a now more distant Lakeland.
Halfway along, Watch Hill, appropriately named, provides good views over Cockermouth, from where all that remains is to descend to the road and follow it into the town. Bridge Street, first on the right after the unmissable white statue of Lord Mayo, leads to a footbridge across the river Derwent, where the coach should be waiting. Alternatively, some of you may choose to head directly to a source of refreshment.

A little further information about our destination and today's walk.

Standing at the confluence of the rivers Cocker and Derwent, the town was devastated by flooding in 2009, and again in 2015. While it has recovered substantially, the impact is still there to be seen. A full 'story of the flood' is told on a 'history wall', down a narrow snicket on Kings Arms Lane, just off Main Street. Wordsworth's birthplace is one of Cockermouth's more noted landmarks, while The Bush on Main Street, The Castle on Market Square and Bitter End on Kirkgate are amongst its more characterful and pleasant hostelries.
The walk, at nearly 11 miles, is long by 'B' group standards, with a combined ascent of 1,500ft. With the extra hour in hand, and with an early main ascent, when there should be a 'spring in our step' and, being largely easy underfoot, it should give time to enjoy Cockermouth too. For real speedsters (if there are any), you could even add 400ft of ascent and an extra half mile if you fancy a quick diversion to take in the top of Ling Fell. For any that don't fancy today's walk, the town is an interesting destination in itself, with riverside walks and a range of shops and facilities, although it being Easter Sunday will no doubt significantly impact on what is open on the day.
Whatever is decided, here's hoping for good weather, good paths and good views, knowing that we will always make the best of it, whatever the day brings.
Graham Page.
18/3/2018 - GRASSINGTON

B WALK for the 18th March 2018

GRASSINGTON

Leader Peter Rossall

Distance 8¾ miles / 14 km

Ascent (total) 817ft / 249m

Time 5¾ hours

Sunset Time 18:17

Map OL2 Yorkshire Dales – southern & western areas

Start Grid Ref: SE002638


Mornin' all,
hope you're all well and looking forward to a cool day in the White Rose county. I say cool because the weather forecast is for us to get another blast of icy weather from the east, although thankfully it's not forecast to be as cold, or problematical, as the "Beast from the East" was just over a fortnight ago.
Personally I'm delighted to be back with you, and details of my proposed 'B' walk follow shortly. Firstly though, I'd like to thank David Wood for stepping forward and offering to lead the 'A' walk as John (and Linda) will be unavailable this weekend.
David has arranged (at relatively short notice) an 11.5 mile circular walk taking you across Conistone Moor to Grimwith Reservoir before returning via Hebden Moor, Burnsall, and the Dales Way path that follows the river Wharfe towards Grassington, a route that also sees you pass Linton falls.
As for us strollers in the 'B' party, here's waht I have planned.
See you on Sunday,
Pete.
Back in this lovely corner of the country for the first time since ... well, as little as two months ago actually when we visited Settle which sits 18km (11 miles) directly to our west. On that day in January we 'enjoyed' some snow - both on the ground and falling from the sky - and it appears that we may have similar conditions this weekend as another "Beast from the East" visits Britain once again. Our last visit to this particular location was a glorious day in September 2015 and I'm planning to do the same walk again although, if the weather is very poor, we can forego heading onto the high ground (which is open moorland and likely to be rather chilly) and use the Dales Way instead, this would reduce the walks length by approximately 2km (1.25miles).
Having used the facilities in the car park at Grassington we’ll make our way down to the river Wharfe before following the riverside path past Ghaistrill’s Strid, a waterfall of sorts. Our path leaves the river and dumps us on a minor road for a short while before we head across a field prior to having to use the road again for a longer stretch, eventually ending up in the delightful village of Conistone.
Turning right here we make for the limestone gorge of Conistone Dib. It’s not quite of Gordale Scar proportions although it’s still an impressive sight. Climbing out of the ‘Dib’ requires a small scramble although its nothing too arduous.
Here's where the conditions determine whether we climb higher or use the Dales Way as it heads back to Grassington on a relatively flat trajectory. If we decide to head uphill, we'll do this via a bridleway (the Bycliffe Road) that is relatively easy.
Leaving the bridleway at its highest point, we turn south and start the journey back to Grassington. We’re on open high Pennine moorland, a place that can pretty unforgiving in the wrong conditions, and we’ll pass by Bare House, a derelict building, before starting our descent back to our destination.
Typical Yorkshire Dales scenery, with many stone walls and Limestone escarpments, should make for a pleasing end to our walk, complete with a selection of fine café’s and pubs to choose from once we reach Grassington.
4/3/2018 - CONISTON

B WALK for the 4th March 2018

CONISTON via Torver

Leader John Thompson

Distance 6 miles / 9.5 km

Ascent (total) 1,312 ft / 400 m

Time 5 hours

Sunset Time 17:54

Map OL7 The English Lakes South-eastern area

Start Grid Ref: SD285945


Hi all,
Sorry its late but, I, and more importantly John Thompson, have been waiting to see what the weather may do. It's neither good nor bad, or certainly nowhere near as bad as its been this week.
As you're probably aware, I can't be with you this week so, once again, JT has stepped into the breach and offered to lead you. Can't thank John enough for putting himself forward.
Here's what he's got planned. Have a great day.
Pete
On the back of this weeks extreme weather conditions, your leader for this walk (John Thompson) has chosen to (sensibly) avoid attempting to reach the summit of the Old Man of Coniston. As a 'B' group, we've reached the summit of this fine mountain once, although sadly we've been denied the opportunity to retrace our steps on numerous occasions (at least three times, and probably four!). One day we will get another chance, of that I'm certain. In choosing not to 'go for the top', John is looking at taking us half way up the mountain before heading for our finish in Coniston.
Our walk starts just out of Torver where the A593 is joined by Scarr Head Lane. Having departed the coach, we head towards Scarr Head campsite prior to making for the Climbing Hut and the narrow bridge that takes us to the opposite side of Torver Beck. Shortly afterwards, the disused quarry that we've visited on many occasions is reached and, weather permitting, this may be a suitable spot to enjoy a morning break.
Continuing uphill, our next target is the Walna Scar road (a bridleway) and we cross this to head further uphill - on a far flatter gradient - across The Cove, bringing us eventually to Goat's Water, which John intends to use as your high spot for the day. Across the water is the imposing bulk of Dow Crag with the Old Man of Coniston towering above you at the rear.
Lunch enjoyed, we return across The Cove to the Walna Scar road where we turn left and head directly to Coniston. Whilst on the Walna Scar we pass by Boo Tarn - blink and you'll miss it - prior to arriving at a car park where we meet a tarmac road. With the exception of a very steep section of road, this bit of your day will be easy and, to add to your enjoyment, it takes you directly past the Sun Inn (often the preferred choice of pub when we're in Coniston) before continuing down the hill to reacquaint ourselves with our transport.

Obviously the general conditions - both the weather on the day and underfoot - may determine that John decides to forego visiting Goat's Water. If that is the case, please accept his decision as he's your leader for the day.

18/2/2018 - KIRKBY LONSDALE

B WALK for the 18th February 2018

KIRKBY LONSDALE (via Sedbergh)

Leader Peter Rossall

Distance 8¾ miles / 14 km

Ascent (total) 1119 ft / 341 m

Time 6 hours

Sunset Time 17:25

Map OL2 (Yorkshire Dales - southern & western areas)

Start Grid Ref: SD623825


Hi all,
Delighted to be back with you this weekend. That said, I must offer a cheery "Thank you" for John Thompson for doing such a splendid job last time when I was unavailable.
This week we're in an area that I'm not overly familiar with and, rather than doing the same walk as we did last time we were here - 2015 - I've opted to go for something more challenging. The weather has gone from looking fairly good for Sunday when I looked at the forecast yesterday to now being told that Sundays weather may be rather damp around lunchtime/early afternoon.
The wind is relatively light so that'll help as we'll be walking into the weather for large parts of the day. C'est la vie.
I've not heard from John as to what he's got for you 'A' group road-runners although I'm sure that it'll be interesting (isn't it always?). I've based my walk on our itinary indicting that we'll be approaching Kirkby Lonsdale from Sedbergh, however, if John was/is planning to start from elsewhere (meaning that we'd not be travelling down the A683) I can use my previously done walk as a substitute, with the start point for that walk being Burton Services on the M6.
Here's what I've got planned, see you all on Sunday.
Following your day out under the guidance of John Thompson last time out - "Thank you John" - you're stuck with me again today. I've tried to do something a little different to what we normally do when we come to this area although we're in an area that I don't know very well, so expect a few mistakes, hopefully JT will be on hand to offer some advice if needed. The profile of the walk indicates that it starts low, climbs gradually to a high point before losing more height than we've gained to finish by where our coach will be parked. A quick hop over Devil's Bridge takes us into the town where cafes and pubs await our custom.
Having travelled through Sedbergh to drop off our 'A' group "hares", we'll leave the coach on the A683 by Barbon Beck Bridge to follow the road into Barbon village. Just after passing the church we'll take the bridleway on the left, crossing the Beck once again and following it eastwards for a couple of miles until we reach the Barbondale Road.
Another short stretch of road walking brings us to the bridleway that takes us to Bullpot Farm prior to another half mile of tarmac before we leave the road to head for Brownthwaite Pike - our high point for the day at 1381ft above sea level - and its literally all down hill from here. Sadly it involves even more road walking although I've attempted to take us off the tarmac wherever possible.
We'll travel along Fellfoot Road (thankfully a bridleway rather than a tarmac road) and pass by Bindloss Farm and Cragg House Farm to arrive on the outskirts of Kirkby Lonsdale.
4/2/2018 - GRASMERE

B WALK for the 4th February 2018

GRASMERE

Leader John Thompson

Distance 8½ miles / 14 km

Ascent (total) 1,463 ft / 446 m

Time 5½ hours

Sunset Time 16:58

Map OL7 The English Lakes – South-eastern area

Start Grid Ref: NY339073


Hi all,
As the majority of you will be aware, I'm unable to be with you this weekend so, in my absence, John Thompson has very kindly offered to lead your walk this Sunday.
Having given John copies of a few walks that the 'B' group have done in the Grasmere area over the 9 years that I've been leading, with the proviso that John could utilise them as a guide although the final decision was left to John as to what he wished to do.
He's come up with a goodie - well I think so anyway - and it's one that matches the walk that as a group we were to undertake in February 2014. Sadly on that day we didn't complete the full walk due to one of those days that Lakeland can throw at you now and then (a day that was as soggy as our trip to Ennerdale last year.....say no more!). We completed most of the walk that day although because of the poor weather, including low cloud cover, a decision was taken once we'd reached Alcock Tarn (where we consumed some damp sandwiches!) not to bother climbing into the cloud to scale Nab Scar in order to see absolutely nothing (this is the 'B' group remember....not our hard-core 'A' walker cousins), so hopefully you'll enjoy a better day weather wise and complete the full circuit.
Having viewed the Mountain Weather Information Service forecast for the Lake District it appears that you may get a little light snow (though its not guaranteed) and relatively light winds that shouldn't cause any great issues, although the temperature (and wind chill) may be around or just under freezing. The ground may have some remnants of earlier snowfall and be frozen in parts so tread warily.
Look after John, because I know that he'll look after you all and have a wonderful day. I look forward to viewing the pictures to see what I've missed.
See you in a fortnight,
Pete.
Having offered any of you the opportunity to lead todays walk in my absence, I'm indebted to John Thompson (and also Steve Simpson) for taking up my challange with John winning the 'job' on the grounds that he was with us a fortnight ago whereas Steve wasn't, meaning that John really was "Johnny on the spot!" and he's decided to take you on a circular walk to Alcock Tarn, a destination that we've visited on a number of occasions previously. I'm absolutely sure that John will prove more than capable and that you'll all have a great day. In lots of ways I wish I was with you but that's not to be. Enjoy it and behave for your 'master'.
Our walk starts from the car park in Grasmere where toilet facilities exist. Rather than heading through the town, we'll take the path across the fields towards the A591 and the Swan Hotel. Once past the Swan our climbing starts in earnest as we head steeply up towards Alcock Tarn. The views up Greenhead Gill are worthy of a second look, and even afford the possibility of a breather ...
Eventually we’ll reach Alcock Tarn, a tarn that sits within an impressive setting. Reaching the southern end of the tarn we'll turn left along an earthen dam before going through a gap in the wall and following a path through the bracken on our second uphill section of our day. This brings us to the cairn at Nab Scar which, dependent on which way your doing it is either the first, or the last, part of the Fairfield Horseshoe, and we should enjoy wonderful views of Rydal Water (where we’ll be shortly) and Windermere.
Having descended steeply and passed through Rydal, we’ll cross the A591 before following the lakeside path by Rydal Water prior to deciding whether to follow the ‘Terraces’ across Loughrigg, with wonderful views over Nab Scar and Grasmere (lake) or alternatively to take the lakeshore path by Grasmere. Either way, once our decision is taken all that’s left is a gentle walk back into Grasmere town itself.
21/1/2018 - SETTLE

B WALK for the 21st January 2018

SETTLE

Leader Peter Rossall

Distance 8¾ miles / 14 km

Ascent (total) 1083ft / 330m

Time 5½ hours

Sunset Time 16:28

Map Yorkshire Dales OL2 southern and western areas

Start Grid Ref: SD819637


Hi all,
Here's some details of what I'm looking at doing on Sunday. Sadly its far too early to have a great deal of confidence in the forecast for Sunday although having looked at what's expected for Settle on Sunday at this present time, it looks like we may get a combination of heavy rain, with the possibility of it developing into snow at times. Hats and gloves at the ready.
See you on Sunday.
Pete.
Today's walk is identical to one that we've done previously - in October 2013 - and its fairly easy and, to give a slight alternative, I plan to do it in reverse to how we've done it previously. It includes a spot that we've visited often to watch Salmon leaping up a waterfall however, we've always been here around October and November and I'm not certain that Salmon leap in January. If they do, that'll be a bonus.
Leaving the car park in Settle we turn left to go under the railway viaduct, turning right immediately afterwards as we head out of Settle. A short section of road walking follows taking us to Langcliffe where we pass a derelict mill, complete with its mill pond, to arrive at a weir where we'll cross the river Ribble prior to following the river upstream for the next mile or so to reach Stainforth Force waterfall. Here we'll have a morning coffee break whilst looking out for some 'leaping' Salmon.
Continuing on, we'll head into Stainforth village where we'll cross Stainforth Beck via some very large stepping stones with our path ahead taking us to our next highlight, the wonderful waterfall of Catrigg Force, set deep in a wooded valley and well worth the little effort that it takes to view it. Next on the agenda are the Jubilee and Victoria Caves and these are reached easily via a bit of bridleway and road walking. We'll have a look around in both caves so don't forget your torches.
Both caves are part of Attermire Scar and the Scar is part of the Craven Fault Line, the same geological feature that created Malham Cove and Gordale Scar which are around 5 miles east of here.
All that's left is to continue south along the path below the scar before turning right on a path that leads directly back to Settle, although I plan to head further south, passing by Sugar Loaf Hill, High Hill Lane, the green lane track of Lambert Lane to eventually arrive by the rear of the Town Hall with our starting point just around the corner. Although a relatively easy stroll today, hopefully the walk will have been interesting enough to still be enjoyable.
Just to reiterate once again that I'll be unavailable for our trip to Grasmere on February 4th so a stand in to lead a suitable 'B' walk is required. Any takers?.
7/1/2018 - KENDAL

B WALK for the 7th January 2018

KENDAL

Leader Peter Rossall

Distance 9 miles / 14½ km

Ascent (total) 522ft / 159m

Time 5½ hours

Sunset Time 16:12

Map OL7 - The English Lakes - South Eastern Area

Start Grid Ref: SD586929


Hi everyone,
Hope you've all had a great Xmas and are raring to get back 'at it' ... A gentle(ish) start for the 'B' group so, if any of you feel that you've over-indulged and don't fancy an arduous walk, we take anyone and everyone.
Look forward to seeing you all.
I've not had an opportunity to study the forecast for Sunday although it sounds like the weather is due to turn appreciably colder for the weekend. Cold and dry would be perfectly acceptable for a first walk of the year.
Pete.
Happy new year to one and all, I hope you've all enjoyed a great festive break and that you're itching to get back out on the fells again this year. We start with a new area for me and, although it's a fairly long walk for the time of year, I'm confident that it'll be a gentle reintroduction to physical excersise rather than a slog-fest, we can save those for later in the year! ... Hopefully what I've selected will build up an appetite for our Xmas dinner a little later in the day. As always, I'm looking forward to that.
We begin our year a short distance after leaving the M6 at junction 37 as we depart the coach by the minor road that leads to Roan Edge Quarry before we follow the bridleway that bisects the Quarry taking us 150ft uphill (very gently) to what will be our highest point (but not the best view) of our day at just over a thousand foot above sea level.
Continuing along the bridleway we eventually meet the Fairthorns Road, leaving it immediately as we head due west towards New Hutton. A combination of paths and minor roads see us reaching the B6254 close to Strickley Bridge, followed shortly afterwards by a crossing of the quaintly named Beehive Bridge where we leave the road on our way to Underhelm Farm, Helmside Farm and eventually, the Helm itself.
The Helm is a tiny little hill overlooking Oxenholme and Kendal that affords fantastic views. The summit ridge entails an ascent of 280ft - the type of ascent that even us 'B' walkers would polish off before breakfast usually! - before we use the aforementioned B6254 to take us into Kendal to meet up with the 'A' walkers and our transport home, a trip that inclides a stop off at Garstang for some dinner.
Great to be back.

2017

10/12/2017 - AMBLESIDE

B WALK for the 10th December 2017

AMBLESIDE

Leader Peter Rossall

Distance 6½ miles / 10½ km

Ascent (total) 1,581ft / 482m

Time 4½ to 5 hours

Sunset Time 15:52

Map OL7 - The English Lakes - South Eastern Area

Start Grid Ref: SD413987


Hi all,
Not quite sure (up to now) what John has planned for the 'A' walk. I assume he's waiting a while to see if a definitive weather forecast turns up. The various online weather information that I've seen tells me that we may have a fine, dry, albeit a little chilly, day, whereas another website has indicated that we may have snow, and possibly quite a lot of it. Confused dot com or what? ...
Anyway, for my 'B' walk, I'll be doing our usual (relatively easy) Xmas walk, a walk that may include Wansfell, although that will be determined by the weather and conditions on Sunday.
For anyone who doesn't fancy either my 'B' walk, or whatever John has planned for his 'A' walk, Dave Clegg will also be 'leading' (astray) his 'P' walk ... which is a day in Ambleside that starts with a full English breakfast before enjoying a few beverages in selected Public Houses (that's what the P stands for) in the town. It sounds great and probably is. Once again I've been invited - and seriously considered taking Cleggy up on his invite - but, my loyalty to my flock won the day, although the fact that Cleggy said that I'd have to pay for my own breakfast and beers also helped with my decision. Don't let my reluctence to join his band of merry men (and lasses) affect yout decision.
See you all on Sunday for our final walk of this year. After this weeks weather, the Lake District might look spectacularly good.
For any of you who are not out this Sunday, have a great Christmas and New Year and we'll see you all again in 2018.
One day shy of being a year since we last did this walk, but who's counting?. Overall route to be determined by the weather conditions on the day - there's a threat of snowfall sometime during Sunday - although if it's not too bad (whether that be 'on the ground' or we're in 'White-out' conditions) we may take on the ascent of Wansfell. That said, the opportunity is still available for anyone who doesn't wish to scale the heights to go around Wansfell via Jenkin Crag. Either way, hopefully we'll have a thoroughly enjoyable final walk of 2017. Thanks for your company throughout.
Leaving the coach close to the Tourist Information Centre in Windermere, we'll head across the road and take the popular signposted route to Orrest Head, a summit that, despite its lack of height, is a wonderful vantage point for an early 'morning coffee break. Those who've been here with me before so that's plenty of you will know the way from here but, just like last year, we'll use a different route off Orrest Head than the one we usually take, heading down towards Common Wood where we cross a stile and turn left before eventually rejoining the path we usually take by the minor road at Near Orrest.
A short stretch of road walking followed by a few (usually) muddy fields brings us to Far Orrest, continuing on to reach the A592 road. A small section of pavement walking brings us to the path that heads downhill to cross Trout Beck via the double footbridges*, which hopefully have been replaced following their demise in the aftermath of Storm Desmond two years ago - *they hadn't been replaced 12 months ago so here's hoping - before climbing up the valleys western side to eventually reach Holbeck Lane and then Robin Lane.
Here's where we decide whether to climb Wansfell or not. Our usual route takes us past High Skelghyll Farm and Jenkin Crag to end shortly afterwards in Ambleside - an option that is still available for anyone who doesn't wish to climb Wansfell but, for those of us who do, we'll continue along Hundreds Road track before it runs out and we take the permitted path across some fairly boggy ground. Eventually it meets the main path leading from Troutbeck to Wansfell Pike and we join this and head uphill to the summit which, providing we're not in a white-out, should provide us with wonderful views of the Ill Bell ridge, Red Screes, Fairfield Horseshoe and Windermere lake before heading down to finish in Ambleside.
Finally, as today is our final walk of the year, please may I thank everybody for their support and to wish you all a merry Christmas and a happy new year. See you all again in 2018.
* If the footbridges are still unuseable, we'll continue towards Robin Lane via the roads.
26/11/2017 - STAVELEY

B WALK for the 26th November 2017

STAVELEY

Leader Peter Rossall

Distance 6 miles / 10 km

Ascent (total) 656ft / 200m

Time 4¼ Hours

Sunset Time 16:01

Map OL7 - The English Lakes - South Eastern Area

Start Grid Ref: SD491958


So here we are, using Staveley once again as a destination. There must be a special reason why this place seems so popular ... I wonder what it could be?.
Because of the short daylight hours, and what I suspect will be rather boggy ground, I considered doing the same walk that we've done previously from Windermere to Staveley via Borrans Tarn but, having done that twice before I thought I'd opt for a new route which still sees us visit a tarn, albeit that its one we've never previously been to.
We'll begin from the A591 just north west of Kendal. I was hoping to start close to the Elba Monument although Google Earth indicates that we may struggle to stop the coach in that area. If that's not possible, we'll travel a further half mile before pulling into a layby just past Ratherheath Lane. Whichever start point we use we'll make our way towards Burneside where we'll cross the railway and the river Kent before using the Dales Way for a very short stretch.
Leaving the Dales Way we begin our only serious climb of the day as we gain 650ft of height, passing by Braban House on our way to Potter Tarn. Just over half way through our walk and basically its all down hill from here.
Reaching the outskirts of Staveley at Barley Bridge good photo opportunities of the weir available we have two options, cross Barley Bridge and make our way into village via the main road or, use our usual riverside path to cross the river by the footbridge that brings us directly to the industrial park that houses both Wilf's Café and the Hawkshead Brewery.
Our choice of route may well be determined by the amount of mud we've encountered previously during our day. As stated earlier, I have a feeling that it may be a bit damp!
12/11/2017 - TEBAY

B WALK for the 12th November 2017

TEBAY

Leader Peter Rossall

Distance 7½ miles / 12 km

Ascent (total) 824ft / 251m

Time 4¾ Hours

Sunset Time 16:15

Maps OL7 - The English Lakes - South Eastern Area and OL19 - Howgill Fells & Upper Eden Valley

Start Grid Ref: NY553033


Hello everyone,
Sorry I wasn't able to be with you all last time out but hopefully I will be this time (I'm confident that I will be). Short daylight hours mean that I've selected a relatively short walk this weekend although I'd like to think that it'll be no less pleasent for that. We started from the same spot five and a half years ago and I looked at copying that walk in its entireity, due in no small measure to the fact that where we reach our high spot this Sunday is where we strode out to cross the ridge that seperates Borrowdale from Bretherdale, finishing at Jeffrey's Mount overlooking the Lune Gorge. However, I remembered that our previous walk included a ridiculously steep descent off our final hill so I decided to look at a different route instead.
It's a bit early in the week to have total confidence in the weather forecast for Sunday although, fingers crossed, its currently looking fairly settled.
Here's what I've got for anyone who fancies a relatively easy(ish) 'B' walk.
See you Sunday, Just like John, I considered copying the walk that we did in 2012 around this location and I've chosen to use the same route for the first mile or so, although after that our route takes us on a different path over new terrain. Nothing too taxing with our only serious ascent and it's not all that serious being just over 500ft, however, its right at the start so we get it out of the way early.
We begin from the A6 trunk road just south of Huck's Bridge from where we'll cross Borrow Beck (via the A6) before using the path on the northern side of the Borrowdale valley, albeit that it's obviously not the more famous Borrowdale that we all know so well.
Shortly we'll arrive at Breasthigh Road, a byway that crosses the high ground in between Borrowdale and Bretherdale and our only ascent of any note in the whole day. Up, over and down to arrive at Bretherdale Head before turning eastwards, crossing a minor road and various fields to arrive in the hamlet of Greenholme. A couple more fields follow as we head towards Steps Farm where we turn and head uphill towards the railway line and M6 motorway.
We pass under the Railway but don't quite reach the motorway, instead turning right onto a minor road which passes the outside of the often used Tebay Services before we re-cross the railway by Scotchman's Bridge, leaving the road by turning left once across the bridge. Our next landmark is Low Scales Farm which we pass before following the path alongside Birk Beck. Just before its confluence with the river Lune we cross the beck before crossing below the M6 and crossing the Lune itself via a sturdy footbridge, leading to a very short uphill path that deposits us by the Cross Keys Inn where hopefully our coach will be (there is sufficient room to park our coach, although whether the landlord fancies a coach being parked there all day may be another matter).
Hopefully we'll have had a decent days walking in pleasant weather and, up to now, the forecast is looking promising for a dry day at least.
29/10/2017 - BROUGHTON in FURNESS

B WALK for the 29th October 2017

BROUGHTON in FURNESS via Torver

Leader Peter Rossall

Distance 9.5 miles / 15 km

Ascent (total) 705ft / 215m

Time 5½ hours

Sunset Time 16:43

Maps OL7 - The English Lakes - South Eastern Area and OL19 - Howgill Fells & Upper Eden Valley

Start Grid Ref: SD285941


Hello everyone,
Broughton in Furness again! ... for the third year on the run, and the fourth time in five years ... it seems like a popular destination, although its yearly popularity is lost on me! It must be all that mud that attracts people?
Anyway, enough of my musings, here's what I'm looking at doing this Sunday. Quite a long walk (for the time of year) although there's no great height to be attained.
A bit too early to be absolutely certain as yet but the weather is looking pleasant with sunshine and decent viewing conditions predicted. That said, the wind direction is due north so it could be a tad cool. Don't forget to pack your hats and gloves in your rucksacks (just in case) oh, and gaiters might be the order of the day to help with all that lovely mud!
See you on Sunday, Todays walk is one that the B group have completed previously, almost two years to the day - November 1st 2015 to be precise, although on that occasion I wasn't with you as I had a prior engagement (at work, therefore nothing exciting!) so, because I missed out last time, I thought I'd indulge myself and see if the walk was as good as everyone indicated. I have to say that I was informed that your leader(s) on that day did just fine in what were relatively misty conditions, the type of conditions that would have seen me taking the wrong path for certain... It's nice to know that I'll be in the company of such talented people who'll be able to point me in the right direction if I get it wrong this Sunday.
We'll leave the comfort of our transport just before reaching the junction of the A5084 and A593 at Torver, from where we'll head down the track towards Moor Farm, turning left onto a path before reaching the farm. This path brings us to Mill Bridge although today we'll not be crossing the bridge, instead turning right to follow the bridleway that passes Torver Tarn (described as a disused reservoir on the map) and, having passed the tarn, we join the Cumbria Way which will be our companion for the next three miles or so.
Our next point of reference is Beacon Tarn and, weather conditions allowing, we'll probably have an elevenses stop here. Continuing southwards, we descend a little before climbing gently up and over the shoulder of Tottlebank Height to arrive at a bridleway that we've used before, where we'll turn right (leaving the Cumbria Way) and heading gently downhill to join the minor road by the Giant's Grave. The Giant's Grave is a fairly nondescript stone hiding in the bracken just behind you to your right and, if truth be told, I'm not quite sure why it warrants a mention on OS maps.
Having viewed the rock, we'll turn right to follow the road steeply downhill, looking for a track off to the left which brings us to another minor road which we cross to enter into Longfield Wood. Continuing past Woodland Hall the path turns south west to cross over Thornthwaite Latter Rigg (as the path rises, a track off to the left avoids a 200ft ascent and takes you past Fell End camping barn before the two routes rejoin one another).
Almost home, with just the crossing of a rather muddy field to negotiate. We've had issues here previously but, its only mud, and water, and bog, and all of us have survived in one way or another (although four years ago, Claire and Jeanne had to be forcefully persuaded that wet feet were infinitely better than waiting for the ground to dry out!).
Eventually we'll join a minor road where we turn left. The road forks a couple of hundred yards further on and we take the right hand option before joining a path that takes us past Wall End and into Broughton in Furness.
15/10/2017 - GLENRIDDING

B WALK for the 15th October 2017

GLENRIDDING

Leader Peter Rossall

Distance 9/9.25 miles

Ascent (total) Depends on option

Time Depends on option

Sunset Time 18:15

Map The English Lakes - Explorer OL5 - South Eastern Area

Start Grid Ref : NY387170


Hi all,
First things first, sincere apologies for the late arrival of this information, with further apologies for the fact that I'm still not certain exactly what I'm doing tomorrow ... my belief in us having good weather is not as confident as John feels we will have.
I'm led to believe that tomorrows weather may include some light drizzle, which is not a real problem, although more pertinently, we may have some stiffish breezes to cope with with occasional strong gusts on exposed higher ground. Again we can probably cope with that although the final 'problem' may be low cloud. I love climbing the high fells for the views that those heights afford us all however, I've never really been bothered to slog up a hill to see nothing because you're up in the clouds (other views exist and are relevent) so, because of my fears are that we may have a day with the higher tops shrouded in cloud I'm proposing to do either of the following routes, both of which are dependent on weather conditions on the day.

Option 1 (my preferred option)
9 mile circular walk from Glenridding* taking us through Boredale Hause and across Place Fell before using the lakeside path back to Side Farm and Glenridding.
Option 2
9.25 mile linear walk from Glenridding to Pooley Bridge, going via Aira Force waterfall and the 'Balcony Route' of Gowbarrow Fell in a repeat of the walk that we did last September. Our walk starts from the coach park by Matlock Bath Railway Station from where we'll ascend the High Tor limestone escarpment that overlooks the gorge upon which a lot of this spa towns fame is developed from.
Option 1 is a challenging walk for a 'B' group, option 2 is far easier, but still a very pleasant trek.
See you tomorrow, let's hope that the forecasters have it wrong and the weather is tropical (but without any hurricanes!).
Pete.
1/10/2017 - MATLOCK BATH

B WALK for the 1st October 2017

MATLOCK BATH

Leader Peter Rossall

Distance 6 miles / 9¾ km

Ascent (total) 1417ft / 432m/p>

Time 4½ hours

Sunset Time 18:48

Map OL24 The Peak District (White Peak area)

Start Grid Ref : SK297585


Hi everyone,
sorry its a bit late but I've been watching the weather forecast. It's gonna be great ... honest!
The 'B' walk is short, but delightful, although I would say that wouldn't I? ... with plenty of delightful Derbyshire's glorious, glutinious mud ... I know you love it.
See you Sunday,
Pete.
Todays walk almost mirrors a walk that we did on the only previous occasion that we visited this area. On that occasion I had our distance down as 8 miles but, having reccied todays walk last Thursday, I can assure that we won't be covering 8 miles, albeit that the strenuousness of the 6 miles makes it feel a lot further than 6 miles usually does.
We end our day with us taking in the delights of Matlock Bath Promenade and yes, it does have a Promenade (complete with Chip shops and Amusements Arcades) despite being almost as far away from the sea as it's possible to be in England. If we stay late enough we'll even see their illuminations.
Our walk starts from the coach park by Matlock Bath Railway Station from where we'll ascend the High Tor limestone escarpment that overlooks the gorge upon which a lot of this spa towns fame is developed from. To extend our day, I've decided to take us to Riber Castle, although that means a very steep climb, whether the climb is worth it is dependent on your viewpoint as the Castle is actually no longer a castle, having been redeveloped as a rather selective set of apartments for (I assume) rich people.
Having viewed the Castle and, more importantly, the views that the hill the castle is on give you, we'll head back down into the valley to start our next ascent. Crossing the main road (A6), we follow St John's Road as it heads steeply uphill towards Cliffe House as we make our way inextricably towards the Heights of Abraham complex (a place that we can't enter, because we haven't paid the requisite fee!), although we're still allowed to use the facilities on its outer margins.
All downhill from here (believe that if you want) with some fairly steep and fairly muddy sections, ending with us being deposited on the A6 at Masson Mills (a local landmark and tourist attraction) before we follow the road back into Matlock Bath itself to avail ourselves of its amenities.
Only a short walk although despite that, its actually quite strenuous.
There are some excellent views to be had from High Tor although caution, and great care, should be taken at all times as it's a sheer cliff face. I don't want anybody falling off.
17/9/2017 - PATELEY BRIDGE

B WALK for the 17th September 2017

PATELEY BRIDGE

Leader Peter Rossall

Distance 9 miles / 14½ km

Ascent (total) 581ft / 177m

Time 6 hours

Sunset Time 19:23

Map OL298 Nidderdale

Start Grid Ref : SE157655


Hello all,
I'm back on leading duties this weekend so please accept my apologies for the lateness of these details but, I've been enjoying myself on holiday this week. Many thanks to JT (John Thompson) for leading the 'B' group last time out in Grasmere, with his able lieutenants Steve Simpson and Les Holt ready to help as and when required (which was rarely). Despite the weather turning rather nasty half way through our day, everyone seemed to enjoy the walk.
The weather looks OK for this Sunday with pleasant temperatures for walking in and no rain, although if we do get any rain its not my fault ... OK!.
Anyway, here's what we've got. Similar in lots of ways to what the 'A' group will be doing, just not as far, or as fast.
See you all tomorrow,
Pete.
Todays walk matches the one that we did five years ago on the clubs only previous visit to this area during my dozen years or so with it. Its a relatively easy walk although that doesn't mean that there's no blood sweat and tears to be expended.
What it does include is the wonderful site of Brimham Rocks. I'm sure that plenty of you and who knows, maybe even all of you, will have been to the rocks before, but they are always worth another visit.
Beginning from the car park just west of the river Nidd, we walk back over the bridge and head up the High Street, following the road right as it turns into Ripon Road. Just past the church we turn left onto a footpath that heads steeply uphill.
A combination of paths, fields and minor roads eventually deposits us on Brimham Moor where we find the extraordinary Brimham Rocks. A cornucopia of rocks exotically shaped by thousands of years of wind and rain should astound you and also make for marvellous photo opportunities. For those brave/energetic types amongst us, there's ample opportunity to clamber all over the rocks. Be careful though as falling off is not recommended.
We head back to Pateley via a different route, walking through Smelthouses and Low Laithe before joining the riverside path which we'll follow through Glasshouses to finish back in Pateley Bridge.
3/9/2017 - GRASMERE

B WALK for the 3rd September 2017

GRASMERE

Leader John Thompson

Distance 8 miles / 12.9 km

Ascent (total) 2070 ft / 631 m

Time 6 hours

Sunset Time 19:57

Map OL7 The English Lakes, south eastern area

Start Grid Ref : NY339074


Hi all,
Please find details of the 'B' walk for Sunday, lead on this occasion by someone other than myself.
The weather is currently not predicted to be great, although there's time for that to change (for better or worse). Light rain is forecast, although seeing as we're in the Lakes that could mean anything from a perfect day for walking to a monsoon, although we had one of those a month ago in the Lakes so maybe we'll swerve that one. Either way, we'll enjoy it, because we always do.
Here's what our 'guest leader' has planned for you.
Pete.
First things first, I hope you've noticed that you've got a new leader this week. Shame on you if you hadn't. John has very kindly offered to lead todays walk and I was delighted to give him the opportunity. Hopefully others will feel invigorated enough to pick up the mantle and offer to do the same occasionally (you never know when I'll not be available) and this leading lark is not as difficult as some of us - me - make it look. All I ask for JT's debut is that you afford him the same respect that you've always shown to me. Thanks, Pete.
For John's first go at leading, he's taking us to an old favourite, although there's a twist!. Rather than the usual ascent of the Lion and the Lamb from the front, we'll be tackling it from the reverse side.
John has chosen to use the Greenburn valley to reach Calf Crag (our high spot of the day) before following the ridge back towards Helm Crag and, eventually, Grasmere.
The day begins relatively easily before a stiffish pull-up sees us make the ridge close to Calf Crag (1,762ft). It's mainly downhill from here, although as is the way with these things, its never quite that easy and we have a couple more ascents to complete onto Gibson Knott (1,379ft) and Helm Crag (1,299ft). One interesting bit of information is that the actual summit of Helm Crag, a rock formation by the name of the Howitzer, happens to be the only summit that Alfred Wainwright failed to conquer. You'll probably realise why once we get there.
The views from here are spectacular with the Helvellyn range to the east, Easedale Tarn and Sour Milk Ghyll to the west, and south of us are Grasmere, both the town and lake, and beyond them, Loughrigg Fell. Hopefully we'll have had a great day and you can all thank JT personally. Thanks for giving me a day in the ranks John.

B WALK for the 20th August 2017

MOFFAT

Leader Peter Rossall

Distance 12½ miles / 20 km

Ascent (total) 985ft / 300m

Time 6 hours

Sunset Time 20:29

Map 330 Moffat & St. Mary's Loch & 332 Annandale

Start Grid Ref : NT092050


Hi all,
Apologies once again for the late nature of my details for this weekends walk, its been a bit of a challenge.
Its an area that I like, although I don't know it all that well. I looked at repeating the walk that I did here in 2014, which was long but easy, and if truth be told, relatively uninteresting as well. Knowing that I had that as a substitute if I couldn't find anything that I considered more suitable, I took to the Internet in an attempt to find us 'B' groupers something that is both pleasant and challenging, without ever becoming a slogfest and, because there's some big(ish) hills round here, the walks that I reviewed were either too long for us (when you add on the height gain as well) or far too short. Hopefully what I've plumped for turns out to be a suitable distance and challenge whilst remaining firmly in 'B' group territory (because we wouldn't wish to show our 'A' group warriors up now, would we?).
On the plus side, the weather, that was looking decidedly dicey for Sunday earlier in the week, seems to have quietened down and we're promised a dry day with pleasant temperatures and a gentle breeze.
See you all tomorrow in Bonny Scotland.
Pete.
Well then, what a time I've had attempting to sort out a suitable B walk for this area ... and I'm still not convinced that I've made the right choice!, time will tell. It's not that Moffat isn't suitable, on the contrary it's a delightful area, it's just that the hills seem quite a long way from the town for circular routes, hence the reason for the length of our route. Also we're doing something I've never done previously in almost nine years of leading the B walks.
Basically our walk is a straight out and back trek, using the same route in both directions. Due to Scotland's right to roam, Ordnance Survey maps for Scotland don't show paths and my conservatism means that I'm not as confident at going off-piste as John Adams is.
If only I possessed half of John's spirit of adventure, although that occasionally leads to his group having to climb over walls and other obstacles, which they all love!. Despite being long, by B group standards, this walk doesn't look too difficult (those famous last words again) and hopefully turns out to be more pleasant than I'm anticipating.
We get dropped by the coach half a mile out of Moffat on the A708 at its junction with the Old Carlisle Road from where we head south along the road for just under a mile and a half to Drumcrieff Bridge. Here we'll leave the road to join the Southern Upland Way (Scotlands version of a Coast-to-Coast route, and longer than its English counterpart) as it heads eastwards.
Our route sees us pass through woodlands and alongside the river (Moffat Water) to reach the remains of Cornel Tower. From here we begin a gradual ascent that eventually brings us to Wamphrey Water where the Way turns abruptly.
My original plan was to continue up to Craigmichen Scar, but that meant another 300ft of ascent over a further 1¼ miles and, realising that we'd already walked just short of 6 miles to where I plan to turn for home, I decided against going further. Fingers crossed that I've picked the correct route.
6/8/2017 - ENNERDALE BRIDGE

B WALK for the 6th August 2017

ENNERDALE BRIDGE

Leader Peter Rossall

Distance 9¼ miles / 15 km

Ascent (total) Negligible (approx 100ft / 31m)

Time 5½ hours

Sunset Time 20:59

Map OL4 The English Lakes North Western area

Start Grid Ref : NY070159


Hi all,
First of all, apologies for the very late nature of this info (in all fairness, it's probably too late for most of you), but in my defence, I've been busy!!!!.
I have a relatively easy day planned for the 'B' group, hope you like it.
See you tomorrow (err, later today).
Pete.
We follow our last walk, which was basically an A walk, with a very easy walk in yet another brand new area, not just for me, but for the club as well.
I've selected this easy walk on the basis that 1: I don't know the area at all, 2: You deserve an easy one after last time, 3: The weather forecast is not great and 4: Because I reckon that it will take us quite a long time to reach, and thereby also get back from, our destination. Hopefully those things won't detract from another enjoyable day.
Just like the A group, we begin from the village of Ennerdale Bridge, taking the road heading due east to pass by Lily Hall prior to taking the right hand fork where the road splits. We leave the tarmac as the road bends left at 90 degrees before shortly afterward we reach the shoreline of Ennerdale Water.
Our walk today sees us stick to the shoreline of this lake come reservoir, hence the reason for the lack of height gain during the day. The map shows the path sticking rigidly to the lakeside although I suspect that there may be a few ups and downs (this is Cumbria after all and as we all know that even lakeside paths in Cumbria are never flat). There is one part by Anglers Crag where we have a short sharp climb to negotiate but, that climb apart, our day should be fairly easy.
I'm led to believe that the views of the wonderfully remote Ennerdale valley are spectacular from all around the lakeside. Hopefully we get finished before the worst of the forecasted weather sets in but, if we've not completed our walk once the rain starts at least we'll be at low level and on easy terrain.
We end our circuit of the lake by the weir before retracing our steps back to the comfort of the Shepherds Arms Hotel.
23/7/2017 - DUFTON

B WALK for the 23rd July 2017

DUFTON

Leader Peter Rossall

Distance 10¼ miles / 16¾ km

Ascent (total) 1618ft / 493m

Time 6½ hours

Sunset Time 21:23

Map OL19 Howgill Fells and Upper Eden Valley

Start Grid Ref : NY690250


Hi all,
Apologies for the lateness of my walk details for this weekend - blame it on a hectic work schedule, the Tour de France (err no, I wasn't in it!) and the golf (ditto) - although at least my tardiness has allowed the weather forecast to inmprove slightly. We may get a wee bit of rain (light showers) and some sunshine although, on the plus side, there'll be relatively pleasent temperatures, aided by a gentle breeze which should help to keep things cooler than we had a fortnight ago (when we had a bit of a scorcher).
Here's what's on offer.
See you tomorrow.
Pete.
After our relatively easy walk last time out, today we're doing one of those walks that could quite easily be described as the equivalent of an A walk. As a B group we've done it before and I'm confident that all of my usual party are very definitely capable of completing and, more importantly, enjoying this walk.
As for the A walkers themselves, we'll be following in their footsteps for the first half of this walk before our paths deviate and, we'll also be going a lot slower.
We start our walk from Dufton making our way from the eastern edge of the village via the bridleway that heads north-east towards Dufton Pike. The path passes to the right of the Pike as it climbs steadily for 1600ft over 3½ miles to reach our highest point of the day at 2,223ft on the fell top plateau just above Great Rundale Tarn, a spot where I propose to have luncheon.
Next we follow the northern bank of the tarn outflow (Maize Beck) east, south east and then southerly for 1½ miles, fording a few streams and becks along the way prior to crossing Maize Beck via a footbridge, whereupon we turn left to join the Pennine Way footpath.
Within a short distance and with no great fanfare, one of Britain's outstanding natural features suddenly appears in front of us. High Cup is a fantastic U shaped valley. Our path takes us along the northern rim as we begin our descent back to our start point. Our path passes Peeping Hill, Dod Hill and Bow Hall to reach the road ½ mile east of Dufton. I'm sure that the Stag Inn will be a welcome refuge where you can all tell me how beautiful, easy and enjoyable today's walk was.
9/7/2017 - FRODSHAM

B WALK for the 9th July 2017

FRODSHAM

Leader Peter Rossall

Distance 9 miles / 14½ km

Ascent (total) 358ft / 109m

Time 5 hours

Sunset Time 21:39

Map OL 267 Northwich & Delamere Forest

Start Grid Ref : SJ540687


Hi all,
Sorry my walk description is so late, it's just that I'm not so used to John being as 'on the ball' as he was this week. It's a bit early to be 100% certain although the forecasters are saying that we'll have pleasantly warm weather, with a just a gentle breeze to keep us cool. No great height to be attained although after surfing the net for info on this area (due to my lack of knowledge of it), the high ground affords us wonderful views apparently. Here's what I've got planned.
See you on Sunday.
Pete
As can be seen by the overall height that we've got to climb this week, it looks like we can expect a very easy walk with the only problem being navigation! We'll start in a forest, and most of you are acutely aware of my loathing for forests, although the navigational problems don't end there. The new map that I've purchased specifically for this area doesn't lack paths, on the contrary, it actually has a surfeit of them, lots of which are named trails, and quite often two or more of these trails cover the same bit of ground and therein lies my cause for concern. I'm confident that we'll not get lost, although I'm less sure that we'll follow the route that I've planned precisely. If we don't reach Frodsham at some point, you have my permission to request my resignation as your leader (I use the term very loosely).
PS: Enjoy this easy day because in a fortnight us B walkers will be doing one of our more strenuous walks, a walk that could quite easily be classed as an A walk (it's a cracker though and you'll all love it).
Just as a fortnight ago we are treading new territory again this weekend although, unlike last time, I've not reccied this walk and it's an area that I don't know.
I'm assuming that we'll be dropping John's band of A walkers off in Frodsham before we get transported a further 5 miles south to our starting point at the southern end of the Delamere Forest. Departing the coach by the Lodge on the A54 we head due north, and directly into the forest, to use the Sandstone Trail which I'm hoping to follow all the way to its conclusion in Frodsham.
The trail crosses a railway and a minor road prior to continuing through the forest, with us eventually being deposited at Manly Common where we're met by a short stretch of tarmac. We leave the tarmac but our respite is short lived as a longer section of road walking ensues, taking us past Simmond's Hill.
Thankfully our road walking is ended as we head under Alvanley Cliff on our way to Woodhouse Hill and finally Frodsham Hill from where we dip down into Frodsham itself where I assume that the A walkers will be waiting for us.
25/6/2017 - CONWY (Conway)

B WALK for the 25th June 2017

CONWY (Conway)

Leader The Invisible man

Distance 7¾ miles / 12¼ km

Ascent (total) 997ft / 304m

Time 5 hours

Sunset Time 21:45

Map OL17 Snowden & Conwy Valley

Start Grid Ref : SH784773


Hi all,
As some of you who have the sense - or possibly a lack of it! - to read my inane ramblings on facebook, you'll be aware that I have to work this Sunday so I'm unavailble to join you all. This causes me great distress, not because I'm irreplaceable (ha ha, as if!), no it's more because I enjoy our days out together and, having reccied this area a few weeks ago, I was really looking forward to what I had planned for you.
I'll send a detailed description of my proposed walk, toegther with my compass and a map, although the opportunity remains for anyone to 'design' their own 'B' walk in my absence if preferred.
Looks like the weather will be fine, thankfully with pleasant rather than the ridiculously hot temperatures that we've experperienced lately.
Have a great day. Here's what I had, together with a copy of my detailed description.
See you all in a fortnight.
Pete
First things first, apologies that I can't be with you this week. It'll have a greater effect on me than it will on yo, hence the reason why I've left the leader position open. I reccied this walk a few weeks ago (so I know how good it is) and I'm due to send detailed instructions of the route for someone to follow. That said, if anyone wishes to arrange their own B walk for you good folk, I'd be happy with that. Not a particularly long or a difficult walk although there's enough in it to get the pulses racing (occasionally). Enjoy your day, whatever you do. Hopefully see you in a fortnight.
Yet another new destination for our club, we seem to have had lots of those this year, which I like - although the numbers we've been experiencing would lead you to believe that not everyone views searching out new territory with the same relish.
I'm aware that Fylde Coast Ramblers had a wonderful day in Conwy last year and I'm sure that some of our troops who walk with both clubs were instrumental in putting forward this area as a new destination for us. The alternative is to get persisted on in Snowdonia... so hopefully you'll have a good day.
Anyway, if someone chooses to do this route, it's a little belter. No great height gain (just under a thousand foot in total) but with views that are wonderful
. Pass through the arch under the railway, going left (up the steps) or right, then left, up a sloped path with both options depositing you at the road. Turn right and proceed along the pavement to the road junction (with the Castle immediately on your right). C Cross the road with caution heading towards the road and rail bridges passing through an archway within the town walls before turning left onto the Quayside.
Climb relatively steeply uphill through gorse and bracken until a large rock is reached and the gradient eases. As you'll have walked for about an hour to this point, I suggest a morning break would be in order. For anyone with ants in their pants, climbing slightly higher - about 10ft - affords you great views across the Conwy estuary to the Great Orme.
Suitably refreshed, our route takes us left of the large rock along a flattish path that rises and swoops but without any major ups or downs. Continue on a basically straight course, ignoring paths off to the right and left, passing a sign for the Conwy Mountain Hillfort. Carry on with NWP path heading slightly right (and downhill) to reach a large grassed area that contains a seat room for three, maybe four, so ladies and children first! This makes an ideal lunch stop. The views across to Llandudno and the Great Orme are simply magnificent.
Having hopefully enjoyed a tremendous lunch, we now head south west, passing the raised area of Alltwen (on our right) bringing us to a farm track that heads downhill, offering fantastic views where it turns at 90 degrees to the left, eventually depositing us at the Sychnants Pass car park.
Here we cross the road and go through a gate diagonally opposite. Continue steadily uphill, taking care not to miss the NWP sign (on our right) that turns sharply back on ourselves, before turning left as the gradient eases to follow a purple arrow onto a grassy path, climbing steadily all the time. This path crosses and re-crosses under a set of overhead wires coming to a crossroads directly under these wires where either option is available as both paths end up at the same place. I suggest taking the option straight ahead (waymarked with a yellow arrow) as opposed to turning right at 90 degrees. This path heads uphill and gently around to the right to meet a wall with a gate and ladder stile which we cross to reach Maen Esgob. H aving used the stile (or gate) to cross the wall, a broad track appears to follow the wall to our left. Ignore this, instead following the track heading downhill directly ahead of us. At the point where the track turns to the right, we turn left, following a path through a delightful valley between low hills. Shortly a small lake (Llyn y Wrach) is reached and, if required, this would make a suitable spot for an afternoon break.
A short pull uphill from the lake leads to a path heading left that we need to follow as we make our way back towards Conwy. Almost all downhill from here. Our grass path eventually developes into a stony farm track which leads down to a minor road. Immediately opposite is a flattish grassy area which we cross to reach a further minor road by a house called Gogwrn. Turn left and walk downhill for a few yards before taking the grass path on your right heading towards Crows Nest Farm. Through the gate to pass the farm buildings staying left to follow a slender path that brings you to a tarmac road (Oakwood). Upon reaching a T junction, turn right and almost immediately turn left to cross three fields. Upon reaching the third of these fields (with houses at the opposite side of the field), turn left immediately to use the field boundary and shortly the road (the Sychnants Pass) will be reached. Turn right onto the road, using the pavements where available, and follow this for just over half a mile back into Conwy.
11/6/2017 - BUTTERMERE

B WALK for the 11th June 2017

BUTTERMERE

Leader Peter Rossall

Distance 8 miles / 13 km

Ascent (total) 1808ft / 551m

Time 5¾ hours

Sunset Time 21:41

Map OL4 - The English Lakes, North-western area

Start Grid Ref : NY236236


Evenin' all,
It seems like I'm destined never to do Ard Crags!. I only say that because I've had a look at the weather forecast for Sunday and it says rain around midday until late afternoon. I can put up with a bit of rain but unfortunately it's due to be accompanied with very strong winds blowing from the south west - so we'd be walking directly into it - making walking on higher ground and ridges (just where we'd be) arduous. Hmmmm.
Still, there's time for the weather to improve on what's forecast before Sunday... hope springs eternal. Anyway, here's what I'm presently planning to do although, should the weather on the day make an ascent of Ard Crags dangerous, or even less than sensible, then we can still use the same start and finish points whilst staying lower by going through the valley rather than ascending the high ground.
See you all on Sunday and keep smiling.
Pete
Buttermere, a beautiful place, but a bit of a sod to get to, so, to save us the tedious part of the journey, I've decided to repeat a walk that I undertook four years ago although I personally never completed it (the reasons for that are quite well known so I'll not bore you with an explanation). Our walk starts easily, or even very easily but then involves a stiff climb onto a ridge before falling down to meet the Newlands Pass road at its summit. Options here are to follow the road to Buttermere or to take an off road detour which involves an extra half mile of distance and 550ft of ascent. W We'll still have to endure the tedious coach journey back from Buttermere, but by then we'll probably all be snoozing!.
We begin from the Braithwaite turn off the A66 before following a flat course following Newlands Beck to Stair. A bit of tarmac pounding sees us gaining height gradually before we reach the bridge over Rigg Beck where we'll leave the road. Prior to leaving the road, I suggest that we have a quick shuftie at the building that replaced what was a local landmark known as the Purple House (see the attached picture), which burnt down in 2006. Apparently the new building is not to everybody's taste. Personally, I prefer the new house.
Anyhow, enough of this touristy nonsense ! ... now for some serious climbing. We follow Rigg Beck for a short while before finding a point suitable for crossing it as our next port-of-call is the big lump ahead and slightly to our left. That is Ard Crags and it's fairly steep as we pass across Aiken Knott to reach the summit itself before continuing along the ridge, losing about 270ft of height, 190ft of which needs to be regained to top out on Knott Rigg. All down hill from here (unless we detour) with the road at Newlands Hause our first objective.
The road can be followed steeply down hill (via the grass verge) or alternatively we can head up and past Moss Force waterfall before reaching the path that heads from Buttermere up to Robinson's summit, a path that we'll follow downwards to end up in Buttermere village where the café and the couple of pubs await our custom.
28/5/2017 - MIDDLETON-in-TEESDALE

B WALK for the 28th May 2017

MIDDLETON-in-TEESDALE

Leader Peter Rossall

Distance 7¼ miles / 11½ km

Ascent (total) 561ft / 171m

Time 5 hours

Sunset Time 21:26

Maps OL19 Howgill Fells & Upper Eden Valley and OL31 North Pennines Teesdale & Weardale

Start Grid Ref : NY947256


Hi all,
Hope you've all enjoyed our little heatwave because I'm reliably informed that it's due to end tomorrow!, although thankfully only for one day. F or our trip on Sunday, the weather is threatening to be cooler - in a pleasantly warm sort of way rather than the "Scorchio" temperatures that we've had to put up with this week - although any rain and/or thunderstorms that arrive on Saturday will have disappeared by Sunday (so the weather fiolk say) to leave us with a fresher feel that is more comfortable for walking in.
On to the walk and it's an easy one this weekend although, is it necessary for them all to be tough? Details below. For those who view our Wyre Ramblers facebook page, you may have seen a message from myself t'other day requesting someone to step forward to lead an 'A' walk due to John and Linda being unavailable as they won't have returned from their holiday in time. I I've since been alerted to the fact that they may be available although they cannot be 100% sure at this present time. Apparently John has a cracking new walk for this area though whether he'll have the opportunity to use it is up in the air presently.
If anyone fancies leading an 'A' walk if John isn't available, please feel free to do so. Just one more thought, although my 'B' walk is beginning and ending at Holwick, parking facilities for the coach are not available there so the coach driver will be parking up in Middleton-in-Teesdale, thereby giving anyone the chance to use Middleton as your start and end location if required.
See you all on Sunday. Pete
Although our membership cards state that we're in Middleton-in-Teesdale today, our walk doesn't begin, end, or take us anywhere near the town. Instead we'll be starting and ending at Holwick where the Strathmore Arms awaits the opportunity to refresh us as we finish. Only a short walk today and with no great height gain making for a fairly easy day and, I have to say that this areas jewel-in-the-crown will not look at its best following our hot dry spell. C'est la vie... We will have the opportunity to add a little more mileage (and ascent) to visit another of the areas delights, though more of that lower down the page.
Beginning from the Strathmore Arms at Holwick, we'll continue along the minor road with the impressive Holwick Scar on our left prior to us joining the Green Trod, a fell path that were we to follow it for 10 miles or so would bring us to High Cup Nick but, because we'll be nearer to High Cup in a couple of months, we'll not bother today.
The Green Trod takes us across Blea Beck via its stepping stones and Whiteholm Bank before we turn north and descend to join the Pennine Way as it runs alongside the river Tees. Turning right to follow the Tees downstream we soon arrive at High Force England's largest single drop waterfall which is almost always spectacular, although I have my suspicions that that may not be the case for us today.
Continuing downhill we pass a further set of smaller waterfalls (Low Force) and the Wynch Bridge, an ancient bouncy suspension bridge that should be crossed by one person at a time to prevent it from falling into the raging torrent below!
From here we leave the river and head uphill back to the Strathmore Arms, that's unless anybody fancies a short trip to Gibsons Cave 1½ miles (about an hour) there and back which involves another waterfall (that you can get behind!) before finishing back at our start point.
14/5/2017 - ILKLEY

B WALK for the 14th May 2017

ILKLEY via OTLEY

Leader Peter Rossall

Distance 8¼ miles / 13¼ km

Ascent (total) 1,017ft / 310m

Time 5½ hours

Sunset Time 21:05

Map: 297 Lower Wharfedale & Washburn Valley

Start Grid Ref : SE115480


Hi all,
Those of you who read, or perhaps put up with may be more correct, my mini sagas on facebook should be aware that I've had a recent trip to Ilkley to recce a walk for this weekend. I can't promise you the glorious weather that I had - Wyre Ramblers seem to be fated to have indifferent weather every time we're out this year, although I'm sure it'll change ... surely it has to, doesn't it?
Anyway, it's a bit early to give an exact forecast but from what I've seen, it's neither great nor bad. Pleasantly warm with some sun and the possibility of the odd shower (we actually desperately need some rain although hopefully we won't get a day long shower).
Here's what my recce produced.
See you all on Sunday, Pete.
Ilkley again ... I say again because its only 12 months since we last visited it, although prior to last years visit we'd left it untouched for six years, so it must have made quite an impression on our last visit, not that I'm surprised by that as its a lovely area. My biggest dilemma was, do the same walk as last year or change it? ... so I thought long and hard and compromised by having the last half the same as last year but, seeing as how we'd be starting in Ilkley rather than Otley this year, we'd have to have a different first half to our day. Hopefully you'll like it.
Starting from Ilkley's town centre, we'll start climbing immediately as we head up onto Ilkley Moor (either with or without hats, as in Ilkla Moor Baht at!). Initially we're on roads/pavements, and quite steep they are, before we finally clear the town and use footpaths for our ascent. We reach White Wells, a former spa cottage which is still in use today. Thankfully the gradient eases from here and shortly we head off into the Rocky Valley, leading us ultimately to the Cow and Calf Rocks which I expect will be very popular on a Sunday in mid May.
That's the serious climbing done for the day and we continue our journey by passing the Cow and Calf Hotel before heading downhill to the river Wharfe. We have a couple of options for how we get there and both involve some road/pavement walking, although one option takes us down a private road which is a bit of a Millionaires Row that has some extravagantly nice houses on it.
Having crossed the Wharfe we'll stop for lunch before heading to territory that we trod last May. This involves a few ups and downs (though nothing of any great height) and a combination of paths, fields and roads before we end with the frequently used path through Coppy Wood, with its carpet of bluebells at this time of year always a delight.
Reacquainting ourselves with the Wharfe, we cross it via Ilkley Bridge leading us to the Riverside gardens and our coach should be nearby. Ilkley itself has plenty to offer in refreshment opportunities, whether they involve sugary cakes, teas and coffees, or alcoholic beverages. Don't be late back to the coach! ...
30/4/2017 - PIKE of BLISCO

B WALK for the 30th April 2017

PIKE of BLISCO

Leader Peter Rossall

Distance 8¼ miles / 13¼ km

Ascent (total) 1,017ft / 310m

Time 5½ hours

Sunset Time 21:05

Map: 297 Lower Wharfedale & Washburn Valley

Start Grid Ref : SE115480


Hi all,
Those of you who read, or perhaps put up with may be more correct, my mini sagas on facebook should be aware that I've had a recent trip to Ilkley to recce a walk for this weekend. I can't promise you the glorious weather that I had - Wyre Ramblers seem to be fated to have indifferent weather every time we're out this year, although I'm sure it'll change ... surely it has to, doesn't it?
Anyway, it's a bit early to give an exact forecast but from what I've seen, it's neither great nor bad. Pleasantly warm with some sun and the possibility of the odd shower (we actually desperately need some rain although hopefully we won't get a day long shower).
Here's what my recce produced.
See you all on Sunday, Pete.
Ilkley again ... I say again because its only 12 months since we last visited it, although prior to last years visit we'd left it untouched for six years, so it must have made quite an impression on our last visit, not that I'm surprised by that as its a lovely area. My biggest dilemma was, do the same walk as last year or change it? ... so I thought long and hard and compromised by having the last half the same as last year but, seeing as how we'd be starting in Ilkley rather than Otley this year, we'd have to have a different first half to our day. Hopefully you like it.
We commence our walk from the car park by Stickle Barn by heading across the road and Great Langdale Beck to reach Side House before heading west towards the camp site under Side Pike. Taking to the road, we head steeply uphill until we reach a footpath just after we've crossed Redacre Gill. This path sees us rise 1800ft to the summit of Pike of Blisco (2312ft), a place that offers fantastic views all around.
600ft below us is Red Tarn and that's our next destination as we begin our descent back towards our starting point. Passing Red Tarn, we head gently downhill until we reach the summit of the Wrynose pass road at the Three Shire Stone, this being until 1974, the boundary between the counties of Lancashire, Cumberland and Westmorland. A bit of road walking follows as we head very steeply downhill prior to taking the footpath across Blea Moss once the gradient has eased.
Our path takes us past Blea Tarn before a gentle uphill section brings us to the road connecting Great and Little Langdale. From here, we've just over a mile to go, starting with a steep downhill section before again going through the campsite that we visited this morning. Alternating from this morning we'll carry on to pass by or maybe even go in - the Old Dungeon Ghyll Hotel with a further ¾ of a mile across some flat, but possibly muddy, fields to negotiate to return us to the car park whence we started.

Todays walk falls in that category of a B walk, albeit a B walk that because of its general strenuousness and height gain could quite easily be classed as an easy A walk. That said, for anyone who doesn't fancy it, whether that's because of its strenuous nature, or the general weather conditions, the Langdale valley offers plenty of other decent walks that are easy to follow but with less difficulty.

16/4/2017 - HESKET NEWMARKET

B WALK for the 16th April 2017

HESKET NEWMARKET

Leader Peter Rossall

Distance 10¼ miles / 16½ km

Ascent (total) 845ft / 257m

Time 6 hours

Sunset Time 20:15

Map: OL5 - The English Lakes - North-Eastern Area

Start Grid Ref : NY342386


Good day all,
with apologies for the lack of walk details sent via e-mail over the last month or so. A bit of help - allied to his technical knowledge - from my son has helped me get 'back online'. Thanks son.
Anyway, Hesket Newmarket......again!, it only seems like 12 months ago since we were last here ... oh, it is, must be because its a nice area, or is it something to do with its award winning village pu? As John is doing the 'big stuff', I've decided to do a fairly long (by 'B' group standards) walk although it's relatively easy - famous last words - with less than a 1,000ft of ascent overall. Hope you like it and I'll see you all tomorrow.
PS: The weather is not going to be what we had in Delightful Derbyshire, although it's not expected to be torrential rain either. We may have a little light rain to start with but getting drier as the day wears on.
Here's your (low level) option to John's 'A' walk.
Pete.
Another walk that finds us in rolling rather than mountainous terrain this week (we seem to have had a few of those so far this year) and an area that I'm not overly familiar with, so plenty of opportunity for the odd navigational cock-up. I request your patience and understanding and maybe a bit of help - if and when that happens!. As we're into double figures it's quite a long walk by B group standards and, whilst it has some ascents, there's nothing to really take us out of our comfort zone.
Beginning our walk from the tiny village of Hesket Newmarket, we follow the road westwards (towards Caldbeck) for just over a ¼ mile before leaving the tarmac to pass by Matthew Rudding leading us to the Cumbria Way which we'll follow to the west of Caldbeck village.
We'll follow Whelpo Beck to Beckstones before starting a 400ft ascent up to Brownrigg where we turn right to head towards Brownrigg Hall Farm to eventually meet a minor road that we follow to Priests Brow Crossroads. Rather than following the road east, I propose to head downhill a couple of hundred yards to take the bridleway that rejoins the road we're not using further along and we make use of the road as we head for the telecommunications mast on Warnell Fell (our high spot for the day).
Downhill via a number of paths and minor roads to reach the river Cald Beck where we'll turn south (onto the Cumbria Way once more) to follow the river through Dentonside Wood for a couple of miles before using the footbridge across the river that will return us (via a 200ft ascent) to our starting point.

A note for next time (the Langdales), weather permitting, I'm planning one of our more strenuous B group walks as its one that we attempted, but didn't complete, a few years back, and all subsequent attempts have been thwarted by indifferent weather. Fingers crossed for this time.

19/2/2017 - BRAMPTON

B WALK for the 19th February 2017

BRAMPTON (with plenty of Talkin)

Leader Peter Rossall

Distance 11½ miles / 18½ km

Ascent (total) 994ft / 303m

Time 5½ hours

Sunset Time 17:31

Map: OL315 CarlisleO315 Carlisle

Start Grid Ref : NY530611


Hi all,
Sorry for the lateness of these details but, better late than never.
Weather wise we'll hopefully be OK tomorrow with dry, if a bit overcast, weather being predicted although there's a small chance of some light drizzle and possibly a little hill fog spoiling our day. Temperature wise, we shouldn't have any particular problems although, as always, hat and gloves are always worthy of packing in your rucksacks just in case.
As for my walk, it's a bit longer than we'd normally look to do although, distance apart, I don't forsee it giving us any major problems - obviously I'm setting up for a fall there aren't I?.
Not quite sure as to where the coach will deposit us and whether he'll be able to park in Brampton itself. I've looked on the internet to see if coach parking is available in the town although I couldn't find any information relating to that.
John and Linda are unavailable this weekend so Les is to lead the 'A' walk. I'm not sure what he's got planned but knowing him, it'll be something good. As is always the case, it's your choice as to whether you decide to do the 'A' or 'B' walk.
Here's what I've got planned, look forward to seeing all of you tomorrow.
Pete.
A third trip on the trot to new territory... and one that has caused me a few minor problems, due in no small part to my lack of knowledge of the area. As you may have noted above, our mileage is considerably more than us B walkers would normally undertake, however, it is possible to shorten our walk by two and a half miles by remaining on the road rather than ascending onto Talkin Fell. A Although 11½ miles seems a long distance by our standards, half of that mileage will be completed on tarmac so it'll be relatively easy walking, albeit that it may be seen as a little bit boring. At least we shouldn't have the mud that we had a fortnight ago!!!!.
Starting from Brampton we make our way out of the town via a disused rail line to Brampton Station 1½ miles from the town before taking to quiet country lanes as we head east, then south, towards Talkin Fell.
Three miles on and we finally get the opportunity to leave the tarmac as we go up and over Greenlea Cross, bringing us to the quarry track that we can follow onto Talkin Fell. Reaching the summit involves a little bit of traipsing across open access land (the views are supposed to be excellent, hopefully the weather allows us those views).
All that's left is to head downhill to reacquaint ourselves with the roads once more, passing by Talkin Head Farm, Talkin village and Talkin House Hotel where thankfully we can leave the tarmac to utilise the shoreline path that follows the western shore of Talkin Tarn. Leaving the tarn via the path through Tarn Wood we meet and turn right onto yet another minor road, one that deposits us back at Brampton Station from where we'll follow the route that we used at the start of our day to finish back in the town with, hopefully, sufficient time to avail ourselves of the refreshment facilities that Brampton offers.
5/2/2017 - HURST GREEN

B WALK for the 5th February 2017

HURST GREEN

Leader Peter Rossall

Distance 7¾ miles / 12½ km

Ascent (total) 872ft / 252m

Time 5 hours

Sunset Time 17:03

Maps OL287 West Pennine Moors and OL41 Forest of Bowland and Ribblesdale

Start Grid Ref : SD635395


Hi everyone,
As John has indicated, the weather for tomorrow looks set fair with a dry day and no, or very little, wind. It should hopefully make for good viewing conditions.
Having reccied my 'B' walk a couple of days ago, the one thing that I can assure you is that it will be glutinously muddy ... Here's what I've got planned for you,
Pete.
After our enjoyable trip to this part of the world a fortnight ago, the delightful Ribble Valley hosts us again today. Our walk today is both shorter and easier than the last one, although hopefully it will be no less pleasing for that. One note of warning, if you thought that it was muddy a fortnight ago, prepare yourselves for more - much more - of the same!. Compensation for all the ploughing through the mud can be taken from the views that are on offer.
Having passed through Longridge, we alight from coach just before the hamlet of Knowle Green to take the farm track that leads from Moss Gate to Hoardsell with our immediate target the telecommunication tower at Forty Acre farm directly ahead on the skyline. Taking to the road by the farm we turn right and head gently uphill with views opening up all around us.
Just over half a mile later we reach Cardwell House and I propose to have our elevenses stop here. Suitably refreshed we leave the tarmac by the car park to follow the permitted path uphill that takes us to the summit of Longridge Fell, named on the map as Spire Hill. Great views of Saddle Fell, Fair Snape Fell and Parlick (where we were a fortnight ago) are available from here and because there's a wall that we can sit either side of to use as shelter (if required), I plan to have lunch here.
Lunch taken we continue along the southern side of the wall ducking into the forested area soon after leaving the summit. This brings us to a broad track running through the forest with two very easy miles of walking and, as a further bonus, we're also heading downhill. We eventually meet a road and turn right to head steeply uphill, although it's only for about 200 yards.
Less than two miles to go and we leave the tarmac again to tread some more muddy fields, passing by Fell Side farm before another section of tarmac brings us to the right of way that sees us pass through the grounds of Stonyhurst College, before a couple more fields deposit us in Hurst Green where The Bayley Arms awaits our custom. 300 yards further down the road is some free public toilets and a second pub, the Shireburn Arms, and adjacent to the pub is Millie's, a pleasant little café for those who'd prefer that.
22/1/2017 - CHIPPING

B WALK for the 22nd January 2017

CHIPPING

Leader Peter Rossall

Distance 8½ miles / 13½ km

Ascent (total) 1,312ft / 400m

Time 4¾ hours

Sunset Time 16:36

Map OL41 Forest of Bowland and Ribblesdale

Start Grid Ref : SD622433


G'Day everyone,
A new area for our club to explore this weekend and one that I'm particularly delighted to visit. Because of it's close proximity to our starting point, I'm sure that plenty of you are already aware of its Chippings charms and one of those charms is that because it's 'on our doorstep', we'll be there in no time.
It has some small, but still fairly spectacular, fells surrounding it and I'm hopeful that we'll see it at its best on Sunday.
Here's what I've got planned.
Pete.
As some of you may have read on a short facebook statement that I posted earlier this week, because we're in an area that I don't know well, I came to do a reconnoitre a few days ago that didn't exactly go to plan. That said, surely nothing can go wrong on a second occasion can it?

We start from the coach park by the Football Club a few yards away from the city centre of Chipping where, for those of a nervous disposition, toilet facilities are available. A short walk along the road brings us to a fingerpost guiding us into a field, a rather muddy field, but we've been through worse.
Our field eventually brings us to a track that sees us end up at Saddle End Farm. Sadly for us this farm should actually be named Saddle Begins Farm as this is where we start climbing steadily uphill (onto Saddle Fell, hence the name). In all fairness the climb is steady rather than severe and it does eventually deposit us close to the fence that leads us towards Fair Snape Fell, our main desination for the day.
In the mist/fog that I did my recce in the other day, I never actually found Fair Snape, although I'm condfident that with help of plenty of other pairs of eyes, and better viewing conditions, that we'll manage to locate it today. Weather permitting, finding Parlick from here should be a doddle and once we've descended to Fell Foot, various options for our return to Chipping exist. We can use the road, long and laborious, or cross various (relatively muddy) fields as preferred.
Maybe we'll see what the conditions are like on Sunday before committing ourselves one way or t'other ...
8/1/2017 - CATON

B WALK for the 8th January 2017

CATON

Leader Peter Rossall

Distance 7¼ miles / 11½ km

Ascent (total) 1,017ft / 310m

Time 4¾ hours

Sunset Time 16:12

Map OL41 Forest of Bowland and Ribblesdale

Start Grid Ref : SD567665


Happy new year everyone, hope you've all enjoyed a good break and not succumbed to 'the lurgy' (sadly I'm aware that quite a few of you have been affected).
For our first walk of the year, a day that will also see us enjoying our Xmas meal, I've decided to take things very easily with a short walk, with not much climbing, and about 40% of it on tarmac......so not a great deal to commend it really!, but it'll be a nice 'loosener' for harder walks that will follow later in the year.
Glad to be back, here's what I've got for you.
Pete.
A happy new year to one and all with the hope that you've all enjoyed a wonderful time over the festive period... and obviously not over indulged on the grub and booze (as if you would!!!!). Just in case any of us have, I've arranged a very easy walk for today that should be just enough to build up an appetite for our Xmas lunch later in the day. Glad to be back, feels like it was years ago since we were last together.
Starting from Claughton, we take the minor road opposite the Fenwick Arms, climbing steadily with the road eventually becoming a bridleway. Just past Moorcock Hall we'll meet Quarry Road, a road that as the name suggests use to serve the Quarries but, because they're now disused, the road now serves the Caton Moor Wind Farm. A path is available to walk through the wind farm although it brings you back to the same spot so, instead we'll take the path that runs east on the outside of these windmills, passing by the summit of Caton Moor/Whit Moor prior to turning right onto Roeburndale Road.
Basically its all down hill from here. Sadly its mostly on tarmac (approximately 40% of this walk uses the road) which will make for easy, if a little boring, progress. That said, I'd no desire to make our first walk of the year difficult but I can promise you that this easiness wont last!
We do leave the road to cross a couple of fields just before reaching our destination of Caton where you'll be able to enjoy an odd aperitif or two, or use the time available to get togged up in your best party frocks and dinner suits.
Good to be back.

2016

11/12/2016 - AMBLESIDE

B WALK for the 11th December 2016

AMBLESIDE

Leader - Peter Rossall

Distance 6½ miles / 10½ km

Ascent (total) 1,581ft / 482m

Time 4½ to 5 Hours

Sunset Time 15:52

Map The English Lakes OL7 - south eastern area

Start Grid Ref : SD413987


'Ow do everyone,
As described in my 'brief' walk description - I'm sure you're all aware that I don't fo brief - I'm planning to do our usual very easy December walk from Windermere to Ambleside via Orrest Head, Troutbeck and Wansfell Pike.
With the route I'm going to take, if there's anyone who'd rather not go over Wansfell, the option is available to split from the group and take our usual low level route, passing by Jenkin Crag, with the navigation being easy.
The weather forecast is looking decent with no appreciable rain currently expected. It may be a bit breezy at lower levels making it blowy at or close to the summit of the Pike. Doubtless John will have a further option and there may also be other options from either David Wood and/or Les Holt.
One further option that is available is David Clegg's 'P' walk - P standing for pub, I think - which will start with a hearty breakfast somewhere in Ambleside prior to visiting several Museums, Art Galleries, Outdoor Equipment emporiums and ... oh no that's wrong, his crowd will be visiting several Hostelries, taking on board some refreshments at each one (sounds good to me ... wonder if I can jump ship?).
Finally, as this is our last walk of 2016, please can I thank you for the pleasure of your company and wish you all a great Christmas and new year with the fervent hope that John and myself, and indeed David Wood and Les, who've both led plenty of alternative walks during this last 12 months, can continue to both challenge and please you with what we arrange. See you on Sunday, or in the new year if you're unavailable this weekend.
Pete
Eight years on from being given the job of leading the B group, I think I'm finally beginning to get the hang of (most parts) of it, although I'm not infallible ha ha, as if you needed me to remind you of that. Repeating walks, or certain parts of them, definitely helps and today we're doing a walk that I must have done five or six times in those eight years, so I should be able to do it without my map, although I'll bring it with me just in case!. To add a little bit of newness to our walk I propose to approach or depart a couple of spots from a different angle than we previously have.
Leaving the coach close to the Tourist Information Centre in Windermere, we'll head across the road and take the popular signposted route to Orrest Head, a summit that, despite its lack of height, is a wonderful vantage point for our morning coffee break.
Those who've been here with me before so that's plenty of you will know the way from here but, here's my first alteration as I've decided that we'll take a route from the summit down towards Common Wood, a route that we've climbed up previously. After crossing a wall stile we turn left and follow the path to meet the minor road at Near Orrest, rejoining the path that we usually take.
A short stretch of road walking followed by a few (usually) muddy fields brings us to Far Orrest, continuing on to reach the A592 road. A small section of pavement walking brings us to the path that heads downhill to cross Trout Beck via the double footbridges before climbing up the valleys western side to eventually reach Holbeck Lane and then Robin Lane.
Here's where we undertake our second new bit of today's route. Our usual route takes us past High Skelghyll Farm and Jenkin Crag to end shortly afterwards in Ambleside - an option that is still available for anyone who doesn't wish to climb Wansfell but, for those of us who do, we'll continue along Hundreds Road track before it runs out and we take the permitted path across what I believe is some fairly boggy ground. Eventually it meets the main path leading from Troutbeck to Wansfell Pike and we join this and head uphill to the summit (our 2nd visit to this spot this year), taking in the views of the Ill Bell ridge, Red Screes, Fairfield Horseshoe and Windermere lake before heading down to finish in Ambleside.
Finally, as today is our final walk of the year, please may I thank everybody for their support, and patience, during my many mistakes this year, whether they be navigational or concerning personnel on Ferrys! and to wish you all a merry Christmas and a happy new year.
27/11/2016 - CARTMEL

B WALK for the 27th November 2016

CARTMEL

Leader - Peter Rossall

Distance 8¾ miles / 14 km

Ascent (total) 735ft / 224m

Time 5 Hours

Sunset Time 16:00

Map The English Lakes OL7 - south eastern area

Start Grid Ref : SD443828


Hi one and all,
We have the promise of decent weather for our walk this Sunday with a light breeze and the possibility of a little sunshine. Our major problem in the 'B' group may be boredom as I've tried increasing the length of our walk - and have done - although it means that it now includes great swathes of Tarmac walking, so if nothing else, it'll be easy ... but a bit dull.
Obviously I'm not sure what John has in mind - or anybody else for that matter - but here's what I've got for you.
Pete.
In my dozen years with this club, today marks only our third visit to Cartmel in that time. Our last visit was as long ago as, well last year actually!, albeit that it was February of last year so it's almost two years ago. Anyway, I've decided to loosely repeat the walk we did on that day although as that walk was only 6½ miles I've tacked on a little bit of (very) easy walking at the start. I'd actually considered starting earlier (by Sampool Bridge) and following the Cumbria Coastal Way but that would have put our mileage up to 11½ miles which is very definitely A group territory.
Leaving the coach on the A590 by the bus stop just after the turn off for Ulpha, we follow the minor road towards the village. Having passed Ulpha Fell, a rather grandiose title for a lump that rises by less than 100ft above us, we meet the aforementioned Cumbria Coastal Way as we pass Meatham and Lowther Meatham prior to crossing the railway where we have the salt marshes of the Kent Estuary as our companion before arriving, on foot, at Grange-over-Sands Railway Station.
We're over half way now and depending on the weather and the time, I may decide to stop and have lunch in the park next door to the station. Whether we've eaten or not, our next task is to ascend through Eggerslack Wood to Hampsfell where we'll visit its summit Hospice as this usually affords fantastic 360 degree views.
All that's left is to head down to Cartmel just over two miles away where we pass the village's famous Race Course before we all pile into the Sticky Toffee Pudding shop. Alternatively for those who are like me and not overly keen on puddings, there are three pubs to interest us ... oh and a café as well.
13/11/2016 - TODMORDEN

B WALK for the 13th November 2016

TODMORDEN

Leader - Peter Rossall

Distance very approximately 7½ miles / 12km

Ascent (total) Not 100% sure, but there'll be a few ups and downs

Time 5 Hours

Sunset Time 16:17

Map South Pennines OL21

Start Grid Ref : SD875295


Hi everyone,
sorry its late but, better late than not at all. After my non appearance last time, I've been waiting for confirmation that I could join you all and thankfully, for me rather more so than you, I can.
Having decided to forego the delights of Stoodley Pike I was surprised, albeit pleasantly so, to discover that John had also had similar thoughts to myself and is doing a walk using a great deal of the same area... though obviously his "road runners" will be travelling much faster than us, and also plonking on a few extra miles for good measure and, if as John indicates, the amount of paths available to both him and me make navigation a bit 'testing', there's plenty of scope for either of us to inadvertantly add a few extra miles on if we make a mistake! (hee hee, as if that would ever happen!...).
Anyway, here's what I'm proposing to do, relatively easy with seemingly no big climbs (although there may be a few short ups and downs) which will hopefully deposit us in Todmorden ready for our trip home.
After my absence last time out, thanks are duly accorded to Les for leading you around Settle, and at very short notice I must add, with me imagining that you all thoroughly enjoyed yourselves. On to today and a visit to Todmorden, or its close neighbour Hebden Bridge, usually means a walk to the wonderful Stoodley Pike but, because we've been there on umpteen occasions, I thought that we'd have a change today and so instead I've picked a linear route that has plenty of scope for us to be on the wrong path, although there's that many paths that depending on which ones we take will determine just how far we travel, that said, I'm fairly certain that whether as intended or not, we'll eventually end up in Todmorden, well hopefully anyway.
Alighting from the coach on the A646 at Holme Chapel in the Cliviger Gorge, we head uphill immediately along the Pennine Bridleway before veering right onto the path that crosses Black Scout.
Once across this part of the route our way may become slightly less clear as an abundance of paths (named and otherwise) fight for our attention. The Calderdale Way, The Burnley Way, The Todmorden Centenary Way and the Mary Townley Loop all cover parts of the areas that we'll be treading (PS: my map of this area is old and its possible that stretches of those four named walks use the same paths at times). It should be an adventure if nothing else.
16/10/2016 - HAWKSHEAD

B WALK for the 16th October 2016

HAWKSHEAD

Leader - Peter Rossall

Distance 9½ miles / 15¼ km

Ascent (total) 1017ft / 310m

Time 5½ to 6 hours

Sunset Time 18:12

Map OL7 The English Lakes (South-eastern area)

Start Grid Ref : SD414987


Hi folks,
It looks like the weather is not going to be as delightful for us this Sunday as it was for me last Sunday - when I reccied this walk - although it's not a total washout. We've got the threat of a bit of light rain and some breeziness, although we should have the wind at our backs for a great deal of the day and, because we're not going to any great height, the (possible) wind and rain shouldn't cause us any major problems.
As for the walk itself, it's a relatively easy "stroll in the park", albeit that it does have some wonderful views.
See you on Sunday.
Pete
Today we'll enjoy that's compulsory by the way! a pleasant, fairly easy, stroll around the outskirts of Windermere before using the Ferry to cross the lake and continue our stroll in and around Claife Heights, passing the newly refurbished Claife Viewing Station and three tarns as we head towards Latterbarrow and ultimately Hawkshead. Not much in the way of any great height to be gained today although fantastic views all day long are assured.
We begin from the A591 close to Windermere Railway Station before heading towards Alice Howe from where we follow the path that we've trodden on many previous occasions, crossing the rail line, prior to skirting around the outer edges of Windermere town as we make our way towards the Promenade in Bowness-on-Windermere, continuing on to Ferry Nab where, as the name suggests, we catch the Ferry.
Be careful of the vehicles as you leave the ferry as we follow the narrow road for a short while prior to reaching a lakeside footpath that takes us to Claife Viewing Station (we've been here before, but it's been tarted up and now has so much more about it than on previous visits). Great views and picture opportunities are available.
We'll continue uphill towards Far Sawrey which strangely is closer than Near Sawrey!, although I suppose if you're travelling the other way, then they're named correctly where we'll pass the Cuckoo Brow pub which may just make a suitable spot to stop for lunch. Shortly after the pub a bridleway off to the right takes us our first tarn (Moss Eccles) and this is quickly followed by the Tarns of Wise Een and High Moss. More importantly, great views are to be had, starting from the Coniston range on our left and taking in the Langdale Pikes and the Fairfield Horshoe as well.
All that's left is to ascend Latterbarrow for even better views of the ranges detailed above with our extra height also bringing Red Screes, the Ill Bell ridge and the Howgills into view. A steep descent, a small section of road and a few fields brings us Hawkshead and its many delights.
02/10/2016 - WHALEY BRIDGE

B WALK for the 2nd October 2016

WHALEY BRIDGE

Leader - Peter Rossall

Distance 9½ miles / 15¼ km

Ascent (total) 1194ft / 364m

Time 6 hours

Sunset Time 18:45

Maps OL1 & OL24 The Peak District (Dark & White Peak areas)

Start Grid Ref : SK011815


Hello everybody,
As most of you are probably aware, Linda and John are away this weekend. In their absence Les will be leading the 'A' walk. My offering for the 'B' group, which is similar in many ways to the 'A' walk, although its alternative enough to make a difference, and we'll be going slower than those 'A' group 'road-runners ...
Just had a look at the weather for the Whaley Bridge area of Derbyshire for Sunday and we're being promised very light winds and sunshine. "Hmmm!"... Past history tells me that weather forecasts this far in advance have a habit of changing quite a bit so for anyone who fancies having a dip in some of the reservoirs both the 'A' and 'B' groups will be passing, I wouldn't dig out your swimming cossie just yet.
See you on Sunday.
Pete
As a club we've only visited this area once previously and I imagine that a few of you will never have been here before so, hopefully the walk I've selected ticks all the right boxes. It's not overly strenuous with no big ascents, although it does have enough ups and downs to have an impact.
We start from the centre of Whaley Bridge where clean public toilets are available before heading under the bridge adjacent to the train station, keeping left when the road bends right to follow Reservoir Road uphill. Shortly we reach the dammed wall of Toddbrook Reservoir with a view along the full length of the reservoir and I'm sure that the photographers amongst you will be snapping away merrily.
Originally we were to follow the footpath along the right hand side of the water for its full length (as we'd done previously) although a reconnoitre last week proved that this option is no longer available, so, instead we'll start along the footpath before using a footbridge to cross Todd Brook, to reacquaint ourselves with Reservoir Road. Another stretch of road walking past some pretty expensive looking properties brings us to a footpath heading uphill to the right, a path that deposits us on a minor road by Toddbrook Farm from where we'll head downhill, very steeply at times, including a section of cobbled road, to arrive at Kishfield Bridge.
We leave the road here and follow a path signposted Gap House, a property that sits by the B5470 road. We cross the road to take the minor road (not to Clayton Fold) as we make our way inextricably to our high point of the day, although that's still quite a distance away and the gradients are relatively gentle as we pass Taxal Edge and Windgather Rocks, where I suggest we have lunch as this should allow us to view the rock climbers as they head up and abseil down the rocks.
Suitably fed and watered, we'll continue south, climbing down into a fold before hitting more tarmac, although once again it's only a short stretch. A stone stile some 300 yards along the road takes us off the road and back onto muddy paths, which I'm sure you all prefer?. The path sees us reach the junction of roads by the Pym Chair and here's where we turn for home. This begins with a long downhill stretch on a roadside path alongside the Street (a Roman Road) before leaving the road to follow a wooded footpath which is very steep and sees us arrive by Fernilee Reservoir. This leaves us with a pleasant walk alongside the reservoir and through the Goyt valley before we eventually arrive on the outskirts of Whaley Bridge with us once again passing Toddbrook Reservoir on our way into the town.
18/09/2016 - SEDBERGH

B WALK for the 18th September 2016

SEDBERGH

Leader - Peter Rossall

Distance 8½ miles / 13¾ km

Ascent (total) 1650ft / 503m

Time 6 hours

Sunset Time 19:20

Map OL19 The Howgill Fells

Start Grid Ref : SD713978


Hello everyone,
After our recent mini heatwave has passed it looks like we'll get pleasant enough weather for walking in, albeit that we may be in low cloud at our highest point this weekend. Any rain is threatening to arrive later in the day although, because there's 48 hours to go before we turn up, there's a chance that it may alter. Here's hoping.
I will be leading the 'B' group on a particular favourite of mine, and what seems like an almost annual ascent of Cautley Spout, please feel free to join me if you wish.
Pete
It's fair to say that this walk is the most regularly undertaken trek that the B group have done since I started leading them in October 2008, with today being the fourth time that we'll have used this route. It includes climbing England's highest above ground waterfall Cautley Spout - although, because it falls in five separate cascades, you may have been informed that there are larger single drop waterfalls and that is correct. We've done it previously in various weather conditions, snow and ice on one occasion, scorchingly hot on another. I don't anticipate either of those climatic conditions will prevail this time out. All told it's a relatively easy walk, although it does include one of the steeper climbs that we ever do.
We begin our walk at Rawthey Bridge on the A683, approximately 5½ miles north east of Sedbergh and start easily, following the footpath along the north west side of the River Rawthey before joining a bridleway that we follow to Narthwaite Farm. After crossing Backside Beck we contour around the lower slopes of Ben End which eventually brings the imposing Cautley Crag into view with further right higher up the valley, the waterfall of Cautley Spout, our steep climb.
We follow Cautley Beck, gently increasing our height prior to arriving at the foot of the waterfall and the steep bit!. It starts out on a grassy path before becoming a rocky stepped path. As you're ascending keep having a breather and, don't forget to constantly look back as the views are tremendous and eventually, the top (of the waterfall) will be reached. The climbing isn't quite over yet, although it does get far less severe as we pull up onto the Calf, which at 2,218ft (676mtrs) is the highest point of the Howgill Fells.
Leaving the Calf, we head south east initially, passing Calders, before turning south west and traversing Rowantree Grains, continuing across the shoulder of Arant Haw prior to heading left towards our destination of Sedbergh before we reach Winder (which rhymes with cinder), leaving that hill for another day maybe.
04/09/2016 - POOLEY BRIDGE

B WALK for the 4th September 2016

GLENRIDDING to POOLEY BRIDGE via AIRA FORCE

Leader - Peter Rossall

Distance 9.25 miles / 15 km

Ascent (total) 810ft / 247m

Time 5 to 5½ hours

Sunset Time 19:54

Map OL5 The English Lakes (North eastern area)

Start Grid Ref : NY386172


'Ow do everyone,
I'm on the ball and rather early with my offering this week which means that the weather aspect is a bit 'up in the air'. Supposedly we may get a little light rain, but it won't be cold and us 'B' groupers won't be going to any great heights anyway.
Quite a long walk for us, although not particularly strenuous and, for a change we finish in Pooley Bridge, a place I've never visited, although I believe that it's very nice. See you on Sunday.
Pete
Having enjoyed the ride over the Kirkstone Pass, we'll commence our walk from Glenridding and enjoy a leisurely walk along the shoreline of Ullswater for about a mile and a half before we head uphill to view the wonderful Aira Force waterfall.
Weather permitting we'll have a morning stop here (you'll want to take pictures you see, so having a break makes perfect sense) before we head away from the falls and gently uphill, with views across and along Ullswater becoming enhanced as we get higher. Down below us should be Lyulphs Tower, supposedly visited often by William Wordsworth, with this area being recognised as the inspiration for probably his best known *poem.
Continuing along the balcony footpath of Gowbarrow Fell we pass through Swinburns Wood and below Priests Crag before arriving at the quaint little village of Bennethead (passing through here with John's A group many years ago we encountered a red squirrel, so keep your eyes peeled).
Leaving the village we take to field paths again, passing close by Maiden Castle (not much of a castle actually!) before being deposited in a caravan park!. A couple of fields sees us back to the main A592 road, the road that we started from, just by the turn off to Pooley Bridge and half a mile later we finish in Pooley Bridge itself, a place I've never been to, although I believe that it's lovely.
* Wordsworth poem, I'm sure you all know it.
I wandered lonely as a cloud,
That floats on high o'er vales and hills,
When all at once I saw a crowd,
A host of golden daffodils,
Beside the lake, beneath the trees,
Fluttering and dancing in the breeze.
William Wordsworth
24/07/2016 - KESWICK

B WALK for the 24th July 2016

KESWICK (via the Lakes)

Leader - Peter Rossall

Distance 8.5 miles / 13.8 km

Ascent (total) 1,425ft / 434m

Time 5½ to 6 hours

Sunset Time 21:21

Maps OL5 (a tiny bit at the start) & OL4 The English Lakes

Start Grid Ref : NY317194


Hi all,
Looks like we'll have to cope with a bit of rain again... but at least it's summer so it'll be warm rain (every cloud and all that). Any rain that we get may have a detrimental effect on the viewing conditions although the further north you are (and we're almost as far north as the Lake District goes) the higher the cloud should be. Let's hope it doesn't effect our day too much. Here's what the 'B' group have to look forward to. See you all tomorrow.
Pete
Our second trip to the Keswick area this year sees us visiting places that we've been to before, but we're revisiting them because they're nice, and challenging, though not too challenging.
We'll leave the coach close to Smaithwaite Bridge on the A591 before following the minor road that passes by the Manchester Corporation reservoir (Thirlmere) with Raven Crag directly ahead of us looking very imposing and unclimbable without the aid of ropes. Thankfully for us there is a path, albeit that it's very steep, however it only lasts for about 950ft.so a bit of a doddle really!.
The views from the top down the full length of Thirlmere and (hopefully) over to the Helvellyn range are well worth the effort and, as a bonus, that's all the strenuous work done for the day. We locate a forest track which we follow north, and downhill, to eventually reach the A591 again. Crossing the road with High Rigg above us, we make our way round to St. Johns in the Vale Church at the northern foot of High Rigg, before heading up and over Low Rigg to visit Tewet Tarn, a tarn that we've been to on numerous occasions previously.
Leaving the tarn we're headed for another oft visited Lakeland spot, the Castlerigg Stone Circle (not sure if the weather will warrant us paying a visit to the Ice Cream van that usually makes a fortune from the tourists that visit this spot!) before we head into the built up areas of Keswick, utilising the disused rail line as a means of freeing ourselves from the traffic.
Keswick with its array of cafés, outdoor shops and pubs offers us plenty of opportunities to chill out before we head for home, hopefully having had another enjoyable day out.
10/07/2016 - REETH

B WALK for the 10th July 2016

REETH

Leader - Peter Rossall

Distance 7½ miles / 12 km

Ascent (total) 1,073ft / 327m

Time 5 to 5½ hours

Sunset Time 21:38

Map OL30 Yorkshire Dales northern & central areas

Start Grid Ref : SE037993


Hi folks, sorry its late but here's what the 'B' group will be doing this Sunday, providing you're not pre-occupied with Andy Murray partaking in (and hopefully winning) the Mens Single Title at Wimbledon or, more importantly, watching those crazy cyclists (my heroes) in the Tour de France slogging over the Col du Tourmalet (which is more than twice the height of Helvellyn!!!!!) and three other big lumps on their way to Paris via a circuit of France.
As John has indicated, the weather is promising to be a combination of sunshine and showers, some of which may be heavy, although the temperature is expected to be relatively warm and humid.
We've had worse, and we can see the Tennis and Cycling when we arrive home, so see you all on Sunday.
Pete
Reeth... where's that? I hear you say. Well it's in Swaledale in the Yorkshire Dales and it's lovely. Its also six years since we last came here so it was well overdue a visit.
Quite a long journey (hence the single pick up start) finally deposits us in Reeth centre where a pretty village green (and decent public conveniences) are available. Having availed ourselves of the latter we'll make our way down to the river (Arkle Beck) which we follow south along the western bank. We cross the river by Reeth Bridge and turn north to follow the river upstream, all the time in the shadow of our high spot for the day, Fremington Edge, up to our right.
Although our path loosely follows Arkle Beck, it does climb away from the river at times, rising and falling as it does so. We pass by Heggs House and upon reaching Storthwaite Hall, we turn right here to begin the ascent past the lead quarries and onto Fremington Edge itself.
Having attained our high point at 1551ft / 473m (high above Heggs House), we continue alongside the wall as we very gently head downhill for the next mile or so, eventually reaching the track that leads past the White House to the village of Fremington and finally back into Reeth where cafes and public houses await our custom with a typical Yaaarksher warmth.
26/06/2016 - BUTTERMERE

B WALK for the 36th June 2016

BUTTERMERE

Leader - Peter Rossall

Distance 6½ miles / 10½km

Ascent (total) 1,489ft / 454m

Time 5 to 5½ hours

Sunset Time 21:45

Map OL4 The English Lakes - north western area

Start Grid Ref : NY157220


Morning all,
Hi everyone, first things first - although I'm sure you're all aware - but we're on another one pick up/drop off this Sunday - 8am at Four Lane Ends, although on the plus side, its looking like we'll have better weather in and around Buttermere than our friends from Fylde Coast Ramblers enjoyed last weekend, seems like its our turn for decent weather this time out, all a bit swings and roundabouts really, don't ya just love the British summer?. Because John and Linda are away, Les will be leading the 'A' walk and he's sent me a copy of what he'll be doing with a brief description below. The attachment above also shows his route planned out on a map. As for the 'B' walk, having done both Fleetwith Pike and Haystacks in the last two years, though not as one walk (well, some of the 'speed merchants' in our group actually incorporated both mountains in the same walk but, for the majority, it was our usual stroll over one fell) andf this year we'll be repeating a walk from 2010 that sees us go up and over Mellbreak. Not sure up to press if there'll be any other 'splinter groups' doing alternative walks, although this area gives us lots of opportunities. One last thing, because we'll using the Cafe's car park in Buttermere, John had asked that we could spend some time, and more importantly money, in the cafe and making the cafe owners/staff aware that we're off the coach. See you all on Sunday,
Pete
Todays walk is not a particularly long one although it does have one steep ascent and descent and, because it generally takes us a long time to get to and from Buttermere, our available walking time is relatively short in spite of the long daylight hours at this time of year. Despite not being one of this areas giants, Mellbreak does reward your efforts with superb views of the higher fells all around us.
We start our walk at Beck House, Brackenthwaite, on the B5289, three miles short of Buttermere village. We head due west to meet the minor road that takes us to Loweswater village which is overlooked by Mellbreak, our fell for the day.
Here commences our major climb, some 1300ft of it, though as ever it's not a race and there's no prize for first to the top. Take your time and enjoy the constantly changing views. Mellbreak is one of those fells that has a flattish top with two summits - one north, one south - with a small depression between the two. We reach the north summit first (at 1,669ft / 509m) from where we gently drop down 200ft before climbing 210ft to the southern summit at 1,679ft / 512m.
Our ridge provides us with lovely views of the Mosedale valley to the west (our right) and the lakes of Loweswater (behind us), Crummock Water (to our left) and Buttermere (ahead of us beyond Crummock Water) with Fleetwith Edge, very definitely one of the most instantly recognisable fells in the whole of Lakeland, at it's far end. We descend as steeply as we had earlier climbed before making our way towards Scale Force waterfall prior to heading downhill towards the strip of land that separates the two lakes on our way to Buttermere village where the café, the Bridge Hotel, the Fish Hotel and our transport await us.
12/06/2016 - CHURCH STRETTON

B WALK for the 12th June 2016

CHURCH STRETTON (Shropshire Hills AONB)

Leader - Peter Rossall

Distance 7½ miles / 12km

Ascent (total) 1,817ft / 554m

Time 4½ hours

Sunset Time 21:37

Maps 41 Shrewsbury & 217 The Long Mynd & Wenlock Edge

Start Grid Ref : SJ484006


Hi all,
After our trip to Church Stretton last year proved such a success for the few who ventured out to this new area for us, it was decided - by a democratic vote at the AGM - to visit it again this year, ostensibly because club stalwarts Linda and John Adams missed last years trip, but also because those few who did make last years trip thoroughly enjoyed it and informed the missing few just what a beautiful area they'd missed out on. It did also happen to be a wonderfully sunny and warm day as well and that may have swayed peoples opinions. Sadly I can't promise weather* that pleasant for this Sunday, but I'm sure that as always we'll cope with whatever comes our way. Because the 'B' walk that I laid on last year (thanks to some local knowledge from my Brother-in-Law) proved so popular, I've decided to repeat last years walk once again. Don't forget, it's a single pick-up so see you all at Four Lane Ends, Thornton at 8am on Sunday.
Pete.
*The forecasted weather is showing that we may have some light rain, some drizzle, some thundery showers and some sunshine ... so quite a mish-mash, although it's still indicating that it will be pleasantly warm, but thankfully without the unbearable heat that we've enjoyed over the last fortnight or so.
The club had never visited this area until July last year and yet, it proved extremely popular with the few who decided to make the trip, with both the 'A' and 'B' groups enjoying stunning walks in glorious countryside. A very pleasant day weatherwise may also have had a bearing on everyone's delight of this area, with the result that we find ourselves here again 11 months later.
Starting from the lay by bus stop on the A49 just south of Dorrington, we'll follow the road through the sleepy village of Longnor to arrive at Bentley Fold Farm. A couple of fields lead us back to the road which we follow for a short while before starting our first ascent onto the Lawley.
By 'B' group standards, this is quite a pull up. It's only about 700ft but has lots of those annoying false summits ... but, because we're not in a race, take your time and enjoy the 360 degree views. North across the flat and very fertile Shropshire plain, complete with its fields of crops. Eastwards to Wenlock Edge and Brown Clee Hill (Shropshire's highest point), south to the Shropshire Hills with Caer Caradoc, our next target, immediately in front of us and westwards to Wales with (on a good day) views across to Snowdonia.
I propose to have lunch somewhere around the summit with us taking shelter from any breeze (if required) by dropping a few feet from the ridge path. Suitably refreshed, and having gorged on the glorious views, we'll reacquaint ourselves with the ridge path and drop quickly downhill to Comley Farm before a small stretch of road walking brings us to the path that we'll follow along the ridge to Caer Caradoc's summit.
Again, wonderful views abound - the Long Mynd looks great from here - and we can see the town of Church Stretton below us. All down hill from here, and very very steeply so take care.
Church Stretton itself has quite a rich history and is a lovely town with lots of shops, café's and pubs, so a pleasant end to what I hope has been a great day for you all. Here's to another club visit to this lovely area.
29/05/2016 - BROUGHTON in FURNESS

B Group WALK for the 29th May 2016

BROUGHTON in FURNESS

Leader - Peter Rossall

8 miles / 12.7 km

Ascent (total) 874ft / 205m

Time 4¾ hours

Sunset Time 21:28

Map: OL6 The English Lakes - south western area

Start Grid Ref : SD280854


Hi Folks,
Sorry it's late but I'd been umming and aahing as to what to do - having decided that Black Combe was very definitely an 'A' walk rather than a 'B' walk, which is a shame because it's a great fell and in tomorrows decent weather (provided the forecast doesn't suddenly change) it should offer a magnificent walk. I've no wish to put anyone off and if any of my usual group fancy joining the 'A' group, I know that John will look after you far better than I ever could. For those of us looking for something a little more sedate, here's what I've got. See you all tomorrow,
We'll leave the coach at Wood Gate on the A5092 before taking the path opposite heading due north towards Kendall Ground where we join the Cumbria Way. Climbing gently we head to Kiln Bank, quickly followed by Tottlebank Farm. Here we remain on the Cumbria Way as we head towards Beacon Tarn - some of you may remember that Tarn from earlier in the year when you were here, but without me!. This time we're not actually going to the Tarn as we head west towards High Kep and Spunham Wood.
We eventually reach the minor road just by its junction with the Woodland Fell road (we've walked down the fell road a time or two in years gone by) and we head south for a short stretch before cutting through a wooded area towards Thornthwaite and Woodland Hall. The path separates here and we've always taken the left hand fork, but today I suggest that we take the right hand fork as this will 'add to our day' by giving us a gentle 120ft ascent because after all, we've not done a great deal of climbing today have we?. Anyone who doesn't fancy this small climb can of course take the left hand fork as both paths converge in a short distance.
Over a stile and through a field brings us to a spot that is steeped in Wyre Ramblers folklore!!!!!, although I'm not anticipating anything of the nature that we had in November 2013 when two of our fair maidens became greatly distressed - caused by a bit of stagnant rainwater! - although as is (hopefully) always the case, two of our male counterparts came to their rescue and guided our 'damsels in distress' through the FOUR INCH DEEP PUDDLE [ I kid you not! ] that lay in front of them.
A few fields and some minor road walking sees us enter Broughton in Furness from the north east. The coach should be parked in Station Road and various pubs and cafes await our custom.
15/05/2016 - ILKLEY via OTLEY

B Group WALK for the 15th May 2016

OTLEY TO ILKLEY

Leader - Peter Rossall

10 miles / 16.2 km

Ascent (total) 994ft / 303m

Time 5½ hours

Sunset Time 21:07

Map: Explorer 297 - Lower Wharfedale & Washburn Valley

Start Grid Ref : SE202455


Hi y'all,
We're back in this lovely area for the first time in SIX years. Sorry that the weather isn't planning to play ball with us this weekend - it's not that bad, just not the wonderful spell that we've had recently, although on the plus side, walking in a heat wave isn't all that pleasant anyway ...
The 'B' group have 'nicked' a walk that was previously done as an 'A' walk by John because it's relatively easy! ... hmmm, I don't think John ever does easy does he?. I do hope that John wasn't planning to repeat this walk this time or us 'B' groupers will be struggling to keep up with the 'road-runners' (beep beep!).
Here's what I've got. See you all on Sunday.
Pete.
This weekend us 'B' walkers stray into 'A' walk territory as we follow a route led previously [as an 'A' walk] by John Adams, albeit that it's an easy walk by the usual standards of 'A walks ... I'm sure you'll all let me know whether its acceptable as a 'B' walk once we've finished.
We begin from Otley town centre before heading downhill to cross the river Wharfe via Otley Bridge. We then head uphill along Billam's Hill Road passing a Hospital on our left prior to turning left into a residential estate. A right turn eventually brings us to a fingerpost that guides us between two houses and out into the countryside. We continue through various fields, all the time heading uphill, although not particularly steeply.
We eventually reach a minor road which we follow uphill to reach the hamlet of Clifton. Turning left here we now head gently downhill over the next mile and a half before we reach another road (Hallam Lane) before turning north (right) to head to Grassgarth Farm. More fields require negotiating as we head to Town Head which we'll pass through in quick time.
Our next target is Scales House farm on our way through more fields and woods before we have more tarmac to tread (Smithy Lane) which leads us to the village of Denton. We turn right into Denton Rd before finding a track off to the left which takes us along the boundary of West Park Wood, from where eventually we'll find ourselves above the village of Middleton. More minor road work ensues as we take the right hand fork in the road before walking along Slates Lane to the footpath down into Coppy Woods and the highlight of this walk, its wonderful display of bluebells.
Lastly we pass by the old swimming pool then down to the riverside. Having crossed the River Wharfe you will find the coach near the Riverside Hotel and associated café, no doubt you'll be ready for whatever refreshments are on offer.
01/05/2016 - PIKE OF BLISCO

B Group WALK for the 1st May 2016

PIKE of BLISCO

Leader - Peter Rossall

Distance 7½ miles / 12 km

Ascent (total) 2,194ft / 669m

Time 5½ hours

Sunset Time 20:43

O OL6 The English Lakes - South Western Area

Start Grid Ref : NY294064


Hello all,
I'm on the ball this week (for a change) as I'm planning to do a walk that we last attempted in 2013. It's very early yet to be 100% about the weather although it's looking like the Lake District may receive some snow during this week. Not sure if there'll be any left, or falling on the day, by the time Sunday comes around but, weather permitting, here's what I'm looking to do for the 'B' group.
John usually arranges a 'monster' walk for this area and I wouldn't be surprised if he comes up with something long, or strenuous, or both! ... and of course we may also have offerings from Les and David to interest you as well.
See you on Sunday.
Doubtless lots of you will have heard tales - often told by me - of the day that we had to call out an Air Ambulance for one of our number when we were very close to the top of Pike of Blisco during a trip to the Langdale valley in May 2013. Indeed quite a few of you will have been there on the day itself and will no doubt remember that because of our 'incident', we never actually completed our walk that day. I'd planned to take 'the patient' back to complete the walk the following year - and she was happy to do that - although sadly on that day, the weather was atrocious so we decided to forego the delights of Pike of Blisco once again.
Our "Helicopter Girl" is currently recovering from more problems with her knee (though this time its her 'good one'!!!!) and is due back with us next time out, so I feel relatively safe in repeating our walk from three years ago (I hope those words don't come back to haunt me).
We commence our walk from the car park by Stickle Barn by heading across the road and Great Langdale Beck to reach Side House before heading west towards the road that runs between Great and Little Langdale. Crossing the road at its high point we've the path from Blea Tarn off to our left and we'll be using that later, but for now we're heading right to make acquaintance with the path that loosely follows Redacre Gill.
Steadily uphill for approximately 1800ft until we reach Pike of Blisco's summit at 2312ft for what I hope will be super views all around. 600ft below us is Red Tarn and that's our next destination as we begin our homeward journey. Once the tarn is reached we'll turn south west to cross Redtarn Moss on our way gently downhill until we arrive at the summit of the Wrynose pass road at the Three Shire Stone, this being until 1974 the boundary between the counties of Lancashire, Cumberland and Westmorland.
A bit of road walking follows as we head very steeply downhill prior to taking the footpath across Blea Moss once the gradient has eased. Our path takes us past Blea Tarn before a gentle uphill section brings us back to our road crossing of earlier today. From here, we've just over a mile to go, starting with a steep downhill section before going through the campsite down in the valley and passing the Old Dungeon Ghyll Hotel and walking across a number of (flat) fields to end up back where we started.
I'm sure that 'Helicopter Girl' would have enjoyed herself today ... but on second thoughts, maybe the memory is still too vivid.
17/04/2016 - CALDBECK

B Group WALK for the 17th April 2016

CALDBECK

Leader - Peter Rossall

Distance 8 miles / 12.8 km

Ascent (total) 1568 ft / 478 m

Time 5½ hours

Sunset Time 20:17

OL5 The English Lakes - North Eastern Area

Start Grid Ref : NY357379


This is an area that we don't visit often and because of that I considered repeating the walk that we did on the only occasion that we've been to Caldbeck since I started leading walks in 2008 but, because that walk in 2009 was only six and half miles long and had less than 600ft of ascent, I decided that you'd be most upset with something so easy so I've picked something a little more challenging, although by Lake District standards, it should still be fairly easy.
Starting from Wood House, just east of Hesket Newmarket, we'll make our way gently uphill via a number of fields to Calebreck from where we'll follow the bridleway that uses the Carrock Beck valley to ascend all the way to High Pike's summit (2,158ft / 658m) with tremendous views north to the Solway Firth hopefully available.
Whilst up here, keep on the lookout for an old man with a bushy grey beard and a dog and, if you see one, be respectful of him because it may be a Caldbeck resident who also happens to be Britain's most famous mountaineer, and no, I don't mean Alfred Wainwright, famous though he is. The person to whom I refer is Sir Chris Bonnington, a man who loves these fells even though he's climbed to the very top of the world and stood atop of Everest.
Whether we meet up with Sir Chris or not, it's all downhill from here, using the well trodden Cumbria Way to finish in Caldbeck from where we'll have ample time to sample the delights of either The Old Smithy Tearoom or The Oddfellows pub.
03/04/2016 - BRAITHWAITE

B Group WALK for the 3rd April 2016

BRAITHWAITE

Leader - Peter Rossall

Distance 8¼ miles / 13½ km

Ascent (total) 1413 ft / 431 m

Time 5½ hours

Sunset Time 19:52

OL4 The English Lakes - North western area

Start Grid Ref : NY264244


Hi all,
The weather for Sunday is not great, but not bad either ... Looks like we might get a mixed bag with some rain, a slight breeze, and no sunshine. Then again, it might be fabulous ... whatever the weather its always fabulous anyway ... isn't it?. The 'B' group won't be going to any great height although we're doing a very popular fell, so that should help weatherwise (ha ha, famous last words!). My own problem is that as of now - 2:20am on Saturday the 2nd April - I'm unsure if I've got to work on Sunday the 3rd of April. I'm hopeful that I'll be with you, but I never take it for granted.
Either way, here's what I had planned. If for some horrible reason I can't enjoy your company, please feel free to do whatever you want. Maybe there'll be a chance for our budding 'leaders' to have another go (that offer may be given even if I'm with you).
A washed away road has altered what would have been our trip to Keswick via Ambleside, Grasmere and Dunmail Raise. The road will be completely reopened in about a month or so, so instead, we've swapped our destinations with Braithwaite (next door to Keswick) being done today and our Keswick trip delayed until July. What that does give us is the chance to take on everyone's favourite little Lakeland fell. OK, I accept that that description may be over-egging the pudding but, Catbells is extremely popular. Hope you enjoy it.
I plan to leave the coach on the A66 by the Keswick roundabout from where we'll make our way through Portinscale to the foot of the ridge that leads up to Catbells. Steadily upwards and across Skelgill Bank before the summit of Catbells is reached. Views are usually great from here but the weather this Sunday may have other ideas. Here's hoping it's not too bad.
All the climbing done for the day! Believe that if you wish? ... we leave the summit and make our way to the crossroads of Hause Gate where we turn right to head downhill into the Newlands Valley. A bit of road walking between Skelgill and Stair brings us to the riverside path that follows Newlands Beck.
We'll cross the beck via the bridge to arrive in Uzzicar prior to enjoying a little more road walking (though thankfully not much) before a short rise takes us the foot of Barrow (the fell, not the town!) and onto Braithwaite Lodge.
Literally just-up-the-road is our final destination of Braithwaite. A café and a couple of pubs await our patronage.
As for the coach, that's parked a quarter of a mile away, just off the A66.
20/03/2016 - CASTLETON

B Group WALK for the 20th March 2016

CASTLETON

Leader - Peter Rossall

Distance 8 miles / 12¾ km

Ascent (total) 1375ft / 419m

Time 5½ hours

Sunset Time 18:26

OL1 - The Peak District (Dark Peak area)

Start Grid Ref : SK149829


First of all, apologies for doing a walk that as a group we've done three times previously, although the reason for repeating this walk again is that it's so flaming good! It includes walking Derbyshire's Great Ridge and can be done in either direction (and we have), although today we'll be walking it from west to east (because I was unavailable on the last occasion in 2011 that we did it in this direction).
Enjoy.
Starting from the car park in Castleton, we head through the market square to enter Cave Dale. After an initial fairly steep start the terrain soon levels out and a look up and to our right reveals the remains of Peveril Castle from where the village takes its name. Continuing uphill we eventually reach a high plateau where we turn sharp right to join a track followed by a further right turn 250 yards on. Rushup Edge and Mam Tor soon come into view with Mam Nick, the low ground between Rushup Edge (to the left) and Mam Tor (to the right) our destination.
I have a little detour planned though first as well head along the minor road to Winnats Head Farm in order to give us a view of the spectacular Winnats gorge, with the road snaking through it. Views, and pictures, taken in, we'll continue across Windy Knoll and up to Mam Nick prior to using the stepped path to the summit of Mam Tor itself, at 1696ft, our high point of the day. Hang-gliders use this spot as a launch pad and they can usually be found here most weekends. The ridge stretches out invitingly in front of us all the way to Lose Hill, two miles away.
The ridge falls and rises over its length with the low spot being Hollins Cross (where the old coffin route from Edale to Castleton crosses the ridge) and high spots at Barker Bank, Back Tor and Lose Hill (or Wards Piece*) before we head down towards Hope initially, passing by Losehill Farm and the Hollowford Centre to finish in Castleton where Cafés and pubs will be ready to refresh us.

* Named after George Herbert Bridges Ward who was a major protagonist in the war to open the fells for everybody, leading ultimately to the Mass Trespass by 2,000 people on Kinder Scout, just to the north of here across the Edale valley. For his efforts, Ward was eventually offered 54½ acres of Lose Hill (Wards Piece) and this land was handed over to the National Trust for safe keeping.
06/03/2016 - MARSDEN

B Group WALK for the 6th March 2016

MARSDEN

Leader - David Wood

Distance 9½ miles / 15¼ km

Ascent (total) 584ft / 178m

Time 5½ hours

Sunset Time 18:00

OL21 - South Pennines

Start Grid Ref: : SD988149


Hi all,
Work commitments mean that I'm unable to join you today (which is a shame for me, though not necessarily for you!) and so instead, I leave you in the capable hands of David Wood who I'm indebted to for stepping in at relatively short notice. Sorry that I can't be with you all, have a great day and I'll (hopefully) be back in a fortnight.
As for the walk itself, it's a relatively high level walk, although it's also fairly easy as it starts quite high and doesn't really include much climbing. That said, there is an additional short, but fairly steep, climb that you can add about three quarters of the way through, one that's well within your capabilities, and I fully expect to hear that you'd said to David "Yeah, let's do it!" ... we did it the last time we did this walk so it's no big deal.
Have a great day, the weather is promising to behave for once, sorry that I can't be with you, but just remember, I'll miss you far more than you'll miss me.
Pete.
Todays walk mirrors what we did in May 2013 so some of you will probably remember it, although hopefully, enough of you will be treading new ground to make it interesting. Beginning from junction 22 on the M62 means that we're already quite high up and makes this a high level walk that includes very little climbing.
Our first port of call is the Pennine Way footbridge that straddles the motorway before continuing due south as we pass a couple of telecommunication masts prior to crossing the A672 Oldham to Halifax road. Continuing southerly, we climb gently uphill over Axletree Edge before turning south east to conquer White Hill at 1,528ft / 466mtrs above sea level, our high spot for the day with views over the many reservoirs dotted about on these bleak moorlands.
Despite the bleakness of our surroundings we soon have a third road, the A640 Rochdale to Huddersfield, to cross. Once across the road two footpaths are available, one heading south east is a direct route to Marsden via Willykay Clough, shortening our walk by around three miles, with the second, and I imagine preferred option, being to remain on the Pennine Way as it heads south across Northern Rotcher and Millstone Edge, two areas of gritstone rock formations, to meet yet another road, the A62 at Standedge cutting.
Further options appear here, we can continue along the Pennine Way before taking to the Standedge Trail directly south of Redbrook Reservoir or alternatively, we could follow the A62 east before following the footpath that skirts the northern bank of Redbrook. Whichever option we choose, both deposit us on Mount Road where we'll turn left prior to heading right (due north) following the Standedge Trail around the lower part of Pule Hill. You may fancy going over the hill, and that is possible, although it involves a steep ascent, followed by a gentle descent towards Intake Head Farm from where we re-cross the A62 to reach Tunnel End which, as the name suggests, is the end of the Standedge Tunnel (where the Huddersfield Canal and the Manchester to Huddersfield rail line emerge from the three mile long Tunnel), and the visitor centre here detailing how the tunnels were made is always worth a look at.
All that's left is to cross the bridge and follow the canal the final half a mile to Marsden where you'll find plenty of hostelries ready and willing to serve you with refreshing drinks.
21/02/2016 - CONISTON

B Group WALK for the 21st February 2016

CONISTON via TORVER

Leader - Peter Rossall

Distance 9¼ miles / 15km

Ascent (total) 987ft / 301m

Time 5½ hours

Sunset Time 17:33

OL7 The English Lakes - South-eastern are

Start Grid Ref: : SD303974


Hi all,
It seems like we're due another poor day weather wise on Sunday - strong winds and low cloud with rain, or possibly snow, at times. Because of that, I've shelved the walk that I was hoping to do for something a little lower level. Hopefully it'll still give the 'B' group a decent day out. Here's what I'm doing.
Pete.
The promise of relatively poor weather today has prompted me to alter my proposed walk - which was to be The Old Man of Coniston - for something a little more subdued, and considerably lower level. That said, this area still gives us plenty of scope and I hope you like what I've decided upon.
We'll begin in Coniston itself (I'm assuming that we'll be using the John Ruskin School car park) and after visiting the loos, we'll head down to the lake before crossing a couple of fields via the permitted footpath to join the Hawkshead Road by the Waterhead Hotel. Turning right, we head past Monk Coniston before disappearing into Hill Fell Plantation, where we start climbing (gently) until we reach Tarn Hows.
Having covered roughly a third of our total distance, providing the weather is behaving, this area may prove to be a suitable 'elevenses' spot. Fortified with food and drink, we'll take the path along the eastern side of the Tarn as this gives the better photo opportunities. Up ahead at the far end of the Tarn is Black Fell (Black Crag), and that's our high point for today.
Upon reaching the northern end of the Tarn we'll take the bridleway east before turning north into Iron Keld Plantation on our way to the summit of Black Crag. Although it's only a relatively small fell, providing the cloud cover is not too low we should be able to see FIVE bodies of water from the summit (Windermere, Coniston Water, Esthwaite Water, Blelham Tarn and Tarn Hows).
We retrace our steps back through Iron Keld Plantation before following the path along the western side of Tarn Hows. Reaching the southern end of the tarn we'll take the path that heads steeply downhill by Tom Gill, passing a couple of very attractive waterfalls on the way. All that's left is to follow the Cumbria Way past Tarn Hows Cottage and Low Yewdale to finish back in Coniston where a number of pubs and cafes await our custom.
Hope the fact that we didn't get to 'do the Old Man' hasn't spoilt your day.

07/02/2016 - GRASMERE

B Group WALK for the 7th February 2016

GRASMERE

Leader - Peter Rossall

Distance 8¾ miles / 14km

Ascent (total) 2,352ft / 717m

Time 6½ hours

Sunset Time 17:05

OL7 The English Lakes - South-eastern area

Start Grid Ref: : NY339073


Hi all,
Not sure what we'll get weather-wise on Sunday - forecast is not great |(wind and rain showers) - and although the 'B' group will not be at tremendous heights by Lake District standards, we still may have some lying snow to cope with. Temperatures are supposed to be mild, al;though the wind chill may make it seem much cooler.
Les has arranged a suitable 10 mile long 'A' walk from Ambleside to Grasmere that crosses Fairfield and includes seven Wainwrights (see attachment for a copy) and I'm sure that David Wood will also have a walk planned, so here's what you've got to look forward to from myself.
See you Sunday, Pete.
Another old favourite today and a walk that we last did six years ago, almost to the day, when we had a very cold, but gloriously sunny, day with fantastic views. Sadly I can't see us having the same weather this weekend.
We start our walk in Grasmere itself, leaving the town via Easedale Road before beginning the 1000ft / 305m climb up to Helm Crag's summit. Wonderful and ever changing views break up the monotony of the ascent. The genuine summit of Helm Crag is an outcrop of rock known as the Howitzer, and it's climbable, though not easily, with getting down off it more difficult and it happens to be the only true summit not conquered by celebrated Lakeland legend Alfred Wainwright.
Having ascended the Howitzer, or not, as the case may be, we'll continue north westerly, keeping to the ridge path as it gently rises and falls, passing Gibson Knott, Moment Crag, Pike of Carrs and Calf Crag before arriving at the head of Far Easedale. Here we join the bridleway coming from Borrowdale and turn back on ourselves and begin our descent into the valley which we follow all the way back to Grasmere.
24/01/2016 - INGLEBOROUGH

B Group WALK for the 24th January 2016

Clapham to Ingleton via Ingleborough

Leader - Peter Rossall

Distance 7½ miles / 12 km

Ascent (total) 1991ft / 607m

Time 5½ hours

Sunset Time 16:38

OL2 Yorkshire Dales - Southern & Western areas

Start Grid Ref: : SD744693


Hi everyone,
It appears that we might be having a similar state of affairs to what we had last year, where those of you who walk on every weekend - you lucky folk - end up going to the same spot, and possibly doing identical or similar walks, two weeks on the trot. Apologies for those of you who fancy doing this 'B' walk, particularly if you did virtually the same walk last weekend. Sorry, but it happens to be a favourite of mine so I was fairly sure that I'd be doing this walk from September last year when we put together our itinery for 2016. That said, even if it's a repeat of what you did last week, it'll still be different - remember no two days are ever the same - and I can't promise you the amount of snow you had last Sunday. See you all on Sunday, Pete.
Right then, put quite simply today's walk sees us go up and over a mountain that sits quite comfortably in my personal top three of 'hills to climb'. What that means for some of you, those who were out with your other club last weekend, is that you'll be doing the same walk you did last Sunday. I sincerely hope that it whetted your appetite for another ascent so soon afterwards.
INGLEBOROUGH, a mountain that has six distinct ways to reach its summit, two of which we'll use to help us up and over its flat summit plateau. Starting from the car park in Clapham village (after the obligatory loo stop) we'll head through the village, using the quaint bridge to cross Clapham Beck before turning right and heading upstream. Reaching the outskirts of the village, two options become available to us, one taking us via a bridleway to Clapdale Farm with the second (preferred) option going via Clapdale Drive, thereby following the Beck through Clapdale Wood.
The preferred choice incurs a charge for the use of this 'private' path (or it should do but, the last time we did this walk - two years ago - we took this route without paying!!!!!, so don't forget, if we're sneaking in again and you get asked by someone who looks official "Which club are you?", tell them we're Fylde Coast Ramblers!... PS: I'm sure you're aware that I'm kidding). The route from here is relatively straightforward as it takes us past Ingleborough Cave, a spot that has special significance for myself as I fractured my skull here during a school trip to the cave in June 1967.
Still, enough of that as that as we head ever upward, turning left to reveal Trow Gill, a limestone ravine that's spectacular and requires an easy scramble and, once climbed, we're onto open fell side and heading for Gaping Gill (another limestone wonder) where the waters of Fell Beck fall 340ft 'down the plughole' before they reappear again by the entrance to Ingleborough Cave (obviously it goes without saying to take great care around the edge of Gaping Gill). Pressing on, we've got another 1000ft to ascend, first passing Little Ingleborough before topping out at 2375ft on its big brother.
In the right conditions the views from here are superb, however it can be a fairly unforgiving place in poor weather and can be blisteringly cold at times so, be prepared with a few extra layers just in case. All that's left is 3 miles to the finish, almost all of it downhill, steeply at first before levelling out around Crina Bottom, where we join the bridleway of Fell Lane that will take us into Ingleton to enjoy a well earned beverage and reunite with our transport.
10/01/2016 - GARSTANG

B Group WALK for the 10th January 2016

GARSTANG

Leader - Peter Rossall

Distance 6 miles / 9.75Km

Ascent (total) 170ft / 52m

Time 3 hours

Sunset Time 16:16

Map OL41 Forest of Bowland and Ribblesdale

Start Grid Ref: : SD493454


Happy New Year to you all,
sorry for the lateness of my planned 'B' walk (those on facebook may already be aware of some t'internet problems that I've had recently).
I travelled to Garstang on Wednesday to see what the conditions were like on the walk that I planned to do. They weren't bad, although there's lots of mud ... you're not surprised by that are you?
The walk itself is easy, so apologies for that if you were looking for a strenuous start to the year to rid yourself of any over indulgence during the festive period. Alternatively, John's 'A' walk is a 10 miler and David Wood is planning to have a walk out to Hazlehurst Fell and back, a distance of 11 miles.
Whichever group you decide to join, we'll all finish and the Golf & Country Club for our belated Xmas meal.
See you all on Sunday. Pete.
Happy New Year to everybody, I hope you've all had an enjoyable festive break. After campaigning for years for us to use Garstang as a base for a winter therefore short daylight hours walk, I've finally got my wish. On the downside is the fact that there's not much height to be gained around here, well not without walking a good few miles to reach the Bowland fells, although on the plus side, it means that we have an easy day to enjoy, and with our delayed Xmas meal at the end, that might not be a bad thing.
We'll begin our walk in Garstang by what used to be the Discovery Centre from where we'll follow the river Wyre east and north. A case of Wyre Ramblers rambling by the Wyre ... the first opportunity to cross the river happens via the disused railway but we'll forego this and continue until we reach the ford (which we'll not use) and the footbridge (which we will use) to cross to the east of the river.
The residue left by the river from last months floods is still fairly evident and makes you realise that we are pretty impotent in comparison with mother nature. The rain and floods have left the underfoot conditions quite slippy so tread warily as we start to head gently uphill away from the river. A crossing of the West Coast main line and M6 Motorway lead us past Long Crossey Wood to Higher Lane.
We turn south here, following the lane as it turns into Keeper's Lane to arrive at Slack Farm, where we leave the tarmac to pass by Lady Hamilton's Well (blink and you'll miss it!). Here's where it gets really muddy!, although lunch is just around the corner.
I plan to have lunch in the church yard of All Saints Church, Barnacre, where there are four sets of seats available, although they're a little bit like compass points, being in different locations of the church grounds. Fed and watered we continue southwards before a tiny bit of road walking brings us to our next set of muddy fields. Upon reaching Lower House Farm we'll turn west and head downhill to re-cross the M6 and the rail line and also the Lancaster Canal. All that's left is a small bit of road walking to end up at the Garstang Golf & Country Club where we can change for dinner before enjoying our belated Xmas meal.
NB: If we've been in road runner mode (beep beep!) and covered the ground too quickly, we can amend our walk prior to re-crossing the M6 and Railway to visit the Kenlis Arms for an aperitif or two. This wouldn't add any mileage, but it would waste a bit of time.

2015

29/11/2015 - STAVELEY

B Group WALK for the 29th November 2015

STAVELEY

Leader - Peter Rossall

Distance 9¼ miles / 15Km

Ascent (total) 670ft / 204m

Time 5 hours

Sunset Time 15:59

Map OL7 English Lakes - South Eastern Area

Start Grid Ref: SD472981


Hi all,
Seems like we're due another glorious Sunday weather wise this weekend with 30, 40, 50 or even 60mph gusts and some heavy showers........sounds idyllic. Here's what I'm planning to do for the 'B' group which, if we do it as described will mean walking into the wind and rain for the most part. I've put a note at the foot of the page detailing a possible alternative walk that was loosely discussed a fortnight ago that we may be able to 'cadge a lift on' if nobody fancies the following option. See you for another soggy Sunday. Pete
Quite a long walk today (for the time of year), although it's actually a very easy walk overall, or at least it should be, however the weather may have something of an influence on whether it feels that way once we've completed it.
We begin the walk from the A591 by the Staveley turn off. We make our way into the village, crossing the River Kent via the footbridge before following the river northwards to Barley Bridge. A short stretch of uphill road walking brings us to a bridleway that we follow to Scroggs Farm, soon leading to Scroggs Bridge and onto Browfoot Lane.
A sharp left hand turn leads to a footpath crossing the shoulder of Hugill Fell before we reach a green lane where we turn right to follow this round to High Borrans and eventually Borrans Reservoir (not the first time I've brought people here) and it's normally been a luncheon stop.
We follow the road downhill from the reservoir to meet Moorhowe Road, turning left, then right, to follow the minor road to Near Orrest (again a spot that we've visited on numerous occasions previously), before we ascend to Orrest Heads summit. There's usually super views from here ... but today may not offer them.
We're on the last leg now as we make our way around Windermere to finish in Bowness.

Alternatively, if the weather is very poor (as it's forecasted to be), we could all ask Les if we can join him as he leads a walk going in the opposite direction (starting in Bowness and finishing in Staveley) with the promise of a finish in the Hawkshead Brewery at Staveley.
15/11/2015 - MALHAM

B Group WALK for the 15th November 2015

AROUND MALHAM

Leader - Peter Rossall

Distance 7.2 miles / 11.5km

Ascent (total) 1115ft / 340m

Time 5 hours

Sunset Time 16:15

Map OL2 Yorkshire Dales - Southern and western areas

Start Grid Ref: : SD900627


Hello everyone,
Those who follow Wyre Ramblers on facebook should already be aware that I was planning to include a walk around Malham without climbing the waterfall at Gordale Scar ...
This caused much consternation and I was asked to reconsider my decision - which I did - but, having promised (on facebook) that I'd climb the waterfall, the (very wet) weather over the last seven days or so has meant that I've had to go back on that promise and return to my original planned walk.
I'm aware that ascending the waterfall at Gordale is a delight to all fell walkers - non more so then myself - but I just feel that the conditions will not be suitable this weekend. That said, I still intend to visit Gordale Scar during our walk as it always warrants a visit, irrespective of whether you climb the waterfall, or whether you've been there before or not.
The overall walk is relatively easy, and really quite short although, if the forecasted weather is as bad as predicted, you might thank me for reducing the hours we need to be out in the wind and rain.
Don't be put off, hope to see loads of you on Sunday.
Pete.
Our walk today includes an early ascent of about 1000ft, although the walk itself will be relatively easy, and fairly short, as we take in the various delights that Malham has on its doorstep. Whether the weather will behave is something upon which I have no control ... I just hope that you all said your prayers last night!
We commence our walk from the car park in Malham after having first visited 'the facilities' following the walled track west of the car park before heading north, and then north west, ascending gradually, albeit continuously, passing by Pikedaw Hill before reaching a gated wall, which we pass through and turn immediately right to follow the wall to Nappa Cross, an old monastic wayside cross from where we should be able to view Malham Tarn (although the weather may have a say in that).
Having done the majority of our climbing for the day we descend gently north easterly prior to turning east at the junction with our next path. We follow this, crossing a road in the process before reaching Watlowes - the Dry Valley (which might not be very dry on this day!) - with this eventually leading us to Malham Cove.
Upon reaching the Cove be careful as limestone paving can be very slippy when wet. We'll have a look around, and possibly even over the edge (though don't get to close as it a long way down), before heading south east across Sheriff Hill as we make our way towards the road by Gordale Bridge from where we'll proceed through the camp site to have a look at the natural wonder that is Gordale Scar, an impressive sight, whether it's your first or your umpteenth viewing of it.
Having gawped at and realised that climbing the waterfall must be terrific - it is, just not today - we'll retrace our steps back to the road before nipping off to view the waterfall of Janet's Foss where Gordale Beck flows pleasingly over the rocks. All that's left is a gentle stroll back to Malham where we can enjoy some refreshment, and dry out, before setting off for home.
Sorry we've been denied the chance to climb the waterfall today but, it'll outlive us so there'll always be another opportunity.
01/11/2015 - BROUGHTON MILLS

B Group WALK for the 1st November 2015

BROUGHTON MILLS via TORVER

Leader - Someone who won't get you lost.unlike I normally do!

Distance 9½ miles / 15 km

Ascent (total) 705ft / 215m

Time 5½ hours

Sunset Time 16:40

Map OL6 The English Lakes - South Western area

Start Grid Ref: : SD282940


Sadly for me I can't be with you today so, just in case my short notice request for any other person to lead you - of which there are plenty of suitable candidates - has gone unheeded, here's what I was planning to do. If no 'leader' has stepped forward, please feel free to follow the route as described below and you'll find that it's not as difficult as it may appear and also that it's fantastically rewarding when you do get from point A to point B, and that it can still be fun even when you get it slightly wrong (I speak from experience regarding that!). Have fun.
Leaving the coach just after joining the A593 at Torver, you'll cross a field before joining a track close to Moor Farm that takes you to Mill Bridge. Rather than crossing Torver Beck, you turn right here to follow the bridleway that passes Torver Tarn (described as the disused reservoir on the map) and, having passed the tarn, you join the Cumbria Way which will be your companion for the next three miles or so.
Your next point of reference is Beacon Tarn and this would probably make a suitable spot for an 'elevenses' stop. Continuing southwards, you'll decend a little before climbing gently up and over the shoulder of Tottlebank Height to arrive by a bridleway that we've used before. Turn right here (leaving the Cumbria Way) and head gently downhill to join the minor road by the Giant's Grave (the Giant's Grave is a fairly nondescript stone hiding in the bracken just behind you to your right and I'm not quite sure why it warrants a mention on OS maps).
Having viewed 'the rock', your next move is to turn right and follow the road steeply downhill, looking for a track off to the left which brings you to a road which you cross to enter into Longfield Wood. Continuing you'll pass by Woodland Hall where you'll turn south west to cross over Thornthwaite Latter Rigg (as the path rises, taking the left hand track avoids a 200ft ascent and takes you past Fell End camping barn before the two routes rejoin one another).
Almost home, with just the crossing of a (usually muddy) field leading to the spot where Claire and Jeanne had '*their moment' when we were last here almost two years to the day. Following the path you'll reach a road where you need to turn left. A couple of hundred yards on, take the right hand fork as the road splits and follow the path past Wall End and into Broughton in Furness to enjoy whatever refreshment is your preferred choice. Well done.

* For those not with us two years ago, a six foot section of flooded path led to Claire and Jeanne requiring much needed cajoling before they'd 'pluck up the courage' to cross this ankle deep stretch of water (video evidence does exist!). Help was also offered and given by Michael Holden and John Hilton whilst the rest of us ungallant fella's looked on laughing, possibly hoping that all four would 'fall in' ... they didn't.
18/10/2016 - AMBLESIDE

B Group WALK for the 18th October 2015

AMBLESIDE

Leader - Peter Rossall

Distance 8¾ miles / 14 km

Ascent (total) 2,381ft / 726m

Time 5½ hours

Sunset Time 18:10

Map OL7 The English Lakes - south eastern area

Start Grid Ref: : NY374042


Hello everybody,
As promised a couple of days ago (well, to those who can view the Wyre Ramblers facebook page anyway), here's what I've got planned for the 'B' group this weekend.
I'm sure that the decent weather that is promised for this weekend may be leading John to seriously consider doing the Fairfield Horseshoe (i'm not trying to put ideas in his head, honest!....its just that we don't get the daylight hours when we come to Ambleside to undertajke a walk like that) and, whether he is or isn't, there is a possibility that Les may lead an alternative 'A minus', or should that be a 'B plus'? version of that walk.
Whatever, I'm sure we'll all have another great days fellwalking.
See you on Sunday.
Pete

The last time we used Ambleside as a base in anything other than the 'depths of winter' (which brings with it short daylight hours) was late February in 2011..so, because we're here before the clocks go back this year and as some of my loyal walkers have recently discovered a new found love and enthusiasm for walking in the high fells, I've decided to subject you all to a relatively high level (in parts) horseshoe walk, although it's not the highest or most difficult horseshoe that this area has to offer. It's an area I've never trodden before, so hopefully you all get as much enjoyment from it as I undoubtedly will.
Setting off from the 'free' Rothay Holme HGV park, we'll pass through Ambleside (giving you chance to view your preferred Café's or pubs for our return) before making our way into the Scandale valley via Sweden Bridge Lane. The tarmac eventually turns into a track taking us through Rough Sides wood towards High Sweden bridge, which we don't cross!.
Continuing gently uphill we eventually reach Scandale Bottom (apparently it can be a bit boggy here) from where the gradient becomes steadily steeper with us ultimately reaching the ladder stile that marks the crossroads of Scandale Pass.
From here Red Screes looms above us to our right although I propose to visit Middle Dodd (for the views it affords) and this involves a little bit of 'off-piste' to get there. Having admired the view of Brothers Water, the lower part of the Kirkstone Pass and the Patterdale valley, we'll make our way to Red Screes summit and our high point of the day (2,546ft) where we can look over towards Fairfield to the north west and look down upon the Kirkstone Inn to the south east.
Leaving the summit and its adjacent tarn we head gently downhill, passing by Raven Crag and Snarker Pike as we do, with what should be extensive, and constant, views of Windermere. A short stretch of tarmac along the Kirkstone Road returns us to Ambleside where we can choose our preferred method of 'refuelling' whilst telling everyone what a fabulous day we've had.
06/09/2015 - GRASSINGTON

B Group WALK for the 6th September 2015

GRASSINGTON

Leader - Peter Rossall

Distance 8¾ miles / 14 km

Ascent (total) 817ft / 249m

Time 5¾ hours

Sunset Time 19:51

Map OL2 Yorkshire Dales - Southern & western areas

Start Grid Ref: : SE002638


Hi everyone,
Sorry it's a bit late but I'd been umming and aahing with whether to do a circular or a linear walk from Bolton Abbey. I thought that John may have been taking on that option, so here's what us 'B' groupers will be doing.
Don't forget, Monday sees us having our AGM - at the Cricket Club at Fleetwood - where you can put forward suggestions for any changes that you feel may be necessary, or at least suitable for discussion, to club policy.
See you on what promises to be a dry Sunday, weather wise that is!......
Pete

Our first visit to Yorkshire since that snowy day in February when we visited Horton-in-Ribblesdale and our first visit to this particular corner of Yaaarksher for five years. Where does the time go?. Because it's been so long since we were last here, I've decided to repeat the walk we did last time although I'm sure you'll all be more than pleased with it. There's a bit of climbing involved - but that's what fell walking clubs do, isn't it? - but nothing of the nature of Causey Pike (hope you've all recovered from that and actually really appreciated it and felt pleased with yourselves!).
Having used the facilities in the car park at Grassington we'll make our way down to the river Wharfe before following the riverside path past Ghaistrill's Strid, a waterfall of sorts, albeit that it may look less than spectacular after the recent dry spell we've had. Our path leaves the river and sadly dumps us on a minor road for a short while before we head across a field prior to having to use the road again for a longer stretch.
We eventually end up in Conistone from where we'll head east as we make for the limestone gorge of Conistone Dib. It's not quite of Gordale Scar proportions although it's still mightily impressive. Reaching the top of the 'Dib' requires a small scramble although it's not as arduous as the scramble onto Causey Pike was. We still have a bit of climbing to do although its on a bridleway (the Bycliffe Road) that resembles a motorway, so its relatively easy.
Leaving the bridleway at its highest point, we turn south and start the journey back to Grassington. We're on open high Pennine moorland, a place that can pretty unforgiving in the wrong conditions although I don't expect us to suffer any undue hardship this weekend. We'll pass by Bare House, a derelict building, before starting our descent back to our destination.
Typical Yorkshire Dales scenery, with many stone walls and Limestone escarpments, should make for a pleasing end to our walk, complete with a selection of fine café's and pubs to choose from once we reach Grassington.
23/08/2015 - BRAITHWAITE

B Group WALK for the 23rd August 2015

BRAITHWAITE

Leader - Peter Rossall

Distance 7¼ miles / 11.7 km

Ascent (total) 2167ft / 662m

Time 6 hours

Sunset Time 20:24

Map : OL4 The English Lakes North western area

Start Grid Ref: : NY241237


Hi everyone,
Another glorious Sunday weather wise was enjoyed last weekend ... so who in our club is going to own up to having broken a mirror!. I only ask beceause we seem to be having more than our fair share of 'bad luck' on the weather front this year. That said, the weather for this weekend is looking OK, albeit that its not superb. Still, we're made of stern stuff....aren't we?.
Anyway, as promised to those who were with the 'B' group a fortnight ago, here's the 'easy' route that I've got planned for this Sunday. Some of our members (who walk with another club) could well be making an ascent of Causey Pike for the second Sunday running, although they did it in a different direction.
See you all on Sunday, Pete

For the first time this year we find ourselves very close to where we were a fortnight ago. Those who were with me last time out will be aware that I'd offered the opportunity for us to climb either Cat Bells or Causey Pike this weekend, pointing each one out from just south of Portinscale, and Causey Pike won the "vox pop" poll handsomely. All that remained was for me to determine whether we take the steep route over Rowling End, or the less severe route around the side. It's all as broad as long really as you still have to climb to the same height so maybe we'll see how we feeL as we reach the foot of the climb and make a collective decision then.
We start gently from the minor road just off the A66 on the outskirts of Braithwaite village before passing under the A66 and following Newlands Beck to reach the minor road that runs between Swinside and Stair. Here's where our strenuous ascent starts as over the next three-quarters of a mile we climb around 1000ft along the path to Rowling End, or maybe not as the case may be, before arriving at Sleet Hause where the gradient eases for a while before another 650ft ascent, with the final 20ft or so being an easy scramble, sees us reach the summit of Causey Pike.
That's it, all the hard (really strenuous) work is done for the day and we'll continue along the ridge, actually reaching our highest point of the day (Scar Crags) before arriving at the Sail Pass crossroads where we turn and head north east, traversing over High Moss and skirting underneath Outerside, with Causey Pike towering 700ft above us to the right.
Rather than descending the path alongside Stonycroft Gill, we're making our way to Barrow Door which leads us to our final ascent of the day, a mere 215ft up onto Barrow, a small hill but one that affords glorious views. Immediately north of us is Braithwaite, with Skiddaw looming large behind it, and our (downhill) grassy ridge route to our final destination is obvious ahead. We'll have time to enjoy some suitable refreshment before making the quarter mile journey back to the A66 junction where the coach will be.
09/08/2015 - BORROWDALE

B Group WALK for the 9th August 2015

BORROWDALE

Leader - Peter Rossall

Distance 10 miles / 1 km

Ascent (total) 872ft / 266m

Time 5½ hours

Sunset Time 20:54

Map : OL4 The English Lakes North west area

Start Grid Ref: : NY254168


Hi everyone,
Hope you're all enjoying the glorious weather that we've had for the last couple of days, because it's due to disappear overnight, just in time for our trip to Lakeland ...
That said, whilst tomorrow wont be as nice as the last couple of days, it's not supposed to be really bad, just a lack of sunshine, and possibly some light rain (which is different to Snowdonia rain!), although it's expected to still be relatively warm.
Here's the easy walk that the 'B' group will be undertaking.
See you tomorrow. Pete.

Borrowdale sees us heading for the tiny hamlet of Seatoller, a beautiful area surrounded by giant fells, but an area that has no real facilities for relaxing at the end of our day so, because of that, I've decided to walk through Borrowdale, taking in a couple of its delights before finishing in Keswick where cafés and pubs abound. It's quite a long walk with a little too much tarmac to tread although overall it's very easy and we've only got one serious climb to undertake.
Leaving the coach on the B5289 by the Quayfoot Quarry car park from where we'll make the short trip to the Bowder Stone. We've been here on many occasions previously although thankfully there's usually someone in the group who hasn't and the stone is quite a sight. Continuing south through Borrowdale we reacquaint ourselves with the road which we'll follow for a mile before turning right to pass through Rosthwaite where we'll cross the river Derwent, either via the stepping stones or the bridge.
Once across the river we begin our ascent of Castle Crag, a tiny hill that I've never climbed although I believe that the 680ft ascent is very steep. Supposedly the views from the summit are well worth all the effort expended. We'll see!.
Carefully descending from Castle Crag we turn north onto the bridleway that follows Broadslack Gill before reaching the Cumbria Way just south of Grange, and we follow this path as it takes us along the western edge of Derwent Water, through Portinscale and into Keswick where we can amuse ourselves whilst we await our transport picking us up.

Dependent on what the A group are doing and where they plan to finish their walk, there's a possibility that the coach may already be in Keswick when we arrive there.
26/07/2015 - BETWS-Y-COED

B Group WALK for the 26th July 2015

BETWS-Y-COED 26/07/2015

Leader - Peter Rossall

Distance 10.25 miles / 16.5 km

Ascent (total) 416ft / 127m

Time 5 hours

Sunset Time 21:19

Map : OL17 Snowdon / Yr Wyddfa

Start Grid Ref: : SH649604


Hi all,
Sorry for the lateness of my walk details. As John had indicated, just as he had, I'd also been watching the weather with interest and, as is typical of our clubs trips to Ogwen, it's due to rain all day long!.......well, maybe more heavy showers than raining all day long so don't be put off as we'll all be in the same boat - hmmm, if it rains all day long we may need a boat! - and we'll still have a giggle.
Anyway, here's what the 'B' group will be doing. It's a downhill walk - Honestly?, "Yeah!" - believe that if you will.....and, whilst there will be some uphill bits, they'll be few and far between.
John has also indicated that if the weather means that he can't justify doing his Tryfan walk (personally I can't see the weather being good enough for him to even consider it, but you never know) that he will lead his 'A' group from close to Llyn Ogwen to Betws-y-coed, although his walk will involve considerably more ascent.
See you tomorrow. Pete.

Following the glorious day that we enjoyed in Shropshire a fortnight ago, it appears that we're going to get the weather that we normally suffer when we visit Ogwen, in other words, rain!. So, because of the poor forecast, but also as a way of saying Thank you to those of you who I led on a more strenuous than usual walk that the B group did last time out which, in spite of its steepish ascents and descents, I'm sure that you all loved!... it was certainly wonderfully picturesque. By comparison, this walk should be a doddle.
Our walk starts from Idwal Cottage on the A5 trunk road by the western end of Llyn Ogwen (Lake Ogwen). We have a short stretch of road walking to reach Pont pen y benglog before using the path that skirts the northern edge of the lake. When we reach the eastern end of the lake we re-cross the A5 road to take the bridleway that follows the Afon Llugwy river before depositing us in Capel Curig.

After a flattish start to our days walking we now have a little bit of climbing to do, although there's nothing too strenuous as we wander through an extensive forested area before heading downhill to rejoin both the A5 road and the river at Ty-Hyll (known locally as the Ugly House, though it's possibly more quaint than ugly, I'll let you decide).

From here we stay fairly close to the river, passing by Swallow Falls and the Miners bridge before a little bit of minor road walking sees us end our day in Betws-y-coed, a picture postcard village with lots of attractions to keep us happy whilst we await our transport arriving to pick us up (if the weather is as poor as forecast, John may also be looking to lead his A group to a finish in Betws-y-coed, in which case, our transport will already be there).
12/07/2015 - CHURCH STRETTON

B Group WALK for the 12th July 2015

CHURCH STRETTON

Leader - Peter Rossall

Distance 7.5 miles / 12 km

Ascent (total) 1817ft / 554m

Time 4,5 hours

Sunset Time 21:37

Map : 241 Shrewsbury & 217 The Long Mynd & Wenlock Edge

Start Grid Ref: : SJ484006


Hi everyone,

G'day everybody (sorry about the Aussie type greeting, but I'm in 'Ashes' mode)......

As a club we tend to (understandably) continue returning to 'old favourites' time and time again, however this weekend, we've got our second new destination for the club this year. It's an area that I know (though not too well) due to having a sister and her hubby living nearby and its lovely and our finishing town of Church Stretton is very pretty. I'm hopeful that we'll enjoy this destination every bit as much as those of us who visited Mold a few weeks ago enjoyed that trip.

The weather is looking OK. A little breezy, but with pleasantly warm temperatures (not too hot, so great walking weather!) and essentially dry with good visibility although, there's the threat of the odd light shower.
Up to press (Thursday morning), we've only 32 'booked on', so we've plenty of room for any latecomers.
Don't forget, it's a single pick-up at Four Lane Ends, Thornton, at 8am. Our journey should take us about two and a half hours, so no longer than it takes us to reach Buttermere.

Les will be leading an 'A' walk onto the Long Mynd (pronounced minned, as in tinned) and here's what I have planned for the 'B' walk.

See you on Sunday. Pete. Pete.

The club have never been here before but for those who bother to turn up, I'm sure that you'll love it. Our walk takes us up and over two whaleback fells so includes two large(ish) ascents and descents, although all told its a relatively easy walk, short in length (to allow for the travelling time) and with magnificent views.
Starting from the lay by bus stop on the A49 a mile and a half south of Dorrington, we'll follow the road through the sleepy village of Longnor to arrive at Bentley Fold Farm. A couple of fields leads us back to the road which we follow for a short while before starting our first ascent onto the Lawley.

By B group standards, this is quite a pull up. Its only about 700ft but has lots of those annoying false summits, but, because we're not in a race, take your time and enjoy the 360 degree views. North across the flat and very fertile Shropshire plain, complete with its fields of crops. Eastwards to Wenlock Edge and Brown Clee Hill (Shropshires highest point), south to the Shropshire Hills with Caer Caradoc, our next target, immediately in front of us and westwards to Wales with (on a good day) views across to Snowdonia.

I propose to have lunch somewhere around the summit with us taking shelter from any breeze (if required, this is July after all) by dropping a few feet from the ridge path. Suitably refreshed, and having gorged on the glorious views, we'll reacquaint ourselves with the ridge path and drop quickly downhill to Comley Farm before a small stretch of road walking brings us to the path that we'll follow along the ridge to Caer Caradoc's summit.

Again, wonderful views abound, the Long Mynd looks great from here and we can see the town of Church Stretton below us. All down hill from here, and very very steeply so take care. Church Stretton itself has quite a rich history and is a lovely town with lots of shops, cafés and pubs, so a pleasant end to what I hope has been a great day for you all. Here's to another club visit to this lovely area.
28/06/2015 - LANGHOLME

B Group WALK for the 28th June 2015

LANGHOLME

Leader - Peter Rossall

Distance 9 miles / 14.5 km

Ascent (total) 1099ft / 335m

Time 6 hours

Sunset Time 21:45

Map : OL323 Eskdale & Castle Oer Forest

Start Grid Ref: : NY363849


Hi everyone,

Apologies for the lateness of my walk details for this weekend, but I've had a busy week. I'd like to use the excuse that I've been 'watching the weather' with interest, though that would be untrue. I've actually had to do some fairly lenghty shifts at work due to staff holidays and illnesses with my only day off - Thursday - coinciding with a pre-booked 'stag do' for a fellow Wyre Rambler (David Jackson).

We enjoyed a good day in Wigan, go-karting and ten-pin bowling, oh and partaking of a few beers (though very sensibly, not too many) and I'm sure that whatever the weather decides to do tomorrow, that we'll also have a great day.

It's a lovely area, totally different to Buttermere, but so much easier to get to.

Here's what the 'B' group will be doing, hope to see plenty of you tomorrow and that the promised rain clears off sooner rather than later.

Pete.

Just as John has done and, due to the amount of new members that we've accumulated in the last three years, I've also decided to repeat the walk that we did when we came to this area in 2012. There's a little too much tarmac to be traipsed, although that makes it a physically undemanding walk and thankfully the charms of the wonderful surroundings more than compensate for all the road walking. After the club's last visit here I was so impressed with the scenery, and the remoteness of the road from Newcastleton to Langholm, that I decided I'd return and ride my bicycle along it one day and I had an enjoyable day doing that last September. I'm sure that just like me, you'll all be impressed by the area, whether you're a first time visitor or not.
We start from the car park just off the A7, heading south through the town centre along the main street before taking Hallpath, leading us through the residential outskirts of the town and passing the Round House on our way to Broomholmshiels Farm where we meet a minor road.

Turning east we follow the road as it heads into the valley of Tarras Water. We remain in the valley as we pass Cronksbank and Peterburn, crossing the river on a couple of occasions before arriving at Middlemoss. Eventually we reach the minor road (the one I cycled along) where we'll begin our return to Langholm.

Generally,turning for home would usually mean heading downhill, however, for us today it takes us to our highest point, passing two memorials to local luminaries. We reach the first memorial - the MacDiarmid Memorial, a cast iron sculpture depicting an open paged book in memory of Christopher Grieve, whose pen name was MacDiarmid, a Langholm born writer and one of Scotlands most celebrated poets and political commentators - by the side of the road, with our second memorial directly above us on Whita Hill, this being the Malcolm Memorial obelisk. It celebrates another locally born person, Major General Sir John Malcolm, a Scottish solider, Statesman and Historian and a former Governor of Bombay who died in 1833.
14/06/2015 - BUTTERMERE

B Group WALK for the 14th June 2015

BUTTERMERE (Wainwrights Ashes)

Leader - Peter Rossall

Distance 8 miles / 12.9 km

Ascent (total) 1673ft / 519m

Time 6½ hours

Sunset Time 21:42

Map : OL4 The English Lakes North western area

Start Grid Ref: : NY173169


Hello all,
I've been watching the weather with interest this week. A couple of days ago it was claiming that on Sunday we'd get rain in the part of the lakes where we due to be. Today that's changed and we can expect a dry day, albeit that we'll have some high clouds. As is the norm with these things, trying to predict too far in advance is always full of opportunities for someone (the weather people) to get it wrong. We'll take, and deal with, whatever comes our way. In the meantime, based on the current weather forecast, I'm still proposing to take the 'B' group over Haystacks (see description below). I've heard a rumour that there may be a 'splinter group' of 'B' walkers who fancy doing both Fleetwith Pike and Haystacks, so if you're one of those, keep your ears peeled on Sunday. Don't forget, because it's a long coach trip to Buttermere, we're on a single pick-up/drop-off at Four Lane Ends, Thornton from 8am.
See you all on Sunday.
Pete.

Having climbed Fleetwith Pike on our visit to Buttermere last year I've decided that today I'll treat you to its next door neighbour Haystacks which just happened to be the favourite mountain of the celebrated fell-walker Alfred Wainwright, and is the place where he asked for his ashes to be scattered. We've done this walk previously as a B walk, although I was amazed to find that it was six years ago.
We commence our walk from Buttermere village, heading south west to pick up the lakeshore path, giving us a nice gentle start to the day. Just before reaching the southern end of the lake, we take the path that leads steadily uphill before joining the main Scarth Gap path. At the top of the pass, we turn left for the final ascent to the summit of Haystacks, travelling over some rocky terrain with a little bit of easy scrambling involved. Having climbed just under 1600ft, all the hard work for the day is now done, so just enjoy the views, which are spectacular.
Leaving the summit, we'll head south east towards Innominate Tarn and this is where Wainwright had his ashes poured-out having left the following instructions, "All I ask for at the end, is a last long resting place by the side of Innominate Tarn, on Haystacks, where the water gently laps the gravelly shore and the heather blooms and Pillar and Gable keep unfailing watch. A quiet place, a lonely place. I shall go to it for the last time, carried by someone who knew me in life who'll take me and empty me out of a little box and leave me there alone. And if you, dear reader, should get a bit of grit in your boot as you are crossing Haystacks in the years to come, please treat it with respect because it might be me."
Continuing south easterly we pass Blackbeck Tarn, crossing its outflow, before turning north east towards Fleetwith Pike, although we're not headed there today. We'll use the path that loosely follows the western side of Warnscale Beck before crossing it via a footbridge as make our way down to the valley floor at Warnscale Bottom. Prior to reaching the road at Gatesgarth, a quick look up Fleetwith Edge will not only bring back (hopefully) good memories of last years ascent, but also the white cross that was erected by the friends of Fanny Mercer, a visitor to Lakeland in 1887, who tripped over her Alpenstock - an early version of the modern day walking pole - and fell to her death!.
A short walk along the road brings us to the path that skirts the opposite side of the lake from that taken earlier. We follow this, through the Hassness tunnel, tall lads and lasses take care not to bump your head here before leaving the lake at its northern end to continue through fields back to Buttermere village.
31/05/2015 - MOLD

B Group WALK for the 31st May 2015

MOLD (North East Wales)

Leader - Peter Rossall

Distance 9¾ miles / 16 km

Ascent (total) 1781ft / 543m

Time 6 hours

Sunset Time 21:29

Map OL265 The Clwydian Ridge

Start Grid Ref: : SJ195627


Good afternoon everyone,
I'm fairly early with the details of my walk for this weekend for a change. It's a bit early to offer a reliable weather forecast for Sunday but from the info that's available currently, it appears that we may have a breezy day with occasional showers. Not fantastic for the last day of May, although over the next few days the forecast may improve, or conversely it may get worse!......let's hope it's the former. See you on Sunday, Pete

A brand new area for me, and hopefully most of you, to explore today, a situation that is always a pleasure, albeit that it sometimes brings forth the odd problem with navigation. I've studied my map and arranged what I think will be a suitable ridge walk. It includes a couple of lengthy ascents, one of 950ft, one of 650ft, although your efforts are rewarded fully as the views are renowned to be excellent and, the remainder of the walk is relatively easy, or it appears so from the map!. I believe that another local club (Fylde Ramblers) who a few of you walk with came here earlier in the year and had some fun and games with navigation, although on that occasion the weather was playing silly beggars and that never helps when you're in unknown territory.
Beginning from the Loggerheads Country Park car park (where toilet facilities exist), we'll make our way back out of the main entrance before following the A494 for a short while prior to using a bridleway, a minor road and various field paths to rejoin the A road by the Druid Inn pub at Llanferres.
Here's where our first ascent starts proper as we head towards Bwlch Crug-Glas. We'll utilise the Offas Dyke path (Wales forerunner of the Pennine Way) to convey us up and onto Foel Fenlli. A steep descent of around 500ft brings us to the minor road at Bwlch Penbarra before we begin climbing again onto Moel Famau and its ruined Jubilee Tower.
Offas Dyke path heads west here but we keep heading north north east until we've passed the wooded area where we'll turn due east along the bridleway that sees us around the northern slopes of Ffrith Mountain before depositing us on a minor road that we'll follow for a third of a mile to Bryn Alyn.
Off the road and into the Alyn valley, we head steeply downhill to cross the Afon Alyn (river Alun in English) by a footbridge before following the river upstream to arrive back at Loggergheads where a licenced café (Caffi Florence) awaits our custom. Alternatively, a pub (the We Three Loggerheads) is located on the A494 opposite the main entrance to the country park.
17/05/2015 - KESWICK

B Group WALK for the 17th May 2015

KESWICK

Leader - Peter Rossall

Distance 9½ miles / 15 km

Ascent (total) 1220ft / 370m

Time 6½ hours

Sunset Time 21:09

Map OL4 The English Lakes - North Western area

Start Grid Ref: : NY265236


Hiya folks,
Sorry it's late but, like John I've been watching the weather forecasts (and hoping they'd get better). Whilst Keswick offers plenty of options for walks, if the weather is foul those opptions are reduced greatly. The forecast I've seen said 'light rain showers' so based on that I've decided to do a relatively low level walk (by Lake District standards) with the hope that weather is better than anticipated.
Two years ago I missed a trip to Keswick because of a silly weekend away in Sunderland (blame Dave Clegg for that), and in my absence John Westmore (who sadly is no longer walking with us) took you on a pleasant walk in my absence. I was indebted to John that day and because of that I feel that it's only right that I should pay due homage to him by repeating his walk this weekend.
Starting from the car park in Keswick we head out of town via a crossing of the river Greta and Fitz Park which leads us to Spooney Green Lane and the path that leads all the way (eventually) to Skiddaw 3000ft above us. We're not going there today though maybe one day! as instead we'll leave the path to join the gentle zig-zags that take us to Latrigg, a tiny little bump in comparison to Skiddaw, but one that affords stunning views none the less.
Once over the top we head eastwards to Brundholme where we cross the Greta again before going under the A66 trunk road as we make our way towards Tewet Tarn, one of the less well known Lakeland tarns. Another short uphill section takes us over Low Rigg, eventually depositing us by the lovely St. Johns in the Vale Church. From here we head west to meet up with the A591 main road from Ambleside although thankfully, we only have a few hundred yards of this before we're off crossing fields again, passing High Nest farm on our way to the stone circle at Castlerigg.
I know that many of you have been here many times previously but, for anyone who's a first time visitor, it's always an interesting place to explore. As we are on the outskirts of Keswick, all that remains is a gentle downhill walk (along pavements) towards the town with a little respite from the tarmac/pavement provided by the disused railway track which finishes close to Fitz Park and leaves us with a stroll back through the town to our transport, providing the outdoor shops, cafés and pubs don't grab our attention first.
19/04/2015 - LINGMOOR FELL

B Group WALK for the 19th April 2015

LINGMOOR FELL

Leader - Peter Rossall

Distance 8 miles / 13 km

Ascent (total) 1581ft / 482m

Time 5½ hours

Sunset Time 20:20

Maps OL7 & OL6 English Lakes, south east/south west areas

Start Grid Ref: : NY344035


Hi all,
I'm 'on the ball' this week - helped by a favourable weather forecast - with an early description of what I plan to do as a 'B' walk.
As there's so many things to do in and around Langdale, we tend to be spoilt for choice. I'm sure that John will have some 'monster' walk planned, whether that be because of the height or length (or knowing John, possibly both!), and I've heard a rumour that a few may plan to do an ascent of Pavey Ark via Jack's Rake. There's usually someone who fancies popping across either Bowfell or Crinkle Crags as well so, between John, myself and A N Other(s), I imagine you'll have a number of walks to choose from this weekend. For anyone who fancies a pleasant easy stroll !!!!!, the 'B' group will be doing the following.
Look forward to seeing you all on Sunday.

Today we traverse one of my favourite fells, though my fondness for this fell isn't borne out of it being one of Lakelands giants, indeed it's a tiny hill by local standards, although its detachment from any other fells does afford it a wonderful location to see those giants that surround it. We've also got an add on - Side Pike - that we can undertake which involves climbing a further 250ft, though the views are worth every bit of effort extended.
We'll depart from the coach at Skelwith Bridge before crossing the River Brathay and following the Cumbria Way which takes us into the Little Langdale valley, passing Colwith Force on the way where we generally stop for a morning brew. Refreshed we continue west to re-cross the Brathay by the quaint Slater Bridge prior to commencing our ascent of Lingmoor.
We'll head through the hamlet of Little Langdale by heading up the road/track that goes to Elterwater, although we leave this just after we've passed Dale End by taking the path that goes around Bield Crag and that eventually deposits us on Brown How, a rocky outcrop that is the summit of Lingmoor Fell at 1539ft.
Its almost, but not quite, all downhill from here, this is the Lake District after all, and as we leave the summit we'll follow the wall heading directly for Side Pike which we can climb if you like, although it's not compulsory. Without ropes (and certain skills) its not possible to climb Side Pike from the point where we arrive at its base although I'm led to believe that there's a path that runs around its craggy southern face. This path reaches a point where your progress is blocked unless you can pass through Fat Mans Agony, a narrow cleft that allows you to continue, providing you don't get stuck! ... Its feasible to get through, but not whilst wearing your rucksack. Sounds like good fun me thinks.
For anyone who either doesn't wish to climb Side Pike, or who alternatively wants to climb it but doesn't want to take on the Fat Mans Agony, they can follow the path down to the road where they'll be able to ascend Side Pike via another easier route. Those of who climb it will return to this point prior to heading downhill into Great Langdale to pass the Old Dungeon Ghyll on our way to the New Dungeon Ghyll where we'll be reacquainted with our transport and have the opportunity to enjoy some refreshments.
05/04/2015 - KIRBY LONSDALE

B Group WALK for the 5th April 2015

KIRBY LONSDALE

Leader - Peter Rossall

Distance 10½ miles / 17 km

Ascent (total) 820ft / 250m

Time 6 hours

Sunset Time 19:54

Maps : OL7 (the English Lakes - south eastern area) & OL2 (Yorkshire Dales southern & western areas)

Start Grid Ref: : SD522762


Hello everyone,
Happy Easter to you all. For those of you who haven't got family commitments this weekend, or Easter Eggs to scoff!, the 'B' group will be doing this easy ten mile walk.
The weather, which has been a tad indifferent all week, is looking fairly promising. Not the 'wall-to-wall' sunshine that we had a fortnight ago but dry and with supposedly good viewing conditions, in spite of some cloud.
We'll not be at any great height so we live in hope that the forecasters have got it right.
Hope to see you all on Sunday.
Pete.
Following our ten miler last time out, I've decided to repeat a walk we last did in February 2012, although I've altered it slightly so that I can keep the mileage in double figures, because I know you all like the extra miles!.....that said, it's far easier terrain than what we encountered a fortnight. We begin our walk from Burton services on the M6 so at least we'll have plentiful (and clean) toilet facilities to start with.
Leaving the services (with care) via the slip road we'll reach Tarn Road before turning back on ourselves to follow the footpath that takes us back past the services we've just come from. A short stretch beside the motorway brings us to a minor road and eventually the Lancaster Canal, which we'll use for some very easy walking for the next 2½ miles.
As the canal ducks under the M6 we have to leave the towpath to cross a field to another minor road, where we'll turn right (east) and head over the motorway with our target, Farleton Fell, looking quite imposing directly ahead of us. The next mile or so sees us enjoying the only difficult bits of today's walk as we climb steeply, and off-piste, onto Farleton Knott. I've never been here but I'm reliably informed that (in the right conditions) the views are fantastic, with Morecambe Bay to the west, the Lake District fells to the north west, the Howgills directly north, Ingleborough to the east and the Bowland fells south of us.
Limestone pavement (similar to Malham) abounds around here and we'll head south across Holmepark Fell where we'll meet the Limestone Link which we'll follow via Hutton Roof all the way to Kirkby Lonsdale, where we'll enjoy a few refreshments and muse over just how easy that walk was for a ten miler!
08/03/2015 - CONISTON

B Group WALK for the 8th March 2015

CONISTON VIA TORVER

Leader - Peter Rossall

Distance 6½ miles / 10½ km

Ascent (total) 2,306ft / 703m

Time 5 hours

Sunset Time 18:02

Map : OL6 The English Lakes South-western area

Start Grid Ref: : SD304973


Hi everyone,
Looks like we're finally going to get some decent weather for our day out on the fells ... well, that's once the rainy start to the day has passed.
As befits us being in March, it's promising to be warmer than we've experienced so far this year. Whatever, we'll just get on with it and do what we do.
Here's what you can do if you fancy joining us sedate 'B' walkers rather than arranging you're own itinerary or following one of John's 'slogathons' across 23 summits (I don't know if he's got anything that extreme in mind, but it wouldn't surprise me!).
Earlier in the week we had 48 booked on so look forward to seeing you all on Sunday.
Pete
After our foiled effort last time out to climb a proper mountain, this weekend finally gives us the opportunity to tackle a biggie. The Old Man of Coniston - and, despite only being the 31st highest fell in the Lakes (so not a biggie by Cumbrian fell standards, but larger than normal for the 'B' group!), it is one of the Lake District's iconic fells, and one that's been denied to us by poor weather on two occasions relatively recently. I'm sure you'll all enjoy it.
Starting from the car park in Coniston, we head uphill immediately and we'll keep ascending for the next two and a half miles until we reach the summit and, on the way there'll be some very steep bits, admittedly interspersed with more moderate gradients and some ugly, but still fairly interesting, bits that give an idea of the mountains past as we pass the disused quarries. Keep having a look around at the ever changing scenery and never forget that this is the Tourist Route!
Not long after passing Low Water we'll be at the summit, complete with its large summit cairn and glorious views, hopefully the morning's rain will have passed and any low cloud will have moved away to allow great viewing conditions. Not sure if we'll be able to see Blackpool Tower (you can on good viewing days) but I'm sure that that won't bother us anyway.
As it tends to be quite breezy up here at 2,635ft above sea level, its not really the place for hanging about but we'll have a look around before moving off as we make our way off the mountain. Heading north initially before turning west (left) we head downhill towards Goats Hawse where we turn left again to then head very steeply (but on a good path) down to Goats Water. Just across the tarn is Dow Crag, one of the Lake District's most popular rock climbing areas. Hopefully we'll have some climbers doing their stuff to watch.
All the hard work done, the remainder of the walk is continuously downhill, although not steeply. Shortly after passing over the Walna Scar Road we come to a disused quarry that includes a man made waterfall tumbling into it which is very picturesque and quite a good spot for an afternoon break. Not far to go now and our final destination is to be Torver where boozers, and those who prefer something warmer and less alcoholic, will both be catered for at the Wilsons Arms, prior to us all being picked up as the coach heads back home through Torver.
22/02/2015 - HORTON-IN-RIBBLESDALE

B Group WALK for the 22nd February 2015

HORTON-IN-RIBBLESDALE

Leader - Peter Rossall

Distance 6 miles / 10 km

Ascent (total) 1522ft / 464m (or 1653ft / 504m with add-on)

Time 4½ hours

Sunset Time 17:35

Map Outdoor Leisure OL2 - Yorkshire Dales, Southern and Western Areas

Start Grid Ref: : SD 808727


Hi all,
I've had a good idea about what I planned to do for this area from when we arranged our walk destinations last September at our AGM so, unless the weather gets really bad, you 'B' walkers have Pen-y-ghent to look forward to.
Chances are that the 'A' walkers will also venture across Pen-y-ghents fine flanks as well, although John will probably have dragged you across two or three others fells beforehand with, knowing John, plenty of 'interesting' bits also!.
Forecast is not great for Sunday, but not terrible either, although as it's so far in advance, there's plenty of scope for it to alter, for good or bad. Live in hope, see you on Sunday.
Here's the easy 'B' walk ...
Pete

After five consecutive walks that used the Ordnance Survey map OL7 (south east Lakes), today we enjoy a bit of diversity as we head over the border into Yorkshire to repeat our circuit of Pen-y-ghent, a walk last done in November 2009.
I'd planned to do this walk again two years ago but was prevented by some fairly extreme weather on what is unquestionably the coldest conditions that I've ever walked in, and, on the day we remained in the valley and didn't attempt to reach any great height.
Lying snow, beautiful looking but very deep lying snow also hindered our progress that day.
Not expecting the same this weekend, but you never know! ...

Starting from the car park in Horton, we head south towards the Church before crossing the beck of Douk Ghyll and following the minor road that leads to Brackenbottom. We leave the tarmac and follow a well defined and well maintained path as it heads gently uphill, with our ultimate goal of Pen-y-ghent directly ahead.
Climbing over a twin stile sees us join the Pennine Way, the famous long distance path that we last walked on in November around Hawes a few miles north of here. A left turn brings us to the steep bit although the summit is only half a mile away. General weather conditions will determine if we stop for lunch at the summit (at 2,273ft) or not, although hopefully w'll enjoy great views of the Pen-y-ghents 'cousins' (Whernside and Ingleborough) to the north and west across the Ribble Valley, and Fountains Fell to the south east.
From the trig point, we continue northerly over another twin stile before heading downhill along a rocky but well defined path prior to turning sharply left, and steeply downhill, as we head for home. As the ground begins to level out we meet the green lane that heads directly back to Horton, however a slight detour brings us to the gaping chasm of Hull Pot which is quite a site, though don't get too close to the edge as there's no escape if you fall in.
Back to the crossroads before we decide whether we'd like to add the extra mileage that's available. Green Lane, or up and over the gentle 130ft climb of Whitber Hill before following what is now the dual use Pennine Way and Ribble Way path back to Horton.
08/02/2015 - CARTMEL

B Group WALK for the 8th February 2015

CARTMEL

Leader - Peter Rossall

Distance 6½ miles / 10.5km

Ascent (total) 657ft / 200m (inc. Latterbarrow 951ft / 290m)

Time 4 hours

Sunset Time 17:08

Map Outdoor Leisure OL7 - The English Lakes, South Eastern Area

Start Grid Ref: : SD 421804


Hi everyone,
A bit of history for you all ... on Sunday February 8th 2004 - so exactly 11 years ago this Sunday - I had my first outing with the Wyre Ramblers Walking Club and I'm delighted to say that it's one of the best decisions I've ever made. I haven't missed many opportunities to 'go on a one-day holiday' every fortnight since then and I've no imminent plans to miss any in the near future, although you just never know, a slip or fall can await any of us at any time!...........take care always.
On that day eleven years ago, I bought my young sister with me and as she'd never done any fell walking previously, we joined Valerie and her band of merry walkers on a 'C' walk from Ambleside to Coniston. To mark that momentous occasion, I've put together what could easily be classed as a 'C' walk for today, so for anyone who doesn't fancy joining John's 'A' group on their 13 mile 'slogathon', the 'B' group will be doing a very easy walk that's around half the distance whilst still reaching the same 'high point' (Hampsfell) as John's group.
Hopefully normal service will be resumed next time out when I plan to take the 'B' group up and over Pen-y-Ghent, an option that was denied to us owing to very heavy snowfall and a bitingly cold wind two years ago when we last visited Horton-in-Ribblesdale.
Here's what we've got to look forward to this weekend.
Pete
Our walk today could quite easily be classed as a C rather than a B walk so take your time or we'll be finished by about 11:30. Todays walk also completes five-walks-on-the-trot which have used Ordnance Survey map No. OL7, which must be a record for a club like ours that prides itself on the diversity of its locations and as the crow flies, our starting point today is only a couple of miles away from where we finished a fortnight ago.
Having bid the A group farewell near Sampool Bridge, we'll not be long after them as we depart the coach at Lindale before heading for Low Meathop where we'll pick up the Cumbria Coastal Way, unfortunately a minor road so its easy walking, but on tarmac, and those of you who know me well know that I'm not overly pleased with this surface. Hopefully the views across the Kent channel and out to Morecambe Bay should help relieve the boredom. Eventually we'll reacquaint ourselves with the main road before crossing the railway line and following the Promenade walkway to Grange-over-Sands where I intend to have a morning elevenses break down by the towns duck pond.
Suitably refreshed, we'll head along Windermere Road before ascending through Eggerslack Wood to Hampsfell where we'll use the Hospice to have lunch (beware of dogs that look all friendly before proceeding to pinch your sandwich, this happened to Bill Crewdson the last time we were here). As pointed out previously, we're very close to where we were a fortnight ago, that said, I sincerely hope that we get better views today as they're generally fantastic from this spot.
All that's left is to head down to Cartmel and to add a little mileage to our already short walk I plan to head due south to pass over Fell End rather than taking the Cistercian Way which leads more directly to Cartmel.
Only a short walk today although hopefully it's been no less pleasant for that.

2014

14/12/2014 - AMBLESIDE

B Group WALK for the 14th December 2014

ORREST HEAD to AMBLESIDE

Leader - Peter Rossall

Distance 6½ miles / 10.5km

Ascent (total) 1010ft / 308m (inc. Latterbarrow 951ft / 290m)

Time : 4 hours - Sunset Time 15:52

Map : OL7 The English Lakes, South Eastern Area

Start Grid Ref: : SD 421987


As befits our final walk of the year after all your hard work this year, I've arranged a nice simple easy walk, one without any big lumps... or it would have been easy had not the weather decided to bid us farewell to 2014 with one of its less affectionately remembered days. Still, we've had a great run this year weather wise so we shouldn't complain too loudly.
We'll begin from the A591 approximately half a mile east of Windermere by following the minor road which leads us to the permitted footpath that takes us through Common Wood and up onto Orrest Head for our usual picturesque ‘elevenses’ break.
Long time B walkers won't require any guidance from here as we take our usual route down to Near Orrest, then via some - what may be muddy - fields to Far Orrest and on to the A592 (Kirkstone Pass) road, which we'll follow for a short stretch prior to heading downhill to cross Trout Beck via the twin footbridges.
Climbing up t'other side of the valley we'll meet Holbeck Lane before following the bridleway that leads us gently uphill to meet Robin Lane, skirting the southern flank of Wansfell. Continuing through Skellghyll Wood to arrive at Jenkin's Crag where, weather permitting, we should get views across Windermere to Wray Castle (where we were a fortnight ago on a balmy late November Sunday). All that's left of our walking year is to follow the path downhill into Ambleside, giving us plenty of time to dry out and get changed ready for our Xmas meal, or alternatively, enjoy a bit of shopping or a pre-meal aperitif.

Finally, as this is our last walk prior to the festive period, please may I wish you all a happy Christmas and good new year and thank you all for your wonderful company throughout the year. See you all again in 2015.

30/11/2014 - HAWKSHEAD

B Group WALK for the 30th November 2014

HAWKSHEAD

Leader - Peter Rossall

Distance 8 miles / 12.8km (inc. Latterbarrow 9.5 miles / 15.25km)

Ascent (total) 495ft / 150m (inc. Latterbarrow 951ft / 290m)

Time : 5 hours (inc. Latterbarrow 6hrs) - Sunset Time 15:57

Map : OL7 The English Lakes South Eastern Area

Start Grid Ref: : SD 353981


Good evening everyone,
I'm a bit of an early bird this week as I've known I'm doing the route we'll be taking for a month or two. As befits the time of year, it's a nice easy walk !!!!.... As I'm a week in advance of our actual walk date I've no idea what the weather has in store for us, that said, whatever we get we'll deal with it without any great 'song and dance' as that's what us 'hardy' types do. See you next Sunday.
Today's walk mirrors the third walk that I ever led after inheriting the 'job' way back in November 2008 in the days when I was nowhere near as confidant as I may appear to be nowadays. So all this new found condfidence will mean there's "not a cat in hells chance" of us going wrong today!.....hmmm, believe that if you really want to. Now then, in deference to St Andrew, whose day it is today, I thought I'd depart from my usual verbosity and give you an extremely brief walk description instead. Hope you like it
PS: This walk is easy
Leave the car park in Hawkshead. Head over the hill to the big lake, Windermere, turn left. Arrive at Wray Castle, have a look around, carry on to meet a road and turn right. Head downhill and turn left. Pass Blelham Tarn before reaching another road where we'll turn left again.

Pass a pub, The Outgate Inn*, do we go in or not?. Whether in the pub or just passing, we now have to decide if we're going to climb Latterbarrow or head directly back to Hawkshead. Told you it was easy.
  • Regarding visiting the Outgate Inn, I've never been in it before but apparently it's a pub with a big reputation for its food and consequently it gets quite busy with "noshers" who tend to have booked in advance so, there's a chance that they may struggle to accommodate 20 or so walkers who just "fancy a bevvy" turning up unannounced.






16/11/2014 - PENDLE

B Group WALK for the 16th November 2014

PENDLE via BARLEY

Leader - Vickie Hillcoat

Distance 8¾ miles / 14 km

Ascent (total) 1565ft / 477m

Time 5 hours - Sunset Time 16:13

Map OL41 Forest of Bowland ' Ribblesdale

Start Grid Ref: SD823403


Hi everyone, I'm using the local knowledge of Vickie Hillcoat, one of our members, for this weekends trip to Pendle. For those who've climbed Pendle Hill with this club previously, you'll be aware that we normally 'attack' it from the north west before finishing in Clitheroe. This year we'll be doing a circular walk from Barley (east of Pendle Hill) - my main concern with starting/finishing from here was whether we could get our coach to Barley but I've been informed by Vickie, by the pub (the Pendle Inn) and by the local council that coaches can reach and park in Barley. Not sure whether John's 'A' group will be finishing in Barley or not but, for anyone who fancies a flat stroll (Vickie's words, not mine) with the 'B' group, here's what we'll be doing. See you all on Sunday. Pete
We have a slight departure from the norm today as I hand over leading the group to Vickie Hillcoat. So what's different then?, you're always 'leading' from the back anyway! Ahem, young Vickie lives locally and has far greater knowledge of this area than myself so I just ask that you all afford her the respect that you always show me. The good point is that Vickie has informed me that it's a flat route with the ascent of Pendle Hill being the only strenuous bit. Hmmm, it appears that she's learnt the first rule of walk leadership is to tell little lies, good girl.
Our walk commences from the car park in Barley (where facilities are available) by following the Pendle Way to White Hough and its Outdoor Centre. Continuing along the Way we pass Croft House and Hollin Farm before crossing Pendle Water via a set of stepping stones which lead us to Old Hall Farm where we leave the Pendle Way to head back towards Barley. Following our relatively easy start to the day this is where it gets a little more strenuous as we begin our ascent of Pendle Hill from Barley Green, passing the reservoirs of Lower and Upper Ogden (as the names suggest, one is higher than t'other) before using Boar Clough to reach the summit of Pendle Hill. Hopefully it's not too breezy up on top, as the views that it gives are wonderful. All downhill from here, and quite steeply as well, as once again we use the Pendle Way to convey us back to Barley where the pub [The Pendle Inn] or the Café [in the car park] await our custom. Walk enjoyed, a big thank you to Vickie should be the order of the day. Work commitments mean she's unable to join us as often as she'd like although she is aware that she's welcome whenever she's free.

02/11/2014 - HAWES

B Group WALK 2nd November 2014

HAWES

Leader - Peter Rossall

Distance 9¼ miles / 15km

Ascent (total) 869ft / 265m

Time 5 hours

Sunset Time 16:38

Map : OL2 Yorkshire Dales Southern and Western areas

Start Grid Ref: : SD785803


'Ow do.....

As John has already said yesterday, it's a bit early to give an accurate weather forecast for this Sunday but, based on what's currently available - breezy from the south west, with cloud but (hopefully) dry or at worst, a light shower or two - I've decided to lead the 'B' group on a walk that we've done previously, the last time two years ago, so it may be new to some of you. As sometimes happens with Wyre Ramblers, the 'B' group are going considerably higher than the 'A' group this week, although the 'A' group will still be doing more miles, and considerably quicker than our "ambling rambling style", still whichever walk you choose, they're both very easy......

I seem to be repeating walks that we've done previously fairly regularly currently although in my defence I'd say that there are logical reasons behind the repeats. This walks justification for its similarity to one that we did two years ago is two fold, firstly because it's a pleasant walk, and relatively undemanding, and secondly because this weekends weather is threatening to be breezy and with showers possible, all from the south-west, so doing this walk means that the weather will be at our backs ... barring the exception of a wee bit early on during our day. We'll also be using our old friend the Pennine Way for some of this walk (is that five or six times this year?), reaching just under 2000ft at our highest point.

We begin our walk from the B6255 a mile and a half after passing the Ribblehead viaduct. Leaving the road we follow the Roman Road/Dales Way east, crossing Gayle Beck (a stretch of water that becomes the river Ribble a mile down stream) by using either the ford or the footbridge prior to climbing steadily uphill to join the Pennine Way at Cam End. Turning north east here, we continue along the ridge for the next three miles, ascending very gently until we reach Kidhow Gate.

We have a choice here as the Pennine Way carries straight on along the West Cam Road, a track that may be a bit boggy or, continuing to the right along the Cam High Road, a better surface, which eventually brings us to the Beggarmans Road, close to its summit atop Fleet Moss, the highest surfaced road in Yaaarksher no less.

If we choose that latter option, and I propose that we do, the walk down the road is extremely steep although it shouldn't cause us any undue problems. As we reach the lower parts of this road we'll leave it and head off to view the waterfall of Aysgill Force before continuing through Gayle on our way to Hawes.

The town of Hawes has a number of pubs and cafes, all of which will be more than happy of your custom. It also has the Wensleydale Creamery, where you can purchase lots of different cheeses, and we'll be very close to the creamery after passing through Gayle so, for anyone who wishes to visit it, you can do that as we pass, or alternatively, drop your stuff at the coach in Hawes and visit the Cheese Shop whilst unencumbered with a hefty rucksack.